New answers tagged

0

If I understood what you want, then you can use correlated sub query to get the sum, like this: SELECT t.i,t.s, (select sum(s.v) from #temp s where s.i = t.i and s.s <= t.s) as new_v FROM #temp t


0

I think you can use a query like this: UPDATE #Users SET suggestions = ( SELECT id, score FROM (SELECT *, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY id ORDER BY ord) As seq FROM ( SELECT c.value('@id', 'INT') AS id, c.value('@score', 'INT') AS score, 1 As ord ...


0

Well, the answer was pretty basic. @Felix and @TT had the right suggestion. Thanks! I put a non-clustered index on the NameID field in ydata.dbo.entity. if not exists (select 1 from ydata.dbo.entity where NameID = @CurrentName) So it can now process the NOT EXISTS part quickly using the index instead of scanning the entire dbo.entity ...


1

How about something along the lines of SELECT * FROM MessageData WHERE messageID in (SELECT messageID FROM SELECT Max(sentDate), Max(messageID) messageID FROM MessageData m1 INNER JOIN MessageData m2 ON m1.fromUserId = m2.toUserId OR m2.fromUserId = m1.toUserId GROUP BY sentDate, MessageID ) ?


3

You can use row_nubmer with case logic to get the smallest and largest user ids: select m.* from (select m.*, row_number() over (partition by (case when fromuserid < touserid then fromuserid else touserid end), (case when fromuserid < touserid then touserid else fromuserid end) ...


0

For Oracle SQL, SUBSTR(column_name, -# of characters requested) will extract last three characters for a given query. e.g.SELECT SUBSTR(description,-3) FROM student.course;


0

What you are attempting CANNOT be achieved using a "computed column". A computed column is computed from an expression that can use other columns in the same table. The expression can be a noncomputed column name, constant, function, and any combination of these connected by one or more operators, but the expression cannot be a subquery. Kun Cheng ...


0

For SQL Server 2012 and higher, an alternative is to use the FORMAT function to enclose a negative number in parentheses. A small limitation is that you will need to specify a maximum number of decimal places. WITH T AS ( SELECT -1361236.75886298 AS N UNION ALL SELECT -2000 UNION ALL SELECT 2000 ) SELECT FORMAT ( N, ...


1

This code provides a pattern that you can extend to handle the whitespace of your choice for a modified LTRIM. declare @Tab as NVarChar(1) = NChar( 9 ); declare @Space as NVarChar(1) = NChar( 32 ); declare @Samples as Table ( String NVarChar(16) ); insert into @Samples ( String ) values ( 'Foo' ), ( @Tab + 'Foo' ), ( @Space + 'Foo' ), ( @Space + ...


1

I'll be interested to see if anyone finds a generic SQL solution. The best I can come up with is a simple REPLACE function: SELECT MyString = LEFT(MyString, LEN(RTRIM(REPLACE(REPLACE(REPLACE(MyString COLLATE Latin1_General_100_BIN2, NCHAR(9), ' '), NCHAR(12), ' '), NCHAR(13), ' ')))) AS RTrimmed SELECT MyString = RIGHT(MyString, ...


2

You forgot dataReader.Read(). Until you don't execute Read() on a data reader, the data is not available.


5

Good question. Although there are many whitespace characters defined in Unicode, only a space (0x0020) is removed: with Characters as ( select NChar( 0 ) as Character union all select NChar( Unicode( Character ) + 1 ) from Characters where Unicode( Character ) < 65535 ), CharacterMap as ( select Unicode( Character ) as [UnicodePoint], ...


1

One way of doing it is by the use of CROSS APPLY: select emp.empid, emp.firstname, emp.mgrid, manager.firstname as manager_name, x.cnt as Total from Employees AS emp inner join Employees as manager on emp.mgrid = manager.empid cross apply ( select count(*) from Employees AS e where e.mgrid = emp.mgrid) AS x(cnt) Demo here Edit: You can ...


1

First, can you avoid the cursor? If so, rewrite the code in a set based manner (operate on many rows all at once, not one at a time). Second, if you can't, can you use a LOCAL FAST_FORWARD cursor? Third, you are correct - you definitely need to deallocate the cursor. Fourth, you're putting multiple rows into a @table variable, which doesn't have ...


1

The scope of a table variable is with in the specific batch. So you don't have to explicitly do anything to drop/deallocate the space occupied by table variable. The space occupied by the table variable will be automatically dropped in the end of batch where it got created


0

Let me add my two cents here. I will try to explain your code line by line. It is TSQL so it will be processed in a procedural way. You have: 1- declare @loginId nvarchar(50) 2- set @loginId = null 3- 4- select * 5- from loginusers 6- where LoginId = @loginId 7- OR @loginId is null The first line (1) you defined the variable @loginId and its ...


0

"if @loginId is null then the where clause doesn't apply" Yes, that's what this is doing. I use a similar approach for stored procedures with several parameters, where one or more of them might have a NULL value (I try to stick to less than 5 as a rule of thumb, otherwise it becomes a candidate for dynamic SQL instead). For example: SELECT * FROM ...


0

Well, the code first sets the variable @loginId to null, and later the where accepts all rows with some condition or @loginId is null, so there you have it...


1

For anyone else looking for the same here is what i did DECLARE @Contador INT DECLARE @start TIME DECLARE @end TIME DECLARE @request INT DECLARE @Max INT DECLARE @Libres TABLE(Id INT,startTime TIME, endTime TIME) DECLARE @Result TABLE(Id INT,Horario VARCHAR(8)) SET @Contador = 1 INSERT INTO @Libres VALUES (1,'08:00:00.0000000','10:00:00.0000000'); INSERT ...


0

A. I don't see anywhere in your code where you are passing the @PartnerId value. Your QAs object in your AJAX doesn't have that part. Answering your questions: Your sproc should change a bit to accommodate a null @AnswerId. CREATE PROC AddOrUpdateAnswer { @PartnerId UNIQUEIDENTIFIER, @QuestionId INT, @AnswerId INT = NULL, @AnswerVal INT = ...


0

That SQL is not bad, but it could be better. You could be using a MERGE statement, which is commonly known as an upsert ("Update or Insert"). However, if you have a lot of answers to insert, I would suggest you use a table valued parameter (TVP) to pass all your records at once to SQL Server. Usually you're connection would be wrapped in a using statement ...


1

Here CASE WHEN ((('MARKET VALUE') < (C.SETTLEBalance * 1.40)) You are comparing the varchar value "MARKET VALUE" against a numeric value. what do you expect? Might be, that you should put the closing paranthesis right behind "A.BegSdQuantity", don't know what data types are there...: CONVERT(DECIMAL(25,3),A.BegSdQuantity) * B.ClosePrice But without ...


1

EDIT: Here is a solution with quarters of an hour, coming back with all quarters without working activities... DECLARE @empl TABLE(ID INT, EmplName VARCHAR(100)); INSERT INTO @empl VALUES (1,'Mr. X'); DECLARE @emplStandard TABLE(emplID INT, StartHour TIME, EndHour TIME); INSERT INTO @emplStandard VALUES (1,{t'08:00:00'},{t'17:00:00'}); DECLARE @Work ...


1

If you're using sql, you can use a LIKE to identify that there is a date in a string: SELECT * FROM Table WHERE Value LIKE '% %/%/% %' Each "%" matches one or more character. If you want to extract the first date, it might be possible with a case statement. See: TSQL CASE with if comparison in SELECT statement


2

Ok This will work somewhat or at least its a good place to start: you can find out more about string functions here DECLARE @ST VARCHAR(MAX) = 'The rain in Spain falls mainly on 1/1/2015 and then it ends between 03/02/2015 and 04/01/2015' SELECT SUBSTRING(@ST,PATINDEX ( '%[0-9]%/%[0-9]/%[0-9]%' , @ST ),PATINDEX ('%[A-Z]%', SUBSTRING(@ST,PATINDEX ( ...


0

Without any expected output and a faulty PIVOT query, I'm just guessing as to what you want. But here is a script that works based loosely on your question. I'm guessing it's not the output you want, but you can work from this script and maybe turn it into something you need. CREATE TABLE #Tableabc(ID INT,name VARCHAR(256), Steps ...


0

Consider a LEFT JOIN on a table3 self join using the SUBSTRING() value: SELECT table1.SALES_DATA, table2.PRODUCT_DATA, table3.NAME_CATEGORY, levelsub.NAME_CATEGORY AS LOWER_LEVEL_CATEGORY FROM db.table1 INNER JOIN db.table2 ON table1.ID_PRODUCT = table2.ID_PRODUCT INNER JOIN db.table3 ON table2.ID_CATEGORY = ...


0

The solution to this issue was two fold. First I needed to make sure that when new Things (such as a new Armor in the REF_Armor table) are added that a new row is added to the Tracing table that has the ParentID NULL. That is done as follows: Dim WorldID_Orig As Integer = MySession.World.ID Dim Name As String = "Create " & ...


1

In order to get the timespan between events, you need to number all operations sequentially (one increments without leftout), and then join that on itself with an offset of 1. You'll get n-1 rows as result with the timespan inbetween. Something like this: WITH cteOps AS ( SELECT ROWNUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY servicereqno ORDER BY updateddate) seqid, ...


2

you can just JOIN (or LEFT JOIN) since you're doing TOP 1 SELECT TOP 1 t1.Col1, t1.Col2, t3.Col3, t3.Col4 FROM t1 LEFT OUTER JOIN t2 ON t1.Id = t2.Id LEFT OUTER JOIN t3 ON t3.Id = 'z' WHERE t1.Id = 'x' ORDER BY t2.Col2 DESC


0

You could try this to return the phone number, the day of the week and a 2 hour slot. If the volume of calls is greater than 20 the value is set to 5 (not sure why to 5?). The code for the 2 hour section is adapted from this question How to Round a Time in T-SQL where the value 2 in (24/2) is the number of hours in your time period. SELECT ...


0

SQL Server provides a built-in DATEDIFF function, which you can use to find the difference between two dates. Furthermore, SQL Server has a built-in AVG function that you can use to calculate the average of a set of values..


0

you can use this as exameple : select t1.ks, t1.[# Tasks], coalesce(t2.[# Late], 0) as [# Late] from (SELECT ks, COUNT() AS '# Tasks' FROM Table GROUP BY ks) t1 left join (SELECT ks, COUNT() AS '# Late' FROM Table WHERE Age > Palt GROUP BY ks) t2 on t1.ks = t2.ks


1

If the additional query simply returns one row, you can use a CROSS JOIN to append it to your original query: SELECT TOP 1 t1.Col1, t1.Col2, t3.Col3, t3.Col4 FROM t1 LEFT OUTER JOIN t2 ON t1.Id = t2.Id CROSS JOIN ( SELECT t3.Col3, t3.Col4 FROM t3 WHERE t3.Id = 'z') AS t3(Col3, Col4) WHERE t1.Id = 'x' ORDER BY t2.Col2 DESC


0

With two assumptions from your question you could do this pretty easily. It looks like your numbers are all 10 characters long, and they only have numerics (no characters). With this in mind you could just do this with a pattern match like so: SELECT CASE WHEN [Value] LIKE '%[0-9]%' THEN SUBSTRING([Value], PATINDEX('%[0-9]%', [Value]), 10) ELSE ...


0

NOLOCK is often exploited as a magic way to speed up database reads, but I try to avoid using it whever possible. The result set can contain rows that have not yet been committed, that are often later rolled back. An error or Result set can be empty, be missing rows or display the same row multiple times. This is because other transactions are moving data ...


0

You can use DATEPART Function to get week day slot. To calculate time slot you can try dividing number of minutes from beginning of day and dividing it by size of the time slot. It would return you slot number. You can use either CASE statement to translate it to proper string or look table where you can store slot descriptions. SELECT PhoneNumber ...


0

Look That: Concatenate Rows Maybe give you a way.


1

Disclaimer: I'm the owner of the project Eval SQL.NET on GitHub There is no "eval" method in SQL however this can be easily done using Eval SQL.NET Library. -- CREATE expression DECLARE @sqlnet SQLNET = SQLNET::New('A+B') -- EVALUATE expression from a table SELECT @sqlnet.SetValue('A', A).SetValue('B', B).Eval() FROM tbl_temp Documentation: Dynamically ...


2

If you are using an ADO recordset, which I suspect you are, you must use a static or keyset cursor type, if you want to access the RecordCount property. Take from MSDN The cursor type of the Recordset object affects whether the number of records can be determined. The RecordCount property will return -1 for a forward-only cursor; the actual count ...


0

The accepted answer is incorrect. It will fail to give the correct answer for 116060 which should be 29th February 2016. Instead it returns 1st March 2016. JDE seems to store dates as integers, so rather than converting from strings I always go direct from the integer: DATEADD(DAY, @Julian % 1000, DATEADD(YEAR, @Julian / 1000, '31-dec-1899')) To go from ...


0

Try using a simple join: DECLARE @t table(tarstamp int, oristamp int) INSERT @t values (1,1), (1,1), (1,2), (2,2) SELECT t1.* FROM @t t1 INNER JOIN @t t2 ON t1.oristamp = t2.oristamp WHERE t1.tarstamp <> t2.tarstamp


-1

Code is below: set datefirst 7 declare @dt datetime='29/04/2016 00:00:00' select (day(@dt)+datepart(WEEKDAY,dateadd(d,-day(@dt),@dt+1)))/7


1

Cross join and inner join are the same with the only difference that in inner join we booleanly filter some of the outcomes of the cartesian product table1 x--------------------------------------x | fieldA | fieldB | fieldC | x----------|-------------|-------------x | A | B | option1 | | A | B1 | ...


0

In your case, using MIN and MAX aggregate functions will perform better as COUNT(DISTINCT oristamp) > 1 adds complexity to the execution plan: SELECT tarstamp FROM mytable GROUP BY tarstamp HAVING MIN(oristamp) != MAX(oristamp)


2

To get fully elastic solution you should search for dynamic pivot. If you know years in advance you could use: ;WITH cte AS ( SELECT ReqId,quater1,quater2,quater3,quater4 ,[q1] = CONCAT('Q1_',[year]) ,[q2] = CONCAT('Q2_',[year]) ,[q3] = CONCAT('Q3_',[year]) ,[q4] = CONCAT('Q4_',[year]) FROM #forecast ) SELECT ReqId ...


2

I hope I understand the question. I am assuming you want all rows where more than 1 distinct value for tarstamp exists for each oristamp. DECLARE @t table(tarstamp int, oristamp int) INSERT @t values (1,1), (1,1), (1,2), (2,2) ;WITH CTE as ( SELECT *, max(tarstamp) over (partition by oristamp) mx, min(tarstamp) over (partition by oristamp) mn ...


1

Use a sub-query to find oristamp values having at least two different tarstamp values. Join with that sub-query: select t1.* from tablename t1 join (select oristamp from tablename group by oristamp having count(distinct tarstamp) >= 2) t2 on t1.oristamp = t2.oristamp


0

Try this query, which will return all those combination which contain different oristamp. select distinct z.* from ( select oristamp, count(*) ct from mytable Group by oristamp )z, ( Select oristamp, tarstamp, count(*) ct from mytable Group by oristamp, tarstamp )y Where z.oristamp =y.oristamp And z.ct != y.ct


0

You could count the number of different oristamps per tarstamp and select the rows that have tarstamps with more than one oristamp, E.g.: SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE tarstamp IN (SELECT tarstamp FROM mytable GROUP BY tarstamp HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT oristamp) > 1)



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