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9

Actually, there is an option, TRIMMED, to do what you want. proc sql noprint; select name into :nameselected TRIMMED from list where id=2; quit; Also, end PROC SQL with QUIT;, not RUN;.


7

Ok, I have better solution now :) x <- c("This is the longest sentence in world, so now just make it longer","No in fact, this is the longest sentence in entire world, world, world, world, the whole world") extract <- function(x){ result <- stri_extract_first_regex(x, "^.{0,40}( |$)") longer <- stri_length(x) > 40 result[longer] <- ...


5

Base R solution: baseR <- function(x){ m <- regexpr("^.{0,40}( |$)", x) result <- regmatches(x,m) longer <- nchar(x)>40 result[longer] <- paste(result[longer],"...",sep = "") result } baseR(x)==extract(x) [1] TRUE TRUE Works just like @bartektartanus extract :) But it's slower... I tested this on data generated from his code. ...


5

Trim it, using trim method of String which "Returns a copy of the string, with leading and trailing whitespace omitted." Note that it Returns a copy of the string and doesn't edit the String myString.trim() Null Strings As @rmertins said, this is not "null safe", meaning if your String is null it will throw a NullPointerException so if your String can ...


4

Try using parseInt() to make your comparison a number vs. a number rather than comparing text strings (it alleviates issues with whitespace. JSFIDDLE $(function () { if (parseInt($(".notification-counter").text()) == 0) { //$(".notification-counter").hide(); $(".notification-container").hide(); } });


4

It works if you specify a separator: proc sql; select trim(name) into :nameselected separated by '' from list where id=2; run;


3

It is working all right. trim function removes all newlines, spaces (including non-breaking spaces), and tabs from the beginning and end of the supplied string. It DOES NOT remove spaces from the middle.


3

Figured I'd post this one too. Definitely not stringi speed, but it's not too shabby. I needed one to bypass the print methods for str so I wrote this. charTrunc <- function(x, width, end = " ...") { ncw <- nchar(x) >= width trm <- strtrim(x[ncw], width - nchar(end)) trimmed <- gsub("\\s+$", "", trm) replace(x, ncw, ...


3

Maybe the whitespace is not just a space: Try this: UPDATE US_City_State SET [City] = LTRIM(RTRIM(REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE([City], CHAR(10), ''), CHAR(13), ''), CHAR(9), ''), CHAR(160), ''))) Explanation: Some white space are not really space (' '). Here are some of the whitespace: CHAR(9) = Horizontal Tab CHAR(10) = Line Feed ...


2

You could use preg_replace function. $string = "Choose > Apples > Green > Wholesale > 5KG boxes"; echo preg_replace('~^[^>]*>\s*|\s*(?:>[^>]*){2}$~', '', $string); Output: Apples > Green


2

Use trim as there are white spaces FIDDLE $(function () { if ($.trim($(".notification-counter").text()) == "0") { $(".notification-counter").hide(); $(".notification-container").hide(); } });


2

When working with an URL, consider using the Uri class. Then handling such cases become easy. Create a Uri instance: Dim url = new Uri("http://example.com/aa/bb/cc.html") Then you can either do Dim result = url.AbsoluteUri.Remove(url.AbsoluteUri.Length - url.Segments.Last().Length) or something like Dim result = new Uri(url, ".").AbsoluteUri


2

Try this instead: parse_str($_REQUEST['data'], $v); $v = array_map('trim', $v); If you want to trim whitespace from each element in the query string, first convert your query string to an array with parse_str(), then trim() each resulting element of that array. EDIT Based on one of your comments above, you may be looking for something more thorough than ...


2

The second parameter to trim isn't a string as such, more a list of chars you want to strip from the start and end of the string. So, you're telling to strip all leading and trailing <, >, \, b and r characters. Could try something like this regex to strip what you want from the front and end of a string... //trim from start ...


1

The easiest way to solve this is by exploding the string into an array. After that you just print the two items you need. $string = 'Choose > Apples > Green > Wholesale > 5KG boxes'; $stringParts = explode(' > ', $string); $newString = $stringParts[1].' &gt; '.$stringParts[2];


1

$separator = ' > '; $string = "Choose > Apples > Green > Wholesale > 5KG boxes"; //explode your string, but keep in mind someone could use > in the content $parts = explode($separator, $string); //unset the first array_shift($parts); array_pop($parts); //unset the last one array_pop($parts); //unset the second last //combine them back ...


1

The time() function returns the current time in the number of seconds since the Unix Epoch (January 1 1970 00:00:00 GMT). So what you see is an integer in seconds. You define your timezone in the PHP.ini


1

Wouldn't it be easier to do it this way? (Using the id as the value of the select options) <form role="form" method="post" id="switch-customer-form" class="switch-customer-form"> {% csrf_token %} <div class="form-group col-xs-12 floating-label-form-group controls"> <select class="form-control customers-dropdown" ...


1

For what it's worth, here is a trim implementation with an eye towards performance. It's much quicker than many other trim routines I've seen around. Instead of using iterators and std::finds, it uses raw c strings and indices. It optimizes the following special cases: size 0 string (do nothing), string with no whitespace to trim (do nothing), string with ...


1

The reason this is so difficult is that PDF has no concept of paper color or background color. So what you're seeing is not a different background color, but an object (typically a rectangle) painted in that yellow background color. Most cropping tools simply calculate the bounding box of all objects on the page and then crop away everything outside that ...


1

Self-closing elements as the HTML specification defines them are very special to the browser parser. You can't make your own, so for your custom elements you have to stick to non-void elements Try with: <div style="position: relative"> <div>TEST:</div> <ng-my-directive></ng-my-directive> ...


1

You can split the string with ':' and remove the quotes. var str = "1:""Transmitters"""; var output = str.Split(':')[1].Replace("""",""); or you can also use Regular Expressions (Regex class).


1

To extract between quotes int pos = str.IndexOf('"'); str = str.Substring(pos + 1, str.Length - pos - 2);


1

String.trim() will trim away white space at the beginning and end. That would probably be the quickest way. If you need to retain other white spaces and only want to remove the \n, I think you would have to replace them manually. You could try something along the lines of myString = myString.replace("^(\n)*","").replace("(\n)*$",""); (I have not tried ...


1

Just remove the quotes around 0, and it would work fine. $(function () { if ($(".notification-counter").text() == 0) { $(".notification-counter").hide(); $(".notification-container").hide(); } }); Additional Information: Since many here seem to be unclear, here's a little helper: Try this in your console //hit F12 to view the ...


1

You forgot about line end chars Try rtrim($data, "\n\r,");


1

use a combination of Substring and Lastindex of. Like this: url.substring(0,url.lastindexof("/")) might be that you need to substract 1 from the lastindexof("/") value, i always forget it^^


1

Write and configure your own adapter? Just as you'd configure CollapsedStringAdapter? <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <jaxb:bindings version="1.0" xmlns:jaxb="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns:xjc="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb/xjc"> <jaxb:bindings schemaLocation="myschema.xsd" ...



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