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1

You could simplify the whole thing by just using: select max(tsdate) as tsdate from timesheet where pat = @PATcode


1

The scalar is being called for each row in timesheet. Try the following: select dbo.fn_PAT_LastTS('ZZ793843')


1

Single query to set primaryEmail=1 for first email for each person except ones who already have primary email: UPDATE Account.tbEmail E SET E.primaryEmail=1 WHERE E.EmailID in ( -- get min email id for each person SELECT min(PE.EmailID) FROM Account.tbPersonEmail PE -- but exclude persons who already have primary email ...


1

Try this: SELECT TOP 1 @lastTS = tsdate FROM timesheet WHERE pat = @PATcode ORDER BY tsdate DESC EDIT: The problem is with how you calls the function: SELECT dbo.fn_PAT_LastTS('ZZ793843') FROM timesheet This will select all rows from timesheet with one column whose values is the result of dbo.fn_PAT_LastTS('ZZ793843'). You should be calling it like ...


2

RIGHT() is counting characters from the end of the string. That has nothing to do with what CHARINDEX() returns, because that function returns a position counting from the beginning. You can do what you want using substring(): update mytable set myfield = substring(myfield, charindex(',', myfield) + 1, length(myfield)) where myfield like 'un%,%' ; ...


2

SELECT r.IndusName, r.NTLogin FROM ResourceLevel r INNER JOIN HierarchyLevel h ON r.NTLogin IN (h.NTLevel1, h.NTLevel2, h.NTLevel3, h.NTLevel4, h.NTLevel5) or ON r.NTLogin = h.NTLevel1 OR r.NTLogin = h.NTLevel2 OR r.NTLogin = h.NTLevel3 OR r.NTLogin = h.NTLevel4 OR r.NTLogin = h.NTLevel5 You can use any logical condition to join two tables.


0

Creating temporary tables is a very expensive way to do this, and using loops is a bad idea is SQL, as they are slow, since they can't be optimized. The typical method uses subqueries instead. To start, try doing this: CREATE TABLE #TEMP(PERSONID INT, PRIMARYEMAIL INT,FLAG INT) CREATE INDEX IDX_TEMP_PERSONID ON #TEMP(PERSONID) INSERT INTO #TEMP SELECT ...


1

Scalar UDFs in SQL Server must be prefixed by a schema identifier. While I cannot find a specific rationale for this, I'll speculate that it is to reduce confusion and namespace conflict between intrinsic functions (ISNULL, etc.) and UDFs. The consequence of this is that double-dot notation, where you are specifying a database but using your default schema ...


1

you can use stuff with for xml path to concatenate column values you can use a corelated sub query to get the comma separated values Also it is not a good idea to store it as comma separated values in the database. ;with cte as ( select ID, stuff((select ','+ T2.UDValue from #T2 T2 where T2.ID = T1.ID FOR XML ...


0

This is what I have come up with so far but I am not sure that it is the most efficient way to do this: CREATE TABLE #T1(ID INT, UDValue NVARCHAR(50)) CREATE TABLE #T2(ID INT, UDValue NVARCHAR(50)) INSERT INTO #T1(ID) VALUES(1) ,(2) ,(3) INSERT INTO #T2(ID, UDValue) VALUES(1, 'Tom') ,(1, 'Dick') ...


0

Maybe not scalable but try INSERT INTO pages with (tablock) (pageid, siteid) SELECT (SELECT ISNULL(CAST(MAX(ABS([pageid])) AS int), 1000) + 1 FROM pages WHERE siteid = 4385), 4385; I just read the comments - if (UPDLOCK) workds then stay with that


0

What you need to do is to PIVOT your data. Please, read this documentation: Using PIVOT and UNPIVOT. If you don't like the new column names, you must do a select from (your pivoted query), and include aliases for each column name, i.e. select q.[col1] as [Alias1], q.[col2] as [Alias2], ... from (your pivoted query) as q In fact, if yu google for ...


0

You can aggregate data by any period of time by getting the interval using datediff, and then making the integer division, like this: group by datediff(hour, '1990-01-01T00:00:00', yourDatetime) / 3 The maths are: get the integer number of hours from the base date, and make an integer division by 3, what yields groups of 3 consecutive hours with the same ...


0

I found this answer on another forum, works perfect. No problems with finding 1 if there is also a 10 WHERE tablename REGEXP "(^|,)@search(,|$)" I found it here


-2

You seldom need a cursor! A simple case statement should suffice. Of the top of my head something like: WITH CTE AS ( SELECT a.*, SUM(b.hrly_qty) AS running_total, c.gap FROM #tmpTrxhist2 a INNER JOIN #tmpTrxhist2 b ON a.people_id = b.people_id AND b.sequence_id <= a.sequence_id ...


0

You can create triggers on Breedings table to check this rule. Trigger is a special stored procedure which executed automatically on INSERT\UPDATE\DELETE on some table. So you can write a trigger that checks all new rows inserted in Breedings and if there is a row where Date is less then appropriate BirthDate, throw error. Same for UPDATE, if Date column is ...


1

If I understand it, right now your architecture looks like this: SMS Service DB \ / \ / Desktop You'd like it to look more like this: SMS Service <---- DB \ / \ / Desktop That sounds like a bit of a mess: everything talking to everything else. That way lies madness. ...


0

You make your query dynamically in SSRS. However, in SSRS, it need to fetch the metadata from the result set as data fields so that they can be rendered in tablix. In this scenario, since your result set is dynamic, it can get the fixed data field. So it can never be displayed in report body.


0

No one can tell you the best way, unless you test them yourself. I would do this using temp tables like this: DECLARE @ICD10 TABLE ( ID INT ) DECLARE @OPCS TABLE ( ID INT ) INSERT INTO @ICD10 SELECT ICD10 FROM dbo.CH_ref_fertility_ICD10 INSERT INTO @OPCS SELECT OPCS FROM dbo.CH_ref_fertility_OPCS UPDATE ...


0

You could group by date and hour separately, this would let you have hour-expressions. For example; GROUP BY cast(InteractionDate as date), (hour(InteractionDate)/4) This would give you midnight to 6am in the first bucket, 6am to midday in the next etc.


0

you didn't mention the desired output and input. However you can try like this, Declare @t table (id int ,parentid int) insert into @t select 1,1 union all select 5,1 union all select 47894,5 union all select 47897,47894 ;With CTE as ( select * from @t where id=1 union all Select a.* from @t a inner join cte b on b.id=a.parentid and a.id<>b.id ) ...


0

Your query is doing recursion but in opposite direction. So if you change starting point to: where id = 1 then you will have user 1 and all his successors


4

Try this to get all parents of a child ;with name_tree as ( select id, parentid from Users where id = 47897 -- this is the starting point you want in your recursion union all select C.id, C.parentid from Users c join name_tree p on C.id = P.parentid -- this is the recursion -- Since your parent id is not NULL the recursion will ...


0

Try this instead: UPDATE t1 SET Is_fertility = coalesce(t2.x, t3.x, 0) FROM OP_working t1 OUTER APPLY (SELECT top 1 1 x FROM dbo.CH_ref_fertility_ICD10 WHERE ICD10 IN (t1.PRIMARY_DIAGNOSIS_CODE_CLND, t1.SECONDARY_DIAGNOSIS_CODE_1_CLND, t1.SECONDARY_DIAGNOSIS_CODE_2_CLND, t1.SECONDARY_DIAGNOSIS_CODE_3_CLND, t1.SECONDARY_DIAGNOSIS_CODE_4_CLND, ...


0

Order by 5th field in the result set.


0

Your query is lacking an ORDER BY clause, so the results may happen to be in order (as some ordering must be done anyhow to get the running total), but this is in no way guaranteed. So you must add an ORDER BY clause and everything should be fine. SELECT ... ORDER BY AccountID, CASE WHEN TranasactionDateTime IS NULL THEN 0 ELSE 1 END, -- NULLs ...


0

There are multiple records for single Payments.Accounts.DateTime. Not sure if Payments.Transactions has a TransactionId column. If it does, You can write SUM(T.Amount) OVER ( PARTITION BY T.Account_Id ORDER BY T.DateTime, T.TransactionId )


1

WITH Duplicates AS (SELECT Probe_id, Timestamp, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Probe_id, Timestamp ORDER BY Probe_id, Timestamp) AS [RowNumber] FROM Reading ) DELETE FROM Duplicates WHERE Duplicates.RowNumber > 1


1

Group by the columns making the records duplicates and then count how much every group has select Probe_id, Timestamp, count(*) as num_of_duplicates from Reading group by Probe_id, Timestamp having count(*) > 1


1

Why not just do: Select SupplierID + ',' anothercolumn + ',' + LEFT(STUFF( ( SELECT DISTINCT '', '' + cpl.clplAcNo FROM tblSuppliers s JOIN tblClientPriceLists cpl ON (cpl.clplSupplierId = supRowID) WHERE s.supRowID = 1179 AND clplAcNo IS NOT NULL AND clplAcNo <> '''' FOR XML PATH('''') ), 1, 1, ''''), 300)


0

See the MSDN docs for QUOTENAME, note the sentence about the first parameter "Is a string of Unicode character data. character_string is sysname and is limited to 128 characters. Inputs greater than 128 characters return NULL." As mentioned above, dynamic SQL is best avoided if you can. You could use this instead of dynamic SQL, and you can easily add a ...


0

Okay so i thought about how this can be done and i wrote the following procedure: IF (OBJECT_ID('TheDropper') IS NOT NULL) DROP PROC TheDropper GO CREATE PROC TheDropper @ProcName NVARCHAR(500) AS BEGIN DECLARE @DropScript NVARCHAR(MAX) IF EXISTS(SELECT object_id FROM sys.sql_modules WHERE object_id = OBJECT_ID(@ProcName)) SET @DropScript ...


1

This is pretty broad, but I'll give you as general an answer as I can. CTEs... Are unindexable (but can use existing indexes on referenced objects) Cannot have constraints Are essentially disposable VIEWs Persist only until the next query is run Can be recursive Do not have dedicated stats (rely on stats on the underlying objects) Temp Tables... Are real ...


1

If I understand correctly, it seems that either you may use exist xml type method or simply else branch of the case statement, see sample: declare @xml xml; --set @xml = '<Test><Item>False</Item></Test>'; --set @xml = '<Test><Item>True</Item></Test>'; set @xml = '<Test />'; select case when ...


0

Declare @i Numeric(18,2) Declare @strSQL nvarchar(1000) select @i = Round(COUNT(1)/10,2) from tb_Item print(@i) Declare @j int = 0 Declare @rem numeric(18,2) select @rem = COUNT(1) - ((COUNT(1)/10) * 10) from tb_Item while @i > 0 Begin set @j = (@j + 1); if @j = 1 Begin WITH OrderedOrders AS ( select ...


2

In order to reset the password, you have to log on the SQL Server Management studio and go to security -> Logins right click on the user and set the new password One item could be the open SQL Server Configuration Manager and check if required client protocols are allowed (TCP/IP)


1

You might google "Levenshtein distance". Here's a potentially relevant answer: Levenshtein distance in T-SQL


1

try this IF OBJECT_ID('Tempdb..#DispatchTime') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #DispatchTime CREATE TABLE #DispatchTime ( [dis_ID] INT IDENTITY(1, 1) , [dis_fk_pro] INT , [dis_weekDay] TINYINT , [dis_displayDay] VARCHAR(12) , [dis_time] TIME(0) ) INSERT INTO #DispatchTime ( dis_fk_pro, dis_weekDay, dis_displayDay, ...


0

To do something like this you'll need to use dynamic SQL. DECLARE @SQL VarChar(2000) DECLARE @ColumnName VarChar(400) = 'name' SET @SQL = 'SELECT PATINDEX(''%b'',' + @ColumnName + ') AS Test FROM Table' EXEC (@SQL)


-1

Not clear what you are asking. My interpretation SELECT PATINDEX ('%b%', column_name) AS Test FROM information_schema.columns where table_name = 'Table'


0

There is also the possibility of using WHERE NOT EXISTS: SELECT t1.id FROM table t1 WHERE t1.value = 'A' AND NOT EXISTS ( SELECT 1 FROM table t2 WHERE t2.id = t1.id AND t2.value = 'B' );


0

try this method (temp table instead cte), perfomance must be much higher for your task IF OBJECT_ID('Tempdb..#CTE_A') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #CTE_A IF OBJECT_ID('Tempdb..#CTE_C') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE #CTE_C ------------------------------------------------------------- SELECT A1 , A2 ,... INTO #CTE_A --data set into temp table FROM ...


1

Even though you accepted an answer, I'll write another variant. I think it is easier to write and understand. In terms of performance you have to check how different variants work on your system with your real data. DECLARE @T TABLE (ID int, Value char(1)); INSERT INTO @T (ID, Value) VALUES (1, 'A'); INSERT INTO @T (ID, Value) VALUES (1, 'B'); INSERT INTO ...


0

here is another query for it: select distinct tb.ID from tbl_name tb where tb.Value='A' and tb.ID not in(select distinct tbl.ID from tbl_name tbl where tbl.Value='B')


1

You need to exclude any ID's that contain the value 'B'. you can do this with a left join and a check for null... i.e. no match. select d.* from data d left join (select id from data where value = 'B') x --exclude these on d.id = x.id where x.id is null and d.value = 'A'


0

Personally with so many conditions in this where clause it is going to be a nightmare to figure out where the performance issue is. If it was me I would look to split this query down into smaller queries so that you are working on ever decreasing sub sets. eg get the results of just INSERT INTO myWorkingTable (some columns here....) SELECT ...


0

You Could try adding option(recompile) To the end of that SQL query. See if that speeds it up a bit.


0

try this: select * from purchase where datepart(hour, current_timestamp - data) > 2 where "data" is a tablefield type datetime Angelo


4

How about this? SELECT POWER(10, CONVERT(INT, LOG10(@Input))) It takes the log base 10 of the input value (which returns the value of the exponent to which you would have to raise 10 to in order to get the input value), then it lops off the decimal portion leaving only the whole number, and then raises 10 to that power.


3

You just need logs and their opposite (power)... power(10, floor(log10(x))) As follows... log10(99) = 1.9956351946 floor(1.9956351946) = 1 power(10, 1) = 10 This does, however, assume that your example is wrong and that 1 -> 9 should "round" to 1... log10(9) = 0.95424250943 floor(0.95424250943) = 0 power(10, 0) = 1



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