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23

In a word, general recursion. Haskell allows for arbitrary recursion while System F has no form of recursion. The lack of infinite types means fix isn't expressible as a closed term. There is no primitive notion of names and recursion. In fact, pure System F has no notion of any such thing as definitions! So in Haskell this single definition is what adds ...


16

Does Haskell's type system really deserve description "static"? I mean automatic type inference is not (classic) static typing. Type inference is done at compile time. All types are checked at compile time. Haskell implementations may erase types at runtime, as they have a compile-time proof of type safety. So it is correct to say that Haskell has a ...


10

I have difficulty structuring my answer in a nice way, but here is nevertheless an attempt at explaining what's going on: You get a compilation error because the extends clause requires class and traits, not types, and you're giving a type. Classes and traits must not be confused with types. There are certainly better explanations of this out there. But ...


10

Is C# type system sound and decidable? It depends on what restrictions you put on the type system. Some of the C# type system's designers have a paper on the subject that you will likely find interesting: http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/akenn/generics/fool2007.pdf In practice, the C# 4.0 and 5.0 compilers do not implement the infinitary ...


8

The static-dynamic axis and the manual-inferred (or manifest-inferred) scales are not orthogonal. A static type system can be manifest or inferred, the distinction doesn't apply to dynamic typing. Python, Perl, PHP don't infer types because type inference is the deduction of static types via static analysis (i.e., at compile time). Dynamic languages don't ...


8

You are looking for Dependent types. Idris, Agda and Coq are well known in this category.


7

Scala's type system can do pretty much everything Java's can (with some warts removed, like covariant arrays). In addition, it has the following features: Variance annotations An abstract class C that is generic on T can be made a subtype of C[U] where U is a subtype or a supertype of T. class C[+T] // C[T] <: C[U] iff T <: U class D[-T] // C[T] ...


7

The first argument of <*> is supposed to be f (a -> b). So given (<*>) (pure x), this is well-typed provided that x is some kind of function. The type of 2 is Num a => a. In other words, 2 can be any possible type, so long as it's an instance of Num. So in your expression (<*>) (pure 2), this is well-typed provided that the type of ...


7

It is strange, but in this context - is a acceptable identifier for a type parameter. Here is a longer example: class Y { def identity[-](x: -): - = x } (new Y).identity(5) // returns 5 The - inside [-] here is a normal type name, just like the - as the class name in the following code: class - Note that because the type parameters of methods cannot ...


6

That would be unsound with Jazz <: Music, Classical <: Music, but no relation between Jazz and Classical, meow[K <: T] means that a Cat[Music] can meow in Jazz, Classical, or any choice of genre. On the other hand, a Cat[Classical] meow cannot be Jazz. But if you have covariant Cat[+T], then a Cat[Classical] <: Cat[Music] , so a ...


6

There is no difference between them. But sometimes authors of libraries use parens to denote, that the computation is actually staged, so that it is better to apply it partially, so that you can get a more efficient function, rather then applying it every time. But from the type system perspective this functions are exactly the same, since -> type ...


6

You can't do that with a plain list, but you could construct your own list-like type as follows: {-# LANGUAGE GADTs #-} data CascadingList i o where Id :: CascadingList i i Cascade :: (b -> o) -> CascadingList i b -> CascadingList i o Then you could make these CascadingLists as follows: addOnePositive :: CascadingList Int Bool ...


5

Using DataKinds, you can expose the interior types of the collection, which may make using the constituent parts easier: {-# LANGUAGE PolyKinds #-} {-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies #-} {-# LANGUAGE KindSignatures #-} {-# LANGUAGE TypeOperators #-} {-# LANGUAGE DataKinds #-} {-# LANGUAGE GADTs #-} module Cascade where import Control.Monad ((>=>), liftM) ...


5

List all record fields This one is very much possible, and it's indeed done by recursing on the structure of Rep, using a class. The solution below works for single-constructor types and returns empty string names for fields without selectors: {-# LANGUAGE DeriveGeneric #-} {-# LANGUAGE PolyKinds #-} {-# LANGUAGE TypeOperators #-} {-# LANGUAGE ...


5

It's not particularly hard to create problems that the C# complier cannot solve in a reasonable amount of time. Some of the problems it is posed with (often related to generics/type inference) are NP-hard problems. Eric Lippert describes one such example here: class MainClass { class T{} class F{} delegate void DT(T t); delegate void DF(F ...


5

Constructor patterns must conform to the expected type of the pattern, which means B <: A[U], a claim which is true if U is a type parameter of the method presently being called (because it can be instantiated to the appropriate type argument) but untrue if U is a previously bound class type parameter. You can certainly question the value of the "must ...


5

About variance from the book Functional Programming in Scala: In the declaration trait List[+A], the + in front of the type parameter A is a variance annotation which signals that A is a covariant or “positive” parameter of List. This means that, for instance, List[Dog] is considered a subtype of List[Animal] , assuming Dog is a ...


5

I assume you mean pattern matching for values in general. The special case of string pattern matching (regular expressions) is supported via library functions in pretty much any language. Pattern matching and type checking policy are independent language "features". Pattern matching is the process in which values are matched against patterns and successful ...


5

The Java Language Specification states Given a generic type declaration C<F1,...,Fn> (n > 0), the direct supertypes of the parameterized type C<T1,...,Tn>, where Ti (1 ≤ i ≤ n) is a type, are all of the following: [...] C<S1,...,Sn>, where Sicontains Ti (1 ≤ i ≤ n) (§4.5.1). and about containing described above A ...


4

Looks like it is a compiler caveat. From this, martin odersky puts it as: In the method case, what you have here is a GADT: Patterns determine the type parameters of an corresponding methods in the scope of a pattern case. GADTs are not available for class parameters. As far as I know, nobody has yet explored this combination, and it looks like ...


4

When you trying doing it in repl, it says: scala> trait Hello[+A] { | def test[B<:A](x: B) | } <console>:8: error: covariant type A occurs in contravariant position in type <: A of type B def test[B<:A](x: B) ^ Rightly so. Imagine if this was possible and you could: val x:Hello[Dog] = new ...


4

So, let's start with a motivating example. Suppose I write the following: class Foo[+A] { def foo(a : A) = ??? } Now, by annotating the type parameter A with a +, I've declared that Foo is covariant in A, which is to say that if X <: Y, then Foo[X] <: Foo[Y]. So, suppose I have such a Foo[X] and I try to pass it to a function which requires a ...


4

In MATLAB, a string is just a vector of ASCII characters. You can see more on ascii on wikipedia. When you mix characters and doubles MATLAB will convert the character to its equivalent ASCII number and return the result. So '1' becomes 49 and 49 + 1 = 50. When you write '123' + 1 this becomes [49 50 51] + 1 and MATLAB correctly computes the result as [50 ...


4

In the case of 3 and five, it is a different type; it is the IMyInterface<SpecificT> where SpecificT is the generic type parameter (not the actual known value, but the parameter itself) from MyClass<T> - i.e. it is dependent. This is different to the completely free (independent) T in IMyInterface<T>, which is what 1, 2 and 4 provide. If ...


3

I'll give a simpler example where it's reasonably clear. Admittedly I myself don't really see how this would translate to something like Set, efficiently. data Nat = Nat (Integer / abs) To use this safely, we must be sure that any function Nat -> T (with some non-quotient T, for simplicity's sake) does not depend on the actual integer value, but only ...


3

The commenter hit it right on the head: The ASCII code for '1' is 49. You can see the same behavior in C: printf("%d", '1' + 1); and you'll get 50. You can see the type of variable using the class() function: octave:1> a = '1' a = 1 octave:2> b = 1 b = 1 octave:3> class(a) ans = char octave:4> class(b) ans = double octave:5> c = [1 2 3] ...


3

As I already noted in a comment, type variance can only be talked of in relation to a type parameter. A type itself isn't covariant or contravariant or invariant. Since K does not appear in the type parameter list of Cat, Cat has no variance in relation to K. Consider: trait Cat[T] { def meow[K] } class SiameseCat[T] extends Cat[T] { def meow[K] = ...


3

The language reference says: The variance position of a method parameter is the opposite of the variance position of the enclosing parameter clause. The variance position of a type parameter is the opposite of the variance position of the enclosing type parameter clause. The variance position of the lower bound of a type declaration or type parameter is ...


3

The difference has to do with what information the compiler and runtime have in each case, combined with what the restrictions on the types are. Below the ambiguity is clarified by having U be the trait and class parameter, and X be the method type paramter. sealed trait A[U] case class B(u: Unit) extends A[Unit] class Test[U]() { def test(t: A[U]) = t ...


3

After reading a lot on this topic, I seem to have found an answer in this paper of Altidor, Reichenbach, and Smaragdakis. The main addition that Java generics have in contrast to use-site variance is capture conversion which allows capturing the previously unknown type of a wildcard in a type parameter. This example from the paper explains it best: One ...



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