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158

Try: $('li.current_sub').prevAll("li.par_cat:first"); Tested it with your markup: $('li.current_sub').prevAll("li.par_cat:first").text("woohoo"); will fill up the closest previous li.par_cat with "woohoo".


155

These two terms differentiate between two different ways of walking a tree. It is probably easiest just to exhibit the difference. Consider the tree: A / \ B C / / \ D E F A depth first traversal would visit the nodes in this order A, B, D, C, E, F Notice that you go all the way down one leg before moving on. A breadth first ...


93

If I am reading the algorithm right, this should be an example of how it works: X / \ Y Z / \ / \ A B C D First, X is the root, so it is initialized as current. X has a left child, so X is made the rightmost right child of X's left subtree -- the immediate predecessor to X in an inorder traversal. So X is made the right child of B, ...


89

You can increment the stack depth allowed - with this, deeper recursive calls will be possible, like this: import sys sys.setrecursionlimit(10000) # 10000 is an example, try with different values ... But I'd advise you to first try to optimize your code, for instance, using iteration instead of recursion.


70

Start with the recursive algorithm (pseudocode) : traverse(node): if node != None do: traverse(node.left) print node.value traverse(node.right) endif This is a clear case of tail recursion, so you can easily turn it into a while-loop. traverse(node): while node != None do: traverse(node.left) print node.value node = ...


40

Ok, so in a comment above the question asker Fidilip said that what he/she's really after is to get the path to the current element. Here's a script that will "climb" the DOM ancestor tree and then build fairly specific selector including any id or class attributes on the item clicked. See it working on jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/Jkj2n/209/ ...


31

In my bad attempt at the drawing here's the order that shows how they should be picked. pretty much pick the node that is directly above the line being drawn,.


27

An algorithm which uses recursion goes like this: printNode(Node node) { printTitle(node.title) foreach (Node child in node.children) { printNode(child); //<-- recursive } } Here's a version which also keeps track of how deeply nested the recursion is (i.e. whether we're printing children of the root, grand-children, great-grand-children, ...


27

::WARNING:: .selector has been deprecated as of version 1.7, removed as of 1.9 The jQuery object has a selector property I saw when digging in its code yesterday. Don't know if it's defined in the docs are how reliable it is (for future proofing). But it works! $('*').selector // returns * Edit: If you were to find the selector inside the event, that ...


26

Let me add another one: Postorder traversal is also useful in deleting a tree. In order to free up allocated memory of all nodes in a tree, the nodes must be deleted in the order where the current node can only be deleted when both of its left and right subtrees are deleted. Postorder does exactly just that. It processes both of the left and right ...


24

I didn't think it through entirely, but i think it's possible as long as you're willing to mess up your tree in the process. Every Node has 2 pointers, so it could be used to represent a doubly-linked list. Suppose you advance from Root to Root.Left=Current. Now Root.Left pointer is useless, so assign it to be Current.Right and proceed to Current.Left. By ...


24

How about Morris Inorder tree traversal? Its based on the notion of threaded trees and it modifies the tree, but reverts it back when its done. Linkie: http://geeksforgeeks.org/?p=6358 Doesn't use any extra space.


21

Not exactly sure what you're asking. But yeah, you feed a TreeAlgebra to foldTree corresponding to the computation you want to perform on the tree. For example, to sum all the elements in a tree of Ints you would use this algebra: sumAlgebra :: TreeAlgebra Int Int sumAlgebra = TreeAlgebra { leaf = id , branch = (+) } Which means, ...


20

Forget the definitions, it's so much easier to just apply the algorithm: void inOrderPrint(Node root) { if (root.left != null) inOrderPrint(root.left); print(root.name); if (root.right != null) inOrderPrint(root.right); } It's just three lines. Rearrange the order for pre- and post- order.


18

You are given the pre-order traversal of the tree, which is constructed by doing: output, traverse left, traverse right. As the post-order traversal comes from a BST, you can deduce the in-order traversal (traverse left, output, traverse right) from the post-order traversal by sorting the numbers. In your example, the in-order traversal is 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, ...


18

There are 3 types of Binary tree traversal that you can achieve : example: consider this following Binary tree : Pre-order traversal sequence: F, B, A, D, C, E, G, I, H (root, left, right) In-order traversal sequence: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H ,I (left, root, right) Post-order traversal sequence: A, C, E, D, B, H, I, G, F (left, right, root) code ...


16

In collaboration with @drzaus we've come up with the following jQuery plugin. jQuery.getSelector !(function ($, undefined) { /// adapted http://jsfiddle.net/drzaus/Hgjfh/5/ var get_selector = function (element) { var pieces = []; for (; element && element.tagName !== undefined; element = element.parentNode) { ...


15

It depends what kind of traversal you are performing and the algorithm, but typically it would be O(n) where n is the total number of nodes in the tree. The canonical recursive implementation of depth first traversal, will consume memory (on the stack) in the order of the deepest level, which on a balanced tree it would be log(n).


13

Try $('li.current_sub').prev('.par_cat').[do stuff];


13

Here is a simple in-order non-recursive c++ code .. void inorder (node *n) { stack s; while(n){ s.push(n); n=n->left; } while(!s.empty()){ node *t=s.pop(); cout<<t->data; t=t->right; while(t){ s.push(t); t = t->left; } } }


12

You can do that, you just need to remember the last visited node along with the current node. Doing this is not disallowed by the problem statement: both visited flag on each node and a stack are (worst case) O(n), remembering the last node is just O(1). In C#, the algorithm could look like this: static void Walk(Node node) { Node lastNode = null; ...


12

Yes. You can do something similar to normal level order traversal. You have to use two stacks first stack for printing from left to right second stack for printing from right to left. Start from the root node. Store it's children in one stack. In every iteration, you have nodes of one level in one of the stacks. Print the nodes, and push nodes of ...


11

Give this a go (tested under php 5.2): $inArray = array( array('ID' => '1', 'parentcat_ID' => '0'), array('ID' => '2', 'parentcat_ID' => '0'), array('ID' => '6', 'parentcat_ID' => '1'), array('ID' => '7', 'parentcat_ID' => '1'), array('ID' => '8', 'parentcat_ID' => '6'), array('ID' => '9', 'parentcat_ID' => '1'), ...


11

What you are doing is essentially a DFS of the tree. You can eliminate recursion by using a stack: traverse(Node node) { if (node==NULL) return; stack<Node> stk; stk.push(node); while (!stk.empty()) { Node top = stk.pop(); for (Node child in top.getChildren()) { stk.push(child); } ...


11

Try this out:-http://jsfiddle.net/adiioo7/PjSV7/ HTML:- <div class="last"> <div> <table> <tr> <td> <a>Test</a> </td> </tr> </table> </div> </div> <div> <div> ...


10

Topological sorting is a post-order traversal of trees (or directed acyclic graphs). The idea is that the nodes of the graph represent tasks and an edge from A to B indicates that A has to be performed before B. A topological sort will arrange these tasks in a sequence such that all the dependencies of a task appear earlier than the task itself. Any build ...


10

How about creating my own Stack and using that instead of recursive methods? does that help? Yes! When you instantiate a Stack<T> this will live on the heap and can grow arbitrarily large (until you run out of addressable memory). If you use recursion you use the call stack. The call stack is much smaller than the heap. The default is 1 MB of ...


10

They are quite similar. The difference is that best-first search considers all paths from the start node to the end node, whereas steepest ascent hill climbing only remembers one path during the search. For example, say we have a graph like start ---- A ---- B ---- end \ / ------\ /--------- \ / C where ...


10

I could try to tell you where the problem with your code is but sadly you did not give the definition for foldt1 But this should work (if your implementation of treeFoldt is ok - remember: [] is an instance of Foldable): instance Foldable Tree where foldr f s = Data.Foldable.foldr f s . treeFoldt basic definition using Monoid Anyway, I think the ...


9

Here's a few hints: The last element in the postorder subarray is your new preorder root. The inorder array can be split in two on either side of the new preorder root. You can call recursively call the print_preorder function on those two inorder subarrays. When calling the print_preorder function, the inorder and postorder arrays will be the same size. ...



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