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tkRAD supports python 2 and 3 and looks very mature https://pypi.python.org/pypi/tkRAD/1.6.5


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Your question doesn't mention it, but you should also have a "vista" theme available. Try using that theme. You might also try not setting the theme, and rely on the default (which I think should be "vista"). To address your specific questions: Is there a known problem of Python 2.7's module ttk not playing nice under Windows 8.1? Not that I am aware ...


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Based upon the @Eric Levieil's link above, it was as simple as adding this to my code: self.progress.progress_frame.update() Full change: class Checklist: def __init__(self, master, var): self.progress = ProgressTrack(master, 0, 5, 'Microsoft Word') while var: #MY OTHER CODE self.progress.progress_bar.step() ...


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You have to know that tkinter is single threaded. Also the window (and all you see on the screen) updates its appearance only when idle (doing nothing) or when you call w.update_idletasks() where w is any widget. This means when you are in a loop, changing a progress bar, nothing will happen on the screen until the loop is finished. So your new code could ...


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It looks like you just want to change the trough for a horizontal scrollbar under the Windows theme. The ttk widgets are constructed from a set of elements provided by a styling engine and combined using the declared layout. Under Windows the styling engine is the Windows Visual Styles API which means the programmer doesn't have any control over the colours ...


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The Tk themeing system redefines widgets in terms of separate visual elements that are composed together using a layout and style configuration options to yield a visual representation of the widget that depends on the chosen theme and the widget state. This allows Tk to request that the Windows Visual Styles API be used to draw certain elements so that we ...


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The layout for the TFrame does not include a padding element so there is no style element to make use of the configured padding value in your style. You can see this by inspecting the layout: >>> from tkinter import * >>> from tkinter.ttk import * >>> style = Style() >>> style.theme_use('default') # select the Unix theme ...


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The point of the ttk theming support is to get the system provided theming engine to draw the various elements that make up a Tk widget so that we match the current UI's look and feel. In the case of the Notebook Tab on Windows Vista or above that means the 'vsapi' engine is being used to draw the elements. The tab is an element and it's look is provided by ...


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I was having the same problem. What I found is the 'select' method for notebooks (ttk.Notebook.select(someTabFrame)) solves this problem: import ttk, Tkinter mainWindow = Tkinter.Tk() mainFrame = Tkinter.Frame(mainWindow, name = 'main-frame') mainFrame.pack(fill = Tkinter.BOTH) # fill both sides of the parent nb = ttk.Notebook(mainFrame, name = 'nb') ...


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If you use ttk.Button, it absolutely will use the ttk button. It can't possibly do anything else because you're explicitly saying to use the Button class from the ttk module. Note: Depending on what platform you're on, the tk and ttk buttons may look identical. Other than the way you do the imports, there's virtually no difference between tkinter in ...


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Instead of Tkinter/Tix, you could use PyQT/PySide. An example of how to create a tree view with checkboxes is given here, or here is my slightly altered version, which only requires pip to run: import pip try: import PySide.QtGui as gui except ImportError: pip.main(['install', 'PySide']) import PySide.QtGui as gui import PySide.QtCore as core ...


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This problem also exists in tcl/Tk. The answer proposed there is to bind to the Entry's <Expose> event and unbind that afterwards. I've tried to rewrite that to Python / tkinter: def xview_event_handler(e): e.widget.update_idletasks() e.widget.xview_moveto(1) e.widget.unbind('<Expose>') a = Tk() text = StringVar(a, ...



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