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13

Timestamping is used to specify time when the digital signature is made. This is needed to properly validate the signature. If signature timestamp is present, the application which validates (verifies) the signature, will check whether the certificates involved into signature validation were valid at the moment of signing. If there's no timestamp for the ...


7

You're better off selecting one of the trusted certificate providers (Verisign, Thawte, Comodo, etc.). This allows you to sign your software without the user explicitly trusting your private root CA. We've used both Verisign and Thawte, Comodo even GoDaddy with timestamping without any issues with the software becoming invalid even years after the ...


7

Just spent the last 2 hours looking for this issue and finally found a way to identify whether a jar file actually has time stamp information in the Signature Block file included. I could see the GlobalSign certifcate in the hexeditor of the /META-INF/FOO.DSA file, but I did not find any tool which would print out the information you need. You can rename ...


6

Time stamping is a free service -- it's really only a trusted provider verifying that you signed the file at a given time. Verisign's timestamp service is the standard one. The final example in the help for Set-AuthenticodeSignature demonstrates how to use it. Lee Holmes [MSFT] Windows PowerShell Development Microsoft Corporation


6

The code-signing certificates issued by StartSSL contain the enhanced key usage (EKU) attribute "Lifetime Signing" (1.3.6.1.4.1.311.10.3.13), which causes the file signatures to expire when the certificate expires, regardless of any timestamps.


6

This is called Timestamping (TSP protocol, RFC 3161). Different digital signature standards (PDF and XML signatures, CAdES, PAdES, XAdES) include support for advanced timestamping based on TSP. MS Authenticode also includes timestamping, but uses different (incompatible and less secure) mechanism for it. TSP alone (without signature protocols) is not used ...


6

I finally figured it out myself. It should come as no surprise, but the answer is nauseatingly complex and indirect. The missing pieces to the puzzle were in RFC 5652. I didn't really understand the TimeStampResp structure until I read (well, skimmed through) that document. Let me describe in brief the TimeStampReq and TimeStampResp structures. The ...


5

In a nutshell: You are time stamping the wrong data, see the bottom of the answer. Major differences between your signature and Adobe's signature: Adobe's signature contains a signed revocation information attribute; this attribute does not contains any actual revocation information. As this attribute is optional, it should not be relevant here. Your ...


5

This is called timestamping. The most widely used mechanism is defined in TSP specification (RFC 3161) and some others. The alternative method is used in MS Authenticode, but it's not documented and is not compatible with TSP. TSP is used as a supplementary function in several encryption and digital signature standards, such as PDF, XAdES, CAdES, PAdES ...


4

Relevant section of RFC 3161: If the certReq field is present and set to true, the TSA's public key certificate that is referenced by the ESSCertID identifier inside a SigningCertificate attribute in the response MUST be provided by the TSA in the certificates field from the SignedData structure in that response. That field may also contain other ...


4

All you have to do, is publish the SHA1 (the commit id) publicly. If you like, you can take that SHA1 and sign it with your X.509 certificate (using an appropriate timestamping service) and keep that around. If anybody challenges your authorship, you can easily show that you knew the contents of the repository at the particular time that generated that ...


4

If the signing certificate expires and there's no timestamp, there's no way to verify that the signature was made at a time when the certificate was valid, so previously signed code may just "stop working". Timestamping involves a third party (usually your CA) attesting that you made the signature at a particular time. Regardless of when your certificate ...


4

If you're looking for a working RFC3161 server then http://time.certum.pl/ has been one that I've known and has been around. If you're looking for a bigger solution that do not depend on a single secret based timestamping box (basically something that scales well) have a look at http://www.guardtime.com Technically, a timestamp is a UNIX timestamp :) But ...


3

You need to write a custom HTTP Timestamp server. It should follow RFC 3161 Time-Stamp Protocol (TSP) rules. When you sign your DLL for authenticode with a tool such as Signtool.exe from the Windows SDK, you can specify the url of the timestamp server (with the /t swich. See also /tr and /td). You would then point to your server. See here on SO for a ...


3

What about Bouncy Castle and its TSP support?


2

In your particular case it's not countersigning at all. The Authenticode timestamp is included as an attribute in PKCS#7 packet of the original signature. It's a signature (its digest) that is timestamped. The server signs the digest and the time value with its certificate. Consequently there's no room (or sense) for replay attack - if you change the data, ...


2

Yes, there are commercial services that would securely timestamp documents or software. There's an article in Wikipedia explaining this. Google quickly revealed one such service (I am not affiliated), I'm sure there are many more. There used to be a free one as well, but it's all a question of trust (i.e. whether the courts would trust "someone on the ...


2

Simply add a time stamped certificate to your latest commit. The sha1 will verify that the certificate hasn't been modified, and the certificate itself will verify all those 'facts' that it claims, such as the date and time stamp from a trusted server, and who you claim to be, etc. That is, the commit signs the certificate, as per VonC's quote from Linus's ...


2

You can develop your own timestamping service. You can write TSP (RFC 3161) server but Authenticode doesn't use RFC 3161 but PKCS#7/PKCS#9 formats as described in MSDN article (which you can implement as well). Our SecureBlackbox components include timestamping server component which supports both formats. But the problem is to get the certificate which you ...


2

I'm glad that you find our software helpful. But you refer to our old service. Please visit www.ntp.org.pl - you'll find there the latest version of timestamping client and a lot of other useful free software related to time topic. I'm not sure what you want to do. Maybe if you give a few more details, I'd be able to help you better. Anyway, I'll give you ...


2

Analyzing communication with wireshark, this example gives me a "bad message digest" error. A digest code that works for me is: MessageDigest messageDigest = MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA-1"); messageDigest.update("messageImprint".getBytes()); byte[] digest = messageDigest.digest();


2

You can try one of these publicly accessible RFC 3161 compliant time-stamping services: http://time.certum.pl http://dse200.ncipher.com/TSS/HttpTspServer http://tsa.safecreative.org Feel free to edit the answer and extend the list.


2

signed_lipsum.pdf, first version The time stamp token references as signer some CN=e-Szigno Test TSA2,OU=e-Szigno CA,O=Microsec Ltd.,L=Budapest,C=HU which has been issued by CN=Microsec e-Szigno Test Root CA 2008,OU=e-Szigno CA,O=Microsec Ltd.,L=Budapest,C=HU with serial number 7. It does not provide this certificate itself, though, and ...


1

Here is a timestamping service that has been in continuous operation since 1995. http://www.itconsult.co.uk/stamper/stampinf.htm You send your data (or a hash of your data) by email, and get back a signature of your data plus a timestamp with a serial number. The detached signatures (but not the data itself) are posted publicly, and anyone can archive ...


1

You can use the jarsigner utility to determine if a signed JAR has been timestamped as follows: jarsigner -verify -verbose -certs signed.jar You can find the full example here: https://blogs.oracle.com/mullan/entry/how_to_determine_if_a


1

After hard testing, i have found the solution. The SHA-256 hash generated in javascript can be used directly in bouncyclaste after some type conversion as follows: byte[] decodedHex = Hex.decodeHex(digest.toCharArray()); so you can use it as a normal java.security.MessageDigest when they are both converted to byte[] full code here: // Get hash ...


1

I am not sure to understand why you want to rebuild the data structure signed in the response. Actually if you want to extract the signed data from the time-stamp server response you can do this: var tsr = GetTimestamp(hashToTimestamp, nonce, "http://some.rfc3161-compliant.server"); var tst = tsr.TimeStampToken; var tsi = tst.TimeStampInfo; var signature = ...


1

M2Crypto does not yet wrap those pieces of openssl, so you can't use M2Crypto for what you are using the openssl command line client for.


1

"Can we setup a time stamp service to do the same?" Use http://www.opentsa.org/


1

Time stamp servers are usually not free-to-use. Alternatively you may use an HMAC-MD5 (or HMAC-SHA1) instead and use a password that is only known to the authorized user. The password is of course not directly used, better via PKCS#5 or at least hashed with a seed. Without the password noone can verify or recreate the HMAC-MD5



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