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123

What happens if somebody passes a unicode string to your function? Or a class derived from dict? Or a class implementing a dict-like interface? Following code covers first two cases. If you are using Python 2.6 you might want to use collections.Mapping instead of dict as per the ABC PEP. def value_list(x): if isinstance(x, dict): return ...


78

Simplest way I can think of: # checking whether foo is a boolean !!foo == foo


73

I think you are looking for instance_of?. is_a? and kind_of? will return true for instances from derived classes. class X < String end foo = X.new foo.is_a? String # true foo.kind_of? String # true foo.instance_of? String # false foo.instance_of? X # true


62

I upvoted Matt Joiner's answer, but wanted to include some additional observations to make it clear that, along with a couple of other factors, there are 4 times that matter when choosing between pre-checking conditions (known as LBYL or "Look Before You Leap") and just handling exceptions (known as EAFP or "Easier to Ask Forgiveness than Permission"). ...


56

Use isinstance(). Sample: if isinstance(n, unicode): #do this else if isinstance(n, Node): #do that


51

There is no Boolean class in Ruby, the only way to check is to do what you're doing (comparing the object against true and false or the class of the object against TrueClass and FalseClass). Can't think of why you would need this functionality though, can you explain? :) If you really need this functionality however, you can hack it in: module Boolean; end ...


46

Use instanceof (myvar instanceof Date) // returns true or false


42

The error message says it all. At runtime, the type is gone, there is no way to check for it. You could catch it by making a factory for your object like this: public static <T> MyObject<T> createMyObject(Class<T> type) { return new MyObject<T>(type); } And then in the object's constructor store that type, so variable so ...


35

There's a classic, somewhat alarming example (involving interaction with functional dependencies) in this paper from HQ: class Mul a b c | a b -> c where mul :: a -> b -> c instance Mul a b c => Mul a [b] [c] where mul a = map (mul a) f b x y = if b then mul x [y] else y We need mul x [y] to have the same type as y, so, taking x :: x and ...


30

Here's a sketch of an algorithm. It's also the basis of Lennart Augustsson's celebrated technique for compiling pattern matching efficiently. (The paper is in that incredible FPCA proceedings (LNCS 201) with oh so many hits.) The idea is to reconstruct an exhaustive, non-redundant analysis by repeatedly splitting the most general pattern into constructor ...


28

Yes: if (typeof(T) == typeof(MyClass)) { MyClass mc = (MyClass)(object) t; } else if (typeof(T) == typeof(List<MyClass>)) { List<MyClass> lmc = (List<MyClass>)(object) t; } It's slightly odd that you need to go via a cast to object, but that's just the way that generics work - there aren't as many conversions from a generic type ...


26

There are two ways that you can do this. First, you can use the typeid operator, which returns a type_info structure containing the type of the object. For example: Base* ptr = /* ... */ if (typeid(*ptr) == typeid(DerivedType) { /* ... ptr points to a DerivedType ... */ } Notice that you have to use typeid(*ptr) and not typeid(ptr) here. If you use ...


24

Pattern matching would make it much more nicer. def getInteger(obj: Any) = obj match { case n: Number => n.longValue case b: Boolean => if(b) 1 else 0 case s: String if s.length != 0 && s != "null" => s.toLong case _ => null }


23

Theoretical part This is an architectural peculiarity of scalac that started leaking into the public API once we exposed internal compiler data structures in compile-time / runtime reflection in 2.10. Very roughly speaking, scalac's frontend consists of a parser and a typer, both of which work with trees and produce trees as their result. However ...


21

(Thanks to @CommonsWare for the heads up). There are Java annotations to support these checks in your own code. They can all be found in the android.support.annotations package: IdRes DrawableRes LayoutRes StringRes &c In this case, for example, I could use: private void mySetContentView(@LayoutRes int resourceId) { setContentView(resourceId); ...


19

Currently, exhaustiveness and redundancy checking are only done for case class constructor patterns. In principle, the compiler could do this for some other kinds of patterns, too. But it would have to be specified in the SLS exactly what tests are done. This looks doable but non-trivial, given the interactions between different pattern classes. So, in ...


18

row["PersonID"] is of type object, which means that != and == will use reference identity. Basically you're comparing boxed values. If you use: if (!object.Equals(row["PersonID"], tbxPersonID.EditValue)) then you'll get value equality semantics, and I suspect you'll be okay - assuming that tbxPersonID really is an int, either boxed or not. Just to make ...


18

As an alternative to writing it yourself, you can use BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF macro available in boost/strong_typedef.hpp header. // macro used to implement a strong typedef. strong typedef // guarentees that two types are distinguised even though the // share the same underlying implementation. typedef does not create // a new type. BOOST_STRONG_TYPEDEF(T, ...


18

If you look at the type ghc has deduced for it you can see perfects :: forall a. (Eq a, Integral [a]) => [a] -> [[a]] So if you have an instance that makes lists be in class Integral it works. And ghc doesn't know that's not what you intend. You'll get an error if you put the intended type signature on perfects, or of you use perfects in the way ...


18

You'll need the extension ScopedTypeVariables. You also need to add an explicit forall a b c . to your signature, which signals to bind the variables for the whole scope of the definition. {-# LANGUAGE ScopedTypeVariables #-} f :: forall a b c . (a -> b) -> a -> c -> b f g = let inner :: a -> c -> b inner x y = g x in inner


17

*sigh* No, typechecking arguments in Python is not necessary. It is never necessary. If your code accepts addresses as rawstring or as a Node object, your design is broken. That comes from the fact that if you don't know already the type of an object in your own program, then you're doing something wrong already. Typechecking hurts code reuse and ...


17

Your taste may vary, but the Pythonic(tm) style is to just go ahead and use objects as you need to. If they don't support the operations you're attempting, an exception will be raised. This is known as duck typing. There are a few reasons for favoring this style: first, it enables polymorphism by allowing you to use new kinds of objects with existing code ...


17

As stated above there is no boolean class just TrueClass and FalseClass however you can use any object as the subject of if/unless and everything is true except instances of FalseClass and nil Boolean tests return an instance of the FalseClass or TrueClass (1 > 0).class #TrueClass The following monkeypatch to Object will tell you whether something is ...


17

For example: {-# LANGUAGE UndecidableInstances #-} class C a where f :: a -> a instance C [[a]] => C [a] where f = id g x = x + f [x] What is happening: When typing f [x] the compiler needs to ensure that x :: C [a] for some a. The instance declaration says that x can be of type C [a] only if it is also of type C [[a]]. So the compiler ...


16

if (objectReference instanceof type) More info here: http://www.java2s.com/Tutorial/Java/0060__Operators/TheinstanceofKeyword.htm


16

Object.prototype.toString.call(obj) === "[object Date]" will work in every case, and obj instanceof Date will only work in date objects from the same view instance (window).


15

C++ language is statically typed. The decisions about the legality of your call are made at compile time. The compiler, obviously, cannot know that s1->duplicate() returns a pointer to a Box object. Under these circumstances, it would be illogical to expect it to accept your code. Yes, s1->duplicate() indeed calls Box::duplicate in your example, but ...


15

I think this is one of those cases where the C# definition of is differs from the CLI's definition of isinst, which evidently treats enums as their underlying base type when checking for array assignment compatibility. (Eric Lippert wrote a blog post that explains why uint[] is treated as an int[] by the CLI but not by C#; I suspect the same explanation ...


14

You could do something like: typedef struct { unsigned int c_idx; } char_idx; typedef struct { unsigned int b_idx; } byte_idx; Then you would see when you are using each: char_idx a; byte_idx b; b.b_idx = a.c_idx; Now it is more clear that they are different types but would still compile.



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