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58

Have you made sure to install grunt-cli globally on your Travis node? My Travis CI config looks like: language: node_js node_js: - "0.8" before_install: npm install -g grunt-cli install: npm install before_script: grunt build And my package.json: { ... "scripts": { "test": "grunt test" }, ... } I will explain the flow of ...


18

Here is a part of my .travis.yml files (mostly taken from this file). language: cpp compiler: - clang - gcc before_install: # g++4.8.1 - if [ "$CXX" == "g++" ]; then sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:ubuntu-toolchain-r/test; fi # clang 3.4 - if [ "$CXX" == "clang++" ]; then sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:h-rayflood/llvm; fi - sudo apt-get ...


15

Log in to Travis and go to the build page. You will see a "Restart Build" button on the top-right corner, next to the gear icon: Note: you need to have write access to the linked GitHub repo for this to work.


14

For getting markup You should go to https://travis-ci.org/{username}/{repository} Push the button with "Build status images" title under Your username at the top right After that You will get a popup with markups for different environments Here is a screenshot with popup for my own repository


11

The solution of Ralf stopped working for me. Instead I'm now doing: env: - TERM=dumb script: - ./gradlew assemble -x test


11

You might consider handling this outside of your publish script: after_success: - test $TRAVIS_PULL_REQUEST == "false" && test $TRAVIS_BRANCH == "master" && sbt publish


8

Complete Answer 1) Go to https://travis-ci.org/{username or org}/{repository} 2) Click the Status Image (a pop-up will appear) 3) Select a branch, then click the dropdown Image URL ▼ and set it to Markdown ▼. 5) Copy Paste the code to your README.md 6) Git add, commit & push. Refresh github and you'll see the image now. :)


8

This can (thankfully) be easily solved by modifying the .gitmodules file on-the-fly on Travis, so that the SSH URL is replaced with the public URL, before initializing submodules. To accomplish this, add the following to .travis.yml: # Handle git submodules yourself git: submodules: false # Use sed to replace the SSH URL with the public URL, then ...


7

According to the Travis documentation: https://github.com/travis-ci/travis-ci there is a concoction of projects that collude to deliver the Travis CI web service we know and love. The following subset of projects appears to allow local make test functionality using the .travis.yml in your project: travis-build travis-build creates the build script for each ...


7

I have used jenkins to do this. (with subversion mainly, c/c++ build and also bash/python scripted jobs) The easiest and default handling of VCS/SCM changes in jenkins is to poll for changes on a set time. A build is triggered if there is any change. More than one commit may be included in build (e.g. if 2 commits are done close together) when using this ...


7

I started with the answer from Odi and moved to gulp to get it working. If you specify node_js as your language in your travis file, travis will automatically run npm install followed by npm test The first will install any devDependencies specified in a package.json file, the second will run the script named "test" also from package.json. Below you'll ...


6

You need to explicitly reference env in the allow_failures section: matrix: allow_failures: - env: TEST_GROUP=other


6

TeamCity is free (up to a number of builds and build agents) and feature-rich. It's very easy to install and configure, although it may take some time to find your way through the wealth of options. It is extremely well documented: http://www.jetbrains.com/teamcity/documentation/ It is written in Java but supports many tools natively and others through ...


6

As with any unix command, you could pipe yes into the mix command: yes | MIX_ENV=test mix do deps.get, compile, test


6

Sudo access is turned off on our Docker based architecture, which will be used in two contexts: repositories opt in using sudo: true in their .travis.yml file (it additionally needs to be turned on on our side) on our educational program (see http://education.travis-ci.com) Builds running on our Docker based architecture currently cannot be allowed sudo ...


6

Explanation In your .travis.yml we see: - if [ "$CXX" == "clang++" ]; then export CXX="clang++" && bii cpp:build; fi - if [ "$CXX" == "g++" ]; then export CXX="g++" && bii cpp:build; fi biicode's command bii cpp:build runs CMake with biicode's default generator which is "Unix Makefiles" for UNIX platform (GNU toolchain). Read ...


5

You can add this command to your before_install section in .travis.yml mix local.hex --force After of course, you've already installed elixir in a previous command. I cargo culted this .travis.yml from an existing elixir project on github. language: erlang env: - ELIXIR="v1.0.0" otp_release: - 17.1 before_install: - mkdir -p vendor/elixir - ...


5

Try lowercase require "q". Travis-CI runs on *nix environments, where file systems are often case-sensitive.


5

While the root cause of this problem is still unknown to me, after some investigation and with a help from Robotium's author Renas Reda I could confirm what I initially suspected that emulator indeed locks itself. A workaround I'm using now is this code put in setUp method: getInstrumentation().runOnMainSync(new Runnable() { @Override public void ...


5

I've found a little workaound for this. Basically I've annotated with the @SmallTest annotation the fast tests and using a custom subclass of the InstrumentationTestRunner I'm able to run just them and not the whole suite. You can found the example code in this gist.


5

The way I accomplish setting the timezone is in the before_script section of the travis.yml They give you root access to the VM running your project, so you can simply set the OS timezone that ruby uses: before_script: - echo 'Canada/Pacific' | sudo tee /etc/timezone - sudo dpkg-reconfigure --frontend noninteractive tzdata If you wish, ...


5

Installing via apt-get is currently not possible. See github issue and travis docs. Three other options. Just use pip Your .travis.yml will include: install: - pip install PySide As you mentioned, it will take a LONG time to build PySide from source on the travis-ci servers. However, this method is guaranteed to work. Wait for Travis CI to update to ...


5

You can find out if Travis is checking a pull request by checking the environment variable TRAVIS_PULL_REQUEST. It contains: The pull request number if the current job is a pull request, "false" if it's not a pull request. See also the docs. You can change your command to check this and only build on non-pull requests with if [[ $TRAVIS_PULL_REQUEST ...


5

You likely miss in your travis.yml file: before_script: - npm install -g grunt-cli Then "grunt whatever" should execute ok (assuming you do require grunt in your devDependencies in your package.json). (see http://www.mattgoldspink.co.uk/2013/02/10/using-travis-ci-with-grunt-0-4-x/)


4

It works perfectly fine now, the error was that I accidently created another travis.yml missing the . in front of it - so the actually executed .travis.yml did not contain the environment variables.


4

Caching is only possible with Travis Pro right now, unfortunately. Travis is saying that it will open it up for open source projects at some point though :). If you are a Travis Pro user, you can add the following to cache your node.js modules: cache: directories: - node_modules


4

Are you are working on OSX which has case-insensitive filesystem by default? Try renaming the folder interfaces to Interfaces.


4

No, as of right now, Travis-CI is strictly bound to Github. While there are certainly talks about lessening this requirement, it's still there for still some time to come. As a workaround, you could push your stuff to Github and from there to Travis, using Giuthub only as an intermediary.


4

Travis now supports accessing submodule using ssh, which is by far the easiest solution. You only need to associate your ssh key (or the ssh key of a dedicated CI user) with the Github project you are building, as described in the documentation for private dependencies. $ travis sshkey --upload ~/.ssh/id_rsa -r myorg/main


4

What I've found works is to close the PR in GitHub, then immediately re-open it. That should re-trigger the hook.



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