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2

The problem here is that the += increments the value on the instance rather than on the class itself (meaning that after you use +=, the instance now has a count of 2, but the class-level variable has the original count). To fix the issue, you just need to increment the value on the type (i.e., the class level dictionary) vs. the instance. Here's a minimal ...


2

One way to do this is to use the AcceptableCiphers.fromOpenSSLCipherString constructor. from twisted.internet.ssl import AcceptableCiphers cipherListString = "KRB5-IDEA-CBC-SHA,SEED-SHA".replace(",", ":") acceptableCiphers = AcceptableCiphers.fromOpenSSLCipherString(cipherListString) options = CertificateOptions(..., acceptableCiphers=acceptableCiphers) ...


2

If you're interested in something production worthy I would suggest using django with uWSGI/nginx. Here are the docs for getting started. After you're done hooking up uwsgi you can utilize nginx


2

The logging is interfering with the process's standard out. Try removing the line log.startLogging(sys.stdout) and you should find that raw_input() displays the prompt.


2

You didn't need to write that first file. Instead, twistd -n web --wsgi oms.wsgi.application


2

According to this source for the subprocess module (link) if you call communicate you should not need to close the stdout and stderr pipes. Otherwise I would try: process.stdout.close() process.stderr.close() after you are done using the process object. For instance, when you call .read() directly: output = process.stdout.read() process.stdout.close() ...


2

The "process name" feature you're using works by re-executing the process with a new argv[0]. There is no completely reliable way to save an arbitrary object (like the Application) across this process re-execution. This means that the .py file has to be re-evaluated in the new process to recreate the Application object so twistd knows what you want it to ...


1

Twisted Web lets you interpret HTTP request bodies (regardless of content-type, HTML or otherwise) incrementally as they're received - but it doesn't make doing so very easy. There's a very old ticket that we never seem to make much progress on for improving this situation. Until it's resolved, there probably isn't a better answer than the one I'm about to ...


1

Check this out (take from the github page for twisted): https://github.com/twisted/twisted/blob/trunk/twisted/internet/protocol.py Protocol is a subclass of BaseProtocol, which is also defined in the same .py file. class Protocol(BaseProtocol): """ This is the base class for streaming connection-oriented protocols. If you are going to write a new ...


1

As you say, a second call to Deferred.callback will raise an AlreadyCalledError. It is idiomatic to write code that doesn't trigger this exception, though. Most Deferred-using code I've written or read tries to reserve AlreadyCalledError to indicate programming errors rather than normal runtime conditions that can safely be ignored. So: def ...


1

Here is a working example. In the case of piping through cat | wc, spawnProcess duplicates the pipes so you need to close them. from twisted.internet import protocol from twisted.internet import reactor import os class Writer(protocol.ProcessProtocol): def __init__(self, data): self.data = data def connectionMade(self): print "Writer -- ...


1

If you want this error to be caught, you can do: from OpenSSL import SSL # ... try: # ... except SSL.Error: # ... Perhaps the syntax changes a bit. I can't check because I don't use this precise package, but the idea is that you have to declare the import path of the exceptions you want to catch.


1

Yes, it absolutely can. From a Twisted perspective, there is a support for pretty much everything you ask for - SFTP, FTPS, HTTPS and scheduling. When it comes to database integration, I would use standard Python db libraries. I don't think you need anything special from Twisted for that. Scheduled tasks could be accomplished through either Python ...


1

FWIW, options (2) and (3) each worked for me when I tried them independently of each other. For (2), I ran: pip install --user 'Twisted==13.1.0' (2) certainly seems more robust than (1) and (3), so I'd go with that if you can. I'd previously followed advice I found elsewhere on the web to downgrade to Twisted<12.0, but that only worked in tandem with ...


1

3) Previously, I tried using multiprocessing in my server program but it seemed not to work in combination with the Twisted reactor, while deferToThread did the job. I'm wondering how are Twisted threads implemented? Don't they utilize multiprocessing? Thanks in advance. You didn't say whether you used the multi-threaded version of multiprocessing or ...


1

I'd recommend to use Nginx + UWSGi in your production environment. It's one of the best performance firendly combination that is easy to setup and manage. That's what they use at Disqus. Now try to imagine how much request they get each day... It must be pretty stable.


1

If you're using ConnectionPool class then you can create a subclass of it and override its _runQuery method: from twisted.enterprise import adbapi class MyConnectionPool(adbapi.ConnectionPool) def _runQuery(self, trans, *args, **kw): trans.execute(*args, **kw) data = trans.fetchall() if trans.description is not None: ...


1

The type of the argument accepted by fromFile is not bytes but that is the type being passed in this code. It looks like you meant to pass a FilePath instance (FilePath is being imported) but you forgot and passed bytes instead.


1

File descriptors on Windows are a trick. I don't know whether there's some way to get a file descriptor for a TUN device on Windows but even if you manage to get one somehow, it won't work with Twisted. On Windows, Twisted is limited to interacting with file descriptors that represent sockets. This has to do with the way the Windows APIs that accept file ...


1

If you want to use twisted.web.client.Agent, you can’t without monkeypatching or something. Tracing through the source, one of the things you’ll find is: # In the future, having the protocol version be a parameter to this # method would probably be good. It would be nice if this method # weren't limited to issueing HTTP/1.1 requests. requestLines = [] ...



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