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137

Currently most developers accomplish this using one of the following 3 techniques. The first approach is easily circumvented, the first time you run the app save the date/time to a file, database, or shared preferences and every time you run the app after that check to see if the trial period has ended. This is easy to circumvent because uninstalling and ...


29

You could have another registry key that you increment after every day's use. That way, even if they change the computer's date, this key would indicate to your program that it's been running for > 30 days. Additionally, this value could be encrypted so that if the user tries to manually change it, the program can refuse to run because it was unable to ...


20

What to protect against and what not to protect against: Keep in mind that people will always find a way to get around your trial period. So you want to make it annoying for the person to have to get around your trial period, but it doesn't matter if it's impossible to get around you trial period. Most people will think it's too much work to try and get ...


15

EDIT: You can make your current licensing scheme considerable more difficult to crack by storing the registry information in the Local Security Authority (LSA). Most users will not be able to remove your key information from there. A search for LSA on MSDN should give you the information you need. Opinions on licensing schemes vary with each individual, ...


13

I would suggest using the Calendar class and having your application checking the current date against your expiration date in your OnResume(s). The code would look something like this: protected void onResume() { super.onResume(); Calendar expirationDate = Calendar.getInstance(); expirationDate.set(2009, 7, 3); ...


12

There is always a way to use a trial program after 30 days.


12

Look at this blog post, it's a survey made by Andy Brice on small software vendors. Here you can find the trial types and its % of use. http://successfulsoftware.net/2009/04/23/the-truth-about-conversion-ratios-for-software/ I recommend you the Business Of Software Forum: http://discuss.joelonsoftware.com/default.asp?biz Regular posters there seem to ...


11

There's not much point to doing complicated protection schemes. Basically one of two things will happen: Your app is not popular enough, and nobody cracks it. Your app becomes popular, someone cracks it and releases it, then anybody with zero knowledge can simply download that crack if they want to cheat you. In the case of #1, it's not worth putting a ...


10

If by "best" you mean least breakable, then there is really only one way: make it an Internet-based "software as a service" application. If you don't provide access, they're not using the software. If it is a desktop-based application, then some key piece of functionality would still have to be on an online server somewhere. If the hacker has the entire ...


9

Hey guys this question and the answer of snctln inspired me to work on a solution based on method 3 as my bachelor thesis. I know the current status is not for productive usage but I would love to hear what you think about it! Would you use such a system? Would you like to see it as a cloud service (not having trouble with configuring a server)? Concerned ...


8

This is an old question but anyways, maybe this will help someone. In case you want to go with the most simplistic approach(which will fail if the app is uninstalled/reinstalled or user changes device's date manually), this is how it could be: private final SimpleDateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd"); private final long ONE_DAY = 24 * ...


7

I think a better solution is a feature-limited application -- say you can do basic operations but to take advantage of the best features you have to get a paid license. This does two things -- assuming your app is well-done and interesting to a variety of users. First, you can get a larger number of people to try your app. Second you can get some good ...


7

Why not just hard code an expiry date into the trial program so that you don't have to continue to support it? You could put this in main(). // Die after October 1, 2010 Calendar expireDate = Calendar.getInstance(); // January is 0 (y, m, d) expireDate.set(2010, 9, 1); // Get current date and compare if (Calendar.getInstance().after(expireDate)) { // Die ...


7

Trust your customers to pay the bill. If they want to run your program on two computers at the same time, they will find a way. Make it as easy as possible for your users to use the software. Often, a pirated version of a program is more user-friendly than the legal version. For one thing, the pirated version just keeps working if the license server is ...


7

Limit to number of uses is the fairest way. As for stopping circumvention... Anyone who wants to crack your software will, and most people are too lazy to circumvent anything but the most trivial usage. I'd argue that you want to get those people who regularly use your software to happily pay for it. They're most likely to happily pay for it if they've ...


6

If you go with a date-based approached, it can be circumvented by a user's setting their date back (although I doubt people do this very often). An alternative is to allow the application to be started a certain number of times before expiring; this approach obviously ignores any date changes. My preferred method is to disable parts of the application that ...


6

Use a SNTP (Simple Network Time Protocol) to get the time from an internet atomic clock. There's a few libraries available on the web - here's one for MFC on codeproject.


6

Seriously take a look at Intellilock. It is an off the shelf type system that is very cost effective. You control the level of locks and how many hoops you want your customer to jump through. Don't accept a one size fits all solution when you can customize it. We have used the Desaware system in the past and I personally found it to be a much lower ...


5

It is common for software during the trial period to lack (or limit) some significant feature, such as printing or saving. I've tried (and bought) a panorama assembly tool that put a large watermark across the finished image. It allowed the quality of the tool to be evaluated, but put a real limit on further use of the images created during the evaluation ...


5

You could use a licensing component. You can make one yourself (see the LicenseManager class), or buy one from a vendor (for example CryptoLicensing).


5

Many people will only need this tool once in a lifetime for an import of some data. So you will definitely have to go to a limited version instead of a time version.


5

My preferred method of limiting trial versions is through watermarking. This method works great for software that is used to produce content. E.g. my own HelpScribble and DeployMaster are used to produce help files and installers. The trial versions of these products create help files and installers without any restriction in time or functionality. But ...


5

This step is often delegated to 3rd party tools, such as NET Reactor or Dotfuscator. Those tools (and others) will not only obfuscate your code, but can also support various degrees of licensing protection. For instance, NET Reactor will let you specify timeouts, or number-of-times-run to expire your application. You can then distribute license files to ...


5

I would just do something really simple and just hard enough such that non-programmers wouldn't be able to figure it out. I would something like write to a file the number of milliseconds when the program was first installed in a 64-bit long in binary to a file. And have your main class check and enforce the time limit. Yes people can change their clocks ...


5

From my answer to implementing-expiration-dates-in-an-application/1871218#1871218: Probably the most user friendly to do this is to keep track of the number of days a user has used your software. For example, each time your program starts up you could write a date to an encrypted file (unless the date already exists in the file). Then once there are more ...


5

Here is an idea: Create a database (such as a SQL Server database) that is publicly available on the web. It will keep a list of "trial version" license keys. You can use the same system for full-version license keys when your product is purchased. When your Java software is first run, it'll cause a trial license to be created which will be stored in the ...


4

If this is an app that will be used for a long time, go with 30 days non-nag (show "trial" in the titlebar and AboutBox, etc., but nothing that needs clicking), then nag for 7 days, then use an escalated crippling. Maybe some watermarking of the output. You probably do not need to fully disable the app. In order for the purchase/abandon decision to tip in ...


4

The problem with trying to limit the dates is that the naive solution of just checking the date is easily fooled if the person sets back their system clock. I worked with a guy who kept a VMWare virtual box just for running time limited software. A better approach would be to record the time of the last time it was run, and if the time ever goes before ...


4

The standard Windows API is unable to deal with null characters in key/value names, whereas the native API can. As such, you can create a key containing one or more NULL characters in the name to store your licensing data, which would not be deletable using standard tools like regedit. See: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/dd581628 for ...



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