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2

The problem is that the method does not return a MyEnum, it returns some class which extends both Enum and MyInterface. Even if MyEnum satisfies those contraints, there might be other enums which also implement MyInterface, and those are not necessarily assigment compatible with MyEnum. Consider the following program: interface MyInterface {} enum MyEnum ...


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@Benjamin Hodgson has answered the main part of your question the same way I would have, so I'll not waste space repeating him. This is only a response to your edit. You want to instantiate either a DiskMemoryBlock<T> or a RamMemoryBlock<T> based on some conditions that come from the Buffer<T> constructor parameters: public class ...


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As long as you intend a DiskMemoryBlock to contain only value types, you can constrain it directly: class DiskMemoryBlock<T> : IMemoryBlock<T> where T : struct This is a common pattern in generic programming: you define general interfaces with unconstrained type parameters, which get more refined with subclasses tacking on constrains as you ...


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A possible trick is to hook in to the generativity that already exists in the type system. The following function is ill-typed: f :: a -> b -> a f x y = x `asTypeOf` y Even though b might actually be the same as a in some instantiation, since it also may not, a and b are treated as different types. Particularly for higher rank types, the way this ...


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All type parameters must be explicit, so you need to include 'State, 'Event, and 'Failure: type Instance<'Aggregate,'State,'Event,'Failure when 'Aggregate :> Aggregate.T<'State,'Event,'Failure>> = { ... Aggregate: 'Aggregate CurrentState: 'State ... } However, when using this type you should rarely need to explicitly specify those ...


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Ran into this problem as well. I had to add IdentityRole key type also, because it was still throwing the same error. services.AddIdentity<ApplicationUser, IdentityRole<int>>() .AddEntityFrameworkStores<ApplicationDbContext,int>() .AddDefaultTokenProviders();


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In override method, following works. public override TUserData GetCurrentUser<TUserData>() { return default(TUserData); } If the compiler allows you to write following code (UserDataA is a subclass of UserData) public override TUserData GetCurrentUser<TUserData>() { return new UserDataA(); } Then the consumer of this class ...


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where TUserData : UserData means that TUserData can be UserData or any class that inherits from UserData. You are returning new UserData() which might not always be possible to cast to TUserData. For example, consider this class that inherits from UserData: public class UserData2 : UserData { } What happens when you call ...


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You are essentially trying to downcast from UserData to whatever type TUserData will be, which is not allowed. Since you can't overload a method just by changing the return type you can't overload the method. You would have to use a new non-generic method and/or create a conversion method that can convert a UserData to a TUserData.


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You have to use the name you used in the inheriting class. You didn't specify the class, so let me give a couple of examples. If your inheriting class looked like this: public class ABC<T> extends DEF<T> { Then your override function has to use the same T public override TGetCurrentUser<T>() where T: UserData{ If you specified a type, ...



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