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4

It sounds like you're using twisted.conch.client.direct.SSHClientFactory and twisted.conch.client.direct.SSHClientTransport. These classes are most directly intended to be used to implement the conch command line tool. This means they're fairly useful for building an SSH client, since that's exactly what conch is. However, they're also somewhat less ...


3

Yes, you need to make a checker. But there are building blocks you can use within Conch that should make it pretty easy. Ying Li has an example project, "ess" ("SSH" without the "SH") that implements some checkers that you might be interested in checking out.


3

The reason why ssh localhost -p 12345 print 'Hello world' fails is that "print 'Hello world'" is sent as "exec" request that is supposed to execute command. Your server (manhole) does not support that (obviously). You need to feed python interpreter standard input instead. For example: ssh -tt localhost -p 12345 << EOS print "Hello world" EOS Note -...


3

I don't really believe an SSH server will ever be 'simple'. But I did get an SSH honeypot running a while back using python 2.7 on Ubuntu 12.04 LTS Server. You can see the code to it with my changes at https://github.com/hydrogen18/kojoney It uses twisted.


3

There are two extra callbacks you might want to implement for this. These are callbacks on the channel, so you're pretty close already. The first is request_exit_status. Once you implement this, Conch will no longer log that the exit-status request is unhandled. Here's an example implementation: def request_exit_status(self, data): """ When the ...


2

I wonder if an endpoint for tunneling traffic from the ssh server onwards would make sense? It would make a lot of sense. There is an endpoint that connects a protocol to the stdio of a command running remotely using Conch - twisted.conch.endpoints.SSHCommandClientEndpoint. And development has started (but stalled, it seems) on an endpoint for connecting ...


1

Fixed in ClientUserAuth class: def getPublicKey(self): return keys.Key.fromFile(public_key_file) instead def getPublicKey(self): return keys.Key.fromFile(public_key_file).keyObject and def getPrivateKey(self): return defer.succeed(keys.Key.fromFile(private_key_file)) instead def getPrivateKey(self): return defer.succeed(keys.Key....


1

I run into the same problem. I'm convinced its a bug that sendDisconnect() does not call parent implementation. Calling loseConnection() on SSHClientTransport does not close the TCP connection for me, which I can see using lsof -p PID. To fix this problem I use my own connect() method, to inject my own implementation of SSHClientTransport. The problem is ...


1

Excellent question; thanks for asking (and thanks for using Twisted, and doing TDD :-)). HistoricRecvLine is a TerminalProtocol, which provides ITerminalProtocol. ITerminalProtocol.makeConnection must be called with a provider of an ITerminalTransport. On the other hand, your unit test is calling your ShellProtocol.makeConnection with an instance of ...


1

Yes, it absolutely can. From a Twisted perspective, there is a support for pretty much everything you ask for - SFTP, FTPS, HTTPS and scheduling. When it comes to database integration, I would use standard Python db libraries. I don't think you need anything special from Twisted for that. Scheduled tasks could be accomplished through either Python ...



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