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9

Protocol.connectionLost is the only way to know when the connection no longer exists. It is also called at the earliest time when it is known that the connection no longer exists. It is obvious to you or me that disconnecting your network adapter (ie, turning off your wifi card) will break the connection - at least, if you leave it off or if you configure ...


8

I'd recommend looking into twistd. That way you don't have to worry about handling any of the start up, pid file management, etc. The documentation on their site is quite good: http://twistedmatrix.com/documents/current/core/howto/basics.html. Also check http://twistedmatrix.com/documents/current/core/howto/tap.html for how to implement the application ...


5

This is very similar to a question answered in the Twisted FAQ. Essentially, you need to make the protocol instances created by your factory accessible to the resources that make up your web server. A simple way to do this is to have your factory keep a list of protocol instances (read about buildProtocol if you haven't yet) and then pass the factory ...


5

Because these tracebacks are written using a call to twisted.python.log.deferr() (in Twisted 10.2 anyway), it is possible to redirect them using a log observer. This is the most common thing to do with these stack traces. I can't find any base class for log observers (surprisingly) but there are a couple built in: twisted.python.log.PythonLoggingObserver ...


5

That's because self.factory does not contain the numProtocols attribute. To customise the protocol's factory you create a Factory for your protocol by subclassing twisted.internet.protocol.Factory. Example: from twisted.internet.protocol import Protocol, Factory from twisted.internet import reactor class Echo(Protocol): # ... your implementation as ...


4

You might not have the permission to execute '/var/projects/python/worker.py', or that script's execute bit is not set. Do an ls -l /var/projects/python/worker.py and check it?


4

Please correct me if I am wrong folks. So basically what i want to understand and confirm is Deferred objects are triggered one after the other whereas the deferToThread are run parallely as by the name thread. This isn't exactly right but it's sort of close. Here is the code that triggers your Deferreds: d1.callback('a') d2.callback('a') ...


3

Add an errback to the Deferred returned by LoopingCall.start which at least logs whatever error is happening. LoopingCall stops once its callable raises an exception. Adding an errback will show you what the exception is and give you a place to put some code to restart the LoopingCall.


3

You can add an errback to the deferred; unhandled exceptions are automatically converted to twisted.python.failure.Failure.


3

You're already doing it... sort of. Your problem here is that time.sleep() is a blocking call, and will therefore make your whole server stop. If you're using that as a stand-in for something that does network I/O (like urllib), the best option is usually to do the I/O with Twisted (like twisted.web.client.getPage) rather than to try to do something to the ...


3

I think you already have the general idea of the solution here, since you already applied it to an interaction between Receiver and DetectorService. The idea is for your objects to have references to other objects which let them do what they need to do. So, consider a web service that responds to requests with a result based on the beats data: from ...


3

What you are doing wrong is running a blocking call (time.sleep(2)), while Twisted expects you to only perform non-blocking operations. Things that don't wait. Because you have that time.sleep(2) in there, Twisted can't do anything else while that function is sleeping. So it can't send any data to the browser, either. In the case of time.sleep(2), you would ...


3

The above two answers are correct. However, considering that you've already implemented a spelling server then run it as one. You can start by running it on the same machine as a separate process - at localhost:PORT. Right now it seems you have a very simple binary protocol interface already - you can implement an equally simple Python client using the ...


3

reactor.run() should be called only once in your whole program. Don't think of it as "start this one request I have", think of it as "start all of Twisted". Running the reactor in a background thread is one way to get around this; then your django application can use blockingCallFromThread in your Django application and use a Twisted API as you would any ...


3

Protocols, like SpellClient, have access to their factory as self.factory. ...so there would be a number of ways to do this, but one way would be to create another method on SpellFactory, such as setQuery, and then access that from the client... #...in SpellFactory: def setQuery(self, query): self.query = query #...and in SpellClient: def ...


3

class ChatServer(Protocol): def connectionMade(self): print("A Client Has Connected") factory = Factory() reactor.listenTCP(80,factory) You haven't made any association between factory and ChatServer in this code. Try inserting this line: factory.protocol = ChatServer In an upcoming (not yet released) version of Twisted, Factory is getting ...


3

You have to send a finger request to the server before it responds. According to the finger rfc: Send a single "command line", ending with <CRLF>. The command line: Systems may differ in their interpretations of this line. However, the basic scheme is straightforward: if the line is null (i.e. just a <CRLF> is sent) then the ...


3

You need to define "succeeded" in order to come up with an answer to this. All sendLine does immediately (probably) is add some bytes to a send buffer. In some sense, as long as it doesn't raise an exception (eg, MemoryError because your line is too long or TypeError because your line was the number 3 instead of an actual line) it has succeeded. That's ...


3

You do not state which reactor you are using, but this page says ReactorBase is the base class for Reactors. Also on the same page, it mentions an instance variable running that is further explained here. It says running = A bool which is True from during startup to during shutdown and False the rest of the time. With that information we can change ...


3

Translating the question Many of the specifics in your question don't make sense, so I'm translating your question into: I have a twisted python standalone program which runs on port 8080, and i have written a different standalone program which runs on this server. I want both programs to run on a single port no. When i try to use same port for all ...


3

The issue is that as the method_one is deferred, so, instead of calling set_self_value right away it first moves on to the next step a.method_two(), hence as at that time the value is not yet set you get an empty list. To make sure method_two is called after method_one add it to the callback chain: import twisted from twisted.internet import utils from ...


2

You don't quite understand how the Twisted reactor works. reactor.run() is starting up the reactor's event-loop --- it's a blocking call that loops "forever". See http://twistedmatrix.com/documents/10.2.0/core/howto/reactor-basics.html for various reactor-related topics.


2

You can do it using numpy: import numpy mode = numpy.int8(42) # int8 Byte (-128 to 127) You can find more information for types and conversions between types using numpy here.


2

Ubuntu 10.04 includes Twisted 10.0.0, but the twisted.internet.endpoints module was introduced in Twisted 10.1.0. You can find more recent versions on the twistedmatrix.com or the PYPI Twisted project page. Once you have a more recent version installed, here is the import path to the TCP4ServerEndpoint class: from twisted.internet.endpoints import ...


2

Here's a pretty good explanation: http://blackjml.livejournal.com/23029.html


2

That documentation is probably out of date. The main limitation of the IOCP reactor was the lack of SSL support, which was addressed 4 years ago. Many people have been using it successfully for a long time; it shouldn't be described as "experimental".


2

Call transport.getPeerCertificate in Protocol.dataReceived or another protocol method (only after you have received some data).


2

There are some tools in Twisted that will help you do this more easily. For example, cooperate: from twisted.internet.task import cooperate def generate_update_deferreds(collection, many_docs): for doc in update_docs: d = collection.update({'_id': doc['_id']}, doc, upsert=True) yield d work = generate_update_deferreds(...) ...


2

You indented content = a[1] line incorrectly. You need more space(s)! :)


2

There's a difference between shutting down a service and stopping a reactor. You should be able to test most of the desired behavior with myservice.stopService. To test the code that actually initiates the shutdown, just mock out reactor.stop with self.patch(reactor, 'stop', mock.Mock()), and later assert that it was called. If you want to link the two, ...



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