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0

Constraint is on the table not a single statement Kind of ugly but Put it in a transaction and take a tablock begin transaction ALTER TABLE branchOffice NOCHECK CONSTRAINT ALL insert into branchOffice with (tablock) -- Re-enable the constraints on a table ALTER TABLE branchOffice WITH CHECK CHECK CONSTRAINT ALL commit transation;


0

In your case, maybe its easier to understand if i use your where clause ,example: SELECT * FROM yourTable WHERE LOWER(whatever) = 'candy' or SELECT * FROM yourTable WHERE UPPER(whatever) = 'CANDY'


0

The original answer the author gave works pretty well. Just to extend this idea, you can do something like group by datediff(minute, 0, time)/10 which will allow you to group by a longer period then 60 minutes, say 720, which is half a day etc.


0

declare @val1 decimal(15,4) set @val1=1.4 select CASE WHEN @val1-floor(@val1) >0.4 THEN ceiling(@val1) ELSE floor(@val1) END REFER


0

Make sure that at least one of the arguments "a" or "b" is CAST as a FLOAT as per the following: select ROUND(15.5/CAST(10 AS FLOAT), 0) -- returns 2 select ROUND(14.5/CAST(10 AS FLOAT), 0) -- returns 1 That will ensure that you get REAL division (not integer division).


0

You have an answer to the syntax error You negate the left join with the where I bet the extra has row has p.paymenttypeid between 9 and 13


4

I think the problem is your WHERE clause, WHERE sec.BudgetActivityDetailCurrentBiennium.BudgetNbr = '076036' which applies to the SELECT as a whole, not just (as I guess you intend) to the left join. Change the WHERE to an AND. That should do the trick.


1

What you are going to want to do is group by, aggregates, and aggregates with some case statements. Something like this: SELECT Area, ProductCat, 1 AS NoOfProductCat, --It's always 1. Dont know what you want here... COUNT(Product_Attribute) AS NoOfAttribs, SUM(CASE WHEN Product_Attribue <= 30 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS expdate1, ...


1

You don't need a pivot if you only have two categories. Try case statements: Select employee as [Name] ,count(case when ContactType = 'Individual' and SpokeTo = 1 then LocationName end) * 100.0/ NULLIF(count(case when ContactType = 'Individual' then LocationName end), 0) as IndividualContacts ,count(case when ContactType = 'Location' and SpokeTo = 1 ...


1

I personally prefer the second method due to its simplicity. The issue here is mainly defense against SQL Injection Attacks. In both solutions you are using String parameters. An user could enter "= 1; Drop YourTable;" Im not too privy with VBA but I know in Java has "Prepared Statement" command which takes care of this. You should do some research on this ...


0

you can try this SELECT c.* FROM customer c LEFT JOIN payment p ON c.caseid = p.caseid AND (p.paymenttypeid NOT BETWEEN 9 AND 13 OR p.paymenttypeid IS NULL) WHERE LEFT(c.workercd,1) = 'V' AND c.enddate IS NULL AND p.caseid IS NULL


0

Try this... select c.caseid into #temp1 from customer c where left(c.workercd,1) = 'V' and c.enddate is null select c.caseid, p.* into #temp2 from customer c left outer join payment p on c.CaseID = p.caseid --inner join paymenttypelookup ptl on p.paymenttypeid = ptl.paymenttypeid where left(c.workercd,1) = 'V' and c.enddate is null and (p.paymenttypeid ...


1

The reason for the error is that your subquery is returning too many columns... to solve it change this: where temp.caseid not in (select c2.caseid, p.* from customer c2 to this: where temp.caseid not in (select c2.caseid from customer c2 Another option would be to use the except set operator which returns the set difference.


3

The computed column will keep your field up to date if the field data it is based on is changed. Adding just a default will update the field on insert if no value is provided for the field. If you know that your data is not going to change (which i think you are implying but did not specify in your question), then they are functionally the same for you. ...


2

You could switch to a "normal" column with a default value or insert trigger. The one potential issue is that unlike a computed column anyone with insert/update access could (potentially accidentally) change the value of the column. Performance is going to be the same either way. In essence that is what the db is doing behind the scenes with a persisted ...


0

There is no performance difference. However, in terms of database design it is more elegant when you have your pre-calculated column in the persisted view.


1

I second @GordonLinoff. Alternatively, you can write it like this - but performance will be the same. SELECT ( SELECT COUNT(1) FROM TB_A WITH(NOLOCK) WHERE TP = 2 AND A = 1 AND N = @N ) QTD_A, ( SELECT COUNT(1) QTD FROM TB_B WITH(NOLOCK) WHERE G = @G AND U = @U ) QTD_B, ...other 18 statements ...Note, there is no ...


-1

Overkill for the win. Use this script for smaller query or indexed query. I have put in the two option, one is to manually define the Riskid or uncomment the sql query to do a wildcard or enter in base on a selection. Create table #Risk (RID Int Identity,RiskID int) /* Manual Insert */ insert into #Risk select 111 insert into #Risk select 222 /* SQL ...


1

If you want to make your where clause case insensitive . convert left and right to the same case and then put condition . If I take table as mytable with attributes X and Y . where filter is on Y then select X , Y from mytable where UPPER(Y) = UPPER(@toSearch) or `select X , Y from mytable where LOWER(Y) = LOWER(@toSearch)`


1

I've found that a single huge query is typically bad for performance and that breaking it down into more manageable parts can help. Adding any covering or filtered indexes on what you're filtering by on the individual tables should help as well. Declare @AQTD int,@BQTD int Select @AQTD=COUNT(1) FROM TB_A WITH(NOLOCK) WHERE TP = 2 AND A = 1 AND N = @N ...


3

Your queries are fine (I would use an explicit CROSS JOIN rather than ,, because I abhor commas in the FROM clause). For performance, two indexes would help: tb_a(TP, A, N) and tb_b(G, U).


1

A simple solution might be to convert both the search string and the column you are searching on to lowercase using the LOWER() function in SQL Server. Something like: SELECT whatever FROM yourTable WHERE LOWER(whatever) = LOWER(@searchString)


1

I just incorporated the SELECT with a CASE statement (For my situation Monday marked the first day of the week, and didn't want to deal with the SET DATEFIRST command: CASE DATEPART(dw,<YourDateTimeField>) WHEN 1 THEN CONVERT(char(10), DATEADD(DD, -6, <YourDateTimeField>),126) + ' to ' + CONVERT(char(10), <YourDateTimeField>,126) ...


3

I would just use like with a case: select trace, count(*) from (select l.*, (case when trace like 'MyApp.MyCustomException: UserId % not found' then 'MyApp.MyCustomException: UserId not found' when trace like 'MyApp.MyCustomException: UserId % login failed' then 'MyApp.MyCustomException: ...


1

From your description I guess your table looks something like this: create table people ( bio_id int identity(1,1), cardholder_index int, bio_complete_date date, bmi int, body_fat int ) If so, one way (of many) to do the query would be to use correlated queries to pull the latest non-null value for the cardholder_index, either ...


0

This may look quite ugly, but it should be relatively efficient. I use replace to get rid of numbers and extra spaces before grouping. Check it out: WITH yourTable AS ( SELECT * FROM ( VALUES ('MyApp.MyCustomException: UserId 1 not found'), ('MyApp.MyCustomException: UserId 2 not found'), ...


0

Here's how to normalize your data which will make querying it MUCH simpler. Using your table definition, I inserted your data INSERT INTO test(Datedif,hour1,subject1,faculty1,hour2,subject2,faculty2,hour3,subject3,faculty3,batch) VALUES ('30-06-2015',1,'Maths','Kevin',1,'Maths','Kevin',1,'Science','Amal','BBA'), ...


3

You could try using patindex('%pattern%',column) The whole select could be something like SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE patindex('%MyApp.MyCustomException: % not found%',err)>0 Make sure not to forget the % before and after the end of the pattern. The function will give you the position the pattern was found in a column or 0 if not found. See here for ...


0

We can use the LEAD() function introduced in SQL 2012. --setup CREATE TABLE #temp(ueln bigint, ownerid nvarchar(20), [date] date) INSERT INTO #temp(ueln, ownerid, [date]) VALUES (191001180010389, N'017581', N'1989-06-30 00:00:00.000'), (191001180010389, N'017747', N'2011-06-02 00:00:00.000'), (191001180010389, N'017992', N'2014-03-25 ...


0

This might be a starting point for your table design: declare @tbFaculty table ( FacultyID int --identity(1,1) primary key , Name varchar(50) ) insert into @tbFaculty ( FacultyID, Name ) values ( 1, 'Kevin' ) , ( 2, 'Amal' ) declare @tbBatch table( BatchID int --identity(1,1) primary key , Name char(3) ) insert into ...


1

Use STUFF SELECT CashSheetSessionID, BankingSlipNumber = STUFF((SELECT ', ' + BankingSlipNumber FROM BankingSlips b WHERE b.CashSheetSessionID = a.CashSheetSessionID FOR XML PATH('')), 1, 2, '') FROM BankingSlips a GROUP BY CashSheetSessionID Output: CashSheetSessionID BankingSlipNumber 10 abcabc, ...


0

You can try the following: -- Create demo data CREATE TABLE #temp(ueln bigint, ownerid nvarchar(20), date date, rn int) INSERT INTO #temp(ueln, ownerid, date, rn) VALUES (191001180010389,N'017581', N'1989-06-30 00:00:00.000', 1), (191001180010389,N'017747', N'2011-06-02 00:00:00.000', 2), (191001180010389,N'017992', N'2014-03-25 ...


3

select u1.*, u2.date as [date to] from tabl u1 left join tabl u2 on u1.UELN = u2.UELN and u2.rn = u1.rn + 1 You just need a left self join The left part is what gets the null date for the no match


2

Using OUTER APPLY: SELECT t.UELN, t.OwnerID, DateFrom = t.[Date], DateTo = x.DateTo FROM tbl t OUTER APPLY( SELECT DateTo = [Date] FROM tbl WHERE UELN = t.UELN AND rn = t.rn + 1 )x


1

If you are only ever going to have the same 4 things, you could use a query such as this to produce your output: CREATE TABLE #DemoTable (DataTitle VARCHAR(10), DataValue VARCHAR(10), Id INT) INSERT INTO #DemoTable (DataTitle, DataValue, Id) VALUES ('Thing 1', 'Data 1', '12345'),('Thing 2', 'Data 2', '12345'),('Thing 3', 'Data 3', '12345'),('Thing 4', ...


0

You could use common table expressions to build up the missing datasets, i.e. your complete Person table, then join that to your Detail table as follows; declare @n int; -- set your default PersonID here; set @n = 123; -- Make sure previous SQL statement is terminated with semilcolon for with clause to parse successfully. -- First build our unique list of ...


2

If you only want information on system 21, you need a WHERE clause, not a CASE expression: Select DATEADD (HOUR,DATEDIFF (HOUR,0,TimeStamp),0) [Date], Count(CurUSSDCnt) as Sys21 from table where System= 21 group by DATEADD (HOUR,DATEDIFF (HOUR,0,TimeStamp),0) order by [Date]; If you want more systems, then either use the manual pivotting shown in ...


1

you should put count outside CASE like this. This will show all Hours even where System= 21 record does not exists. also I changed COUNT to SUM. Select DATEADD (HOUR,DATEDIFF (HOUR,0,TimeStamp),0) [Date], SUM(Case when System= 21 then CurUSSDCnt else 0 end) as Sys21 from table group by DATEADD (HOUR,DATEDIFF (HOUR,0,TimeStamp),0) order by DATEADD ...


0

CREATE PROC SP_EMPLOYEE --By Using TYPE parameter and CASE in Stored procedure (@TYPE INT) AS BEGIN IF @TYPE=1 BEGIN SELECT DESIGID,DESIGNAME FROM GP_DESIGNATION END IF @TYPE=2 BEGIN SELECT ID,NAME,DESIGNAME, case D.ISACTIVE when 'Y' then 'ISACTIVE' when 'N' then 'INACTIVE' else 'not' end as ACTIVE FROM GP_EMPLOYEEDETAILS ED ...


0

I modified the code that @amcdermott with the following to try to eradicate the duplication that separate date and time fields seemed to be causing: SELECT tTMPO.[OperationRecordID] , tTMPO.[CasenoteNumber] , tTMPO.[DateTimeBooked] , tSPPS.[StartDate] /* , AEAdm.[Visit Date] , AEAdm.[Visit Time]*/ , MAX (CONVERT(DATETIME, ...


3

it should be like: case when @LEquipe is null and @LeCollaborateur is not null then @LeCollaborateur = [Collaborateur].[User] when @LEquipe is not null then @LEquipe =[Collaborateur].id_equipe_fk end Use this Code: CREATE PROCEDURE SP_Passed_Time_Day -- Add the parameters for the stored procedure here @LaDate date , ...


1

Try this: case when @LEquipe is null and @LeCollaborateur is not null then @LeCollaborateur = [Collaborateur].[User] case when @LEquipe is not null then @LEquipe =[Collaborateur].id_equipe_fk end


1

Select t1.year,t1.Id,t1.Activity,t1.Name,t2.Grade FROM table1 t1 INNER JOIN table2 t2 ON t2.year=t1.year AND t2.Id=t1.Id


-1

Use JOIN: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/craigfr/archive/2006/07/19/671712.aspx And UPDATE statement: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms177523.aspx Hope this helps!


1

Because the query in SSRS needs to be DML (Data Manipulation Language) ie select * from ... or exec dbo.prcGetMyData ... That sort of thing... But you are trying to enter DDL (Data Definition Language) ie you're attempting to change the underlying database, which would be somewhat of a security issue if this were permissible. you could just ...


2

You don't need to do a CROSS JOIN because that will give you a Cartesian product. You can use a LEFT JOIN (or if you're sure there will always be a match in your table variable you can use an INNER JOIN as it will be slightly faster). Like this: SELECT FirstName, LastName, Email, tblSum.Amount FROM tblMembers LEFT JOIN ( SELECT email, SUM(Amount) AS ...


-1

// hashmap_overview.jsl import java.util.*; public class Program { public static void main(String[] args) { // Create a HashMap with three key/value pairs. HashMap hm = new HashMap(); hm.put("One", "1"); hm.put("Two", "2a"); hm.put("Two", "2b"); hm.put("Three", "3"); // Iterate over the ...


1

If you're wanting to do this Server Side, I think you're looking for C# Dictionary class. https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xfhwa508(v=vs.110).aspx In ASP.NET especially if this is for caching purposes you should probably be looking at using the ASP.NET Cache https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa478965.aspx


1

Change this part From INSERT INTO [Test].[dbo].[TestTbl] ([id],[Agent_id]) VALUES ('','$agent') To INSERT INTO [Test].[dbo].[TestTbl] ([Agent_id]) VALUES ('$agent') When it's auto increment, you don't' need to specify that in your INSERT statement. Also do not SET IDENTITY_INSERT to OFF when you want to use auto increment feature of your ...


0

It easy and efficient if you use a table of numbers. Here is a good article describing how to generate it. For this example I populate it on the fly, but in production I have a permanent table with 100K rows. It is useful in many reports. DECLARE @Numbers TABLE (Number int PRIMARY KEY); INSERT INTO @Numbers (Number) SELECT TOP(100) ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER ...



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