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10

Twitter's trending algorithm is not just volume of keywords. That's part of it, but there's also a decay factor so that "justin beiber" isn't top trending forever. This post on quora backs this up. http://www.quora.com/Trending-Topics-Twitter/What-is-the-basis-of-Twitters-current-Trending-Topics-algorithm?q=trending+algorithm decay is typically done by ...


6

I know of no such gem, but here's an algorithm you may write for yourself: Extract n-grams from texts. Since texts are small (tweet size you said) extract all n-grams, no limit here. "I eat icecream" => {(I), (eat), (icecream), (I eat), (eat icecream), (I eat icecream)} Compute TF-IDF weight vectors for each text's n-grams {(I):0.1, (eat):0.01, ...


5

Probably the simplest possible trending "algorithm" I can think of is the n-day moving average. I'm not sure how your data is structured, but say you have something like this: books = {'Twilight': [500, 555, 580, 577, 523, 533, 556, 593], 'Harry Potter': [650, 647, 653, 642, 633, 621, 625, 613], 'Structure and Interpretation of Computer ...


5

This is widely studied in intrusion detection literature. This is a seminal paper on the issue which shows, among other things, how to analyze tcpdump data to gain relevant insights. This is the paper: http://www.usenix.org/publications/library/proceedings/sec98/full_papers/full_papers/lee/lee_html/lee.html here they use the RIPPER rule induction system, I ...


4

Recreate your data: x <- read.table(text= "author week_1 week_2 week_3 week_4 author1 7 4 5 2 author2 3 6 18 5 author3 1 0 2 4 author4 0 1 1 2 author5 0 1 0 0 ", header=TRUE) One line of code: cbind(x[1], ...


3

you can always convert the date to an integer the web gives this example: DateTime given = new DateTime(2008, 7, 31, 10, 0, 0); TimeSpan t = given.Subtract(new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0)); long unixTime = (long) t.TotalSeconds;


3

What you're looking for is term extraction, which isn't provided natively within MySQL. Some other platforms provide that function, but it's considered an enterprise feature, so you'll have to pay through the nose for it. Alternatively, you can use something like Yahoo!'s Term Extraction API. Here is a blog post that talks about using Yahoo!'s service ...


3

I would apply two low-pass filters to the data, one with a long time constant, T1, and one with a short time constant, T2. You would then look at the magnitude difference in output from these two filters and when it exceeds a certain threshold, K, then that would be a spike. The hardest part is tuning T1, T2 and K so that you don't get too many false ...


3

Assuming you just want to compare the store visits in the first half of the date range to the second half, here's an example that spans the last 40 days using 2 sub-queries to get the counts for each range. select ((endVisits + startVisits)/40) average, (endVisits > startVisits) increasing, ((endVisits - startVisits)/(startVisits) * 100) ...


2

Maybe you can just rank images based on the number of views on your server. If you'd like you can take the 10% best viewed images and rank those based on mentions/likes (as well). This requires 90% less API calls but gives a satisfying result (I think).


2

So, I would start with a basic time ordering (zset of item_id scored by timestamp, for example), and then float things up based on interactions. So you might decided that a single interaction is worth 10 minutes of 'freshness', so each interaction adds that much time to the score of the relevant item. If all interactions are valued equally, you can do this ...


2

A quick search of rubygems.org revelead that you are going to have to do some programming. This is a good thing as a system to generically detect trends would either be hopelessly difficult to setup and tune or awful at guessing what dictates a "trend" in your application. I'm going to make some assumptions about your application. Let's assume users are ...


2

These two links are very helpful: http://stdout.heyzap.com/2013/04/08/surfacing-interesting-content/ http://word.bitly.com/post/41284219720/forget-table


2

First, you need a function that merges a single client's entries. There are two easy ways to merge parallel sequences that might each be missing some values: You can iterate the two in parallel, or you can build a dictionary (or sorted map) of keys, and just handle each sequence separately. You can see an example of the first, e.g., here. But the second is ...


2

The simple answer is to use diff. It just subtracts the current value from the next, so if all of diff(x) is above zero, it is increasing, and vice-versa. First, read the data: # Read in some data. data<-read.table(textConnection('customer_ID transaction_num sales Josh 1 $35 Josh 2 $50 Josh 3 ...


2

I think I would start with something like this. data.table is usually pretty efficient with bigger datasets. #Make fake data require("data.table") data <- data.table(customer_ID=c(rep("Josh",3),rep("Ray",4),rep("Eric",3)), sales=c(35,50,65,65,52,49,15,10,13,9)) data[,transaction_num:=seq(1,.N),by=c("customer_ID")] Now for the actual ...


1

You could try making use of a column based database. These kinds of databases are much better at analytical queries of the kind you're describing. There are several options: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Column-oriented_DBMS We've had good experience with InfiniDB: http://infinidb.org/ and Infobright looks good as well: http://www.infobright.com/ Both ...


1

text1<-"**week 1** **author** **title** **customerID** author1 title1 1 author1 title2 2 author2 title3 3 author3 title4 3 " df1<-read.table(header=T,skip=1,stringsAsFactors=F,text=text1) week1<-read.table(header=F,nrows=1,stringsAsFactors=F,text=text1,sep=";") week1<-substr(week1,3,nchar(week1)-2) df1$week<-rep(week1,nrow(df1)) ...


1

It seems you are trying to detect situations where the curve of the graph you sketched has a slope above a certain threshold. But you don't have a continuous curve, instead you have sample points, one for every assignment of a tweet to a cluster. Two such sample points would in theory define a slope, but these slopes would look very bumpy: two tweets in ...


1

To issue get request you may use jQuery: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.get/ The result will be text of HTML page (it comes in get request callback). To make it into array you should parse it yourself. Since the page is simple, I think regular expressions will be enough: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Guide/Regular_Expressions


1

consider an ordered set with the number of views as the scores. whenever an item is accessed, increment its score (http://redis.io/commands/zincrby). this way you can get top items out of the set ordered by scores. you will need to "fade" the items too, maybe with an external process that would decrement the scores.


1

I guess the simpliest and most effective way to do is to add a trend_score field to your model and update it when the model is saved (you neeed to save the model anyways if you have a view count/comment count on it). Then you can easily filter by this field. You can fore sure do it somehow with SQL, but if you have to update the values you need to update ...


1

It means your program needs some command line parameters. sys.argv contains the list of parameters, and since you did not give any, there was a "index out of range" error. Read the manual carefully.


1

What you are looking for is data mining. I recently stumbledupon this book on hackernews, and i think it is exactly what you are looking for. http://guidetodatamining.com/ The good thing here is that you will find practical examples you can use right away.


1

You can use offsets with LIMIT: SELECT [...] LIMIT 20,10; This retrieves 10 rows, starting at row 20 in the results. Then if you set your ORDER BY to order by count and video id, you'll always get the results in the same order and shouldn't skip any.


1

You can use Graphit. We use it and it's still smooth with 10 curves, each curve around 5000 data points.


1

As it was pointed out by user judotens on this question, you'd divide the message into n-grams. I believe Twitter uses at most 3 words on a trending topic, so the message The cat ate the food. would result on the following items The cat ate cat ate the ate the food The cat cat ate ate the the food The cat ate the food Then, I believe it uses that ...


1

The Trend function adds 2 points to TrendSeries. Point 0 is at X minimum of OrigSeries, and point 1 is at X maximum. To extend the TrendSeries, for example forward, change the point index 1: procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject); var y, m, b: Double; begin TF.CalculateTrend(m, b, OrigSeries, 0, OrigSeries.Count-1); ...


1

Isn't that just a simple derivative? def derivs(l): return [l[i + 1] - l[i] for i in range(len(l) - 1)]


1

First of all, you need to CREATE a DATABASE, in which you want a table with a timestamp and the keyword that's been searched. (CREATE TABLE) Then you want to store each keyword access into this table (INSERT INTO ... VALUES ...) Then you can select the top key words by creating a SELECT query with a "GROUP BY keyword", ORDER ing by COUNT(*) (the number of ...



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