Hot answers tagged

75

You can use the initWithData: initializer: [[NSString alloc] initWithData:data encoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding]; Change the encoding to that of the source data.


38

char unicodeChar = (char)event.getUnicodeChar();


36

Copy the base64 encoded part and convert it. There are many ways to do that. Linux base64 -d base64_encoded_font.txt > font.woff Mac OS X openssl base64 -d -in base64_encoded_font.txt -out font.woff WIndows Go to http://www.motobit.com/util/base64-decoder-encoder.asp and paste the text. Choose "decode the data from a Base64 string (base64 decoding)...


34

Tweaks: TypeDescriptionProvider still replaces metadata (not extends) can also be added be TypeDescriptor.AddProvider can be applied per-type as well as per-instance, making it possible to apply to lists without having to implement ITypedList TypeConverter for PropertyGrid, this is also the mechanism used to obtain metadata; note that ...


31

You need to provide an implicit conversion operator from int to Unit, like so: public struct Unit { // the conversion operator... public static implicit operator Unit(int value) { return new Unit(value); } // the boring stuff... private readonly int value; public int Value { get { return ...


24

I solved this by creating an single Converter that could hanlde all of the types derrived from my generic class. The big issue of knowing the generic arg T within the ConvertFrom was solved by capturing the information in the constructor as seen below. public MyGenericConverter(Type type) { if (type.IsGenericType && type....


19

Everyone here who has mentioned that declaring an Int16 saves ram should get a downvote. The answer to your question is to use the keyword "int" (or if you feel like it, use "Int32"). That gives you a range of up to 2.4 billion numbers... Also, 32bit processors will handle those ints better... also (and THE MOST IMPORTANT REASON) is that if you plan on ...


16

You could use the packBits function (in the base package). Bear in mind that this function requires very specific input. (yy <- intToBits(5)) # [1] 01 00 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 # [26] 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 # Note that there are 32 bits and the order is reversed from your example class(yy) [1] "raw" packBits(...


16

That line would work only with an implicit static conversion operator (or maybe the more-confusing true() operator, but that is rarely seen in the wild). You cannot define operators on enums, so ultimately the answer is: no. You could, however, write an extension method on MyEnum to return true or false. static class MyEnumUtils { public static bool ...


14

Here is what you can try: binStr <- "00000001001100110000010110110111" # 20121015 (binNum <- 00000001001100110000010110110111) # 20121015 [1] 1.0011e+24 binVec <- c(1,0,1,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,1) # 2670721 shortBin <- 10011010010 # 1234 BinToDec <- function(x) sum(2^(which(rev(unlist(strsplit(as.character(x), "")) == 1))-1))...


14

Yes, these two very different things. The first line: P = (Point)V; // Works uses the explicit conversion operator, which is overloaded for this combination. The second, however: P = (Point)(V as object); // Specified cast is not valid. this casts the reference V as an object (which we trivially know it is) - and then separately casts from object to ...


14

Hmm, not sure I've seen this before, but you could add the TypeConverterAttribute at runtime using a TypeDescriptor, so given my sample classes: public class MyType { public string Name; } public class MyTypeConverter : TypeConverter { public override bool CanConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, Type sourceType) { if (sourceType =...


12

Easy. import std.conv; import std.stdio; void main() { float x = to!float("234.32"); double y = to!double("234.32"); writefln("And the float is: %f\nHey, we also got a double: %f", x, y); } std.conv is the swiss army knife of conversion in D. It's really impressive!


12

a = 0.000006; b = 6; c = a/b; textbox.Text = c.ToString("0.000000"); As you requested: textbox.Text = c.ToString("0.######"); This will only display out to the 6th decimal place if there are 6 decimals to display.


11

I think the latter TypeDescriptor.GetConverter(typeof(GradientColor)) because it allows other converters to add or extend the type converter system when the code is run in a different context (like custom control run in another application with its own custom typeconverters).


11

I had the same problem: defined in the resources section <UserControl.Resources> <local:MyConverter x:Key="myConverter"/> </UserControl.Resources> In the XAML UE, I had to change ...Width="{Binding BindingProperty, Converter=myConverter}"... to ...Width="{Binding BindingProperty, Converter={StaticResource myConverter}..."


11

Write an extension method like this: public static bool ToBoolean(this MyEnum value) { return value == MyEnum.MyTrue; } and forget about it


11

As long as you are not very particular about what exactly kind of value you end up with, "number" + 0 is probably the best way of converting your input because it converts to the "natural" numeric data type. The result will be an integer if the input has no decimal part and fits (see PHP_INT_MAX) or a float if it does not.


10

After hooking a debugger into Cassini, I see that the null ref is actually coming from System.Web.Compilation.CodeDomUtility.GenerateExpressionForValue, which is basically trying to get an expression for the int[] array you pass into the List constructor. Since there's no type descriptor for the int[] array, it fails (and throws a null ref in the process, ...


10

Got it! Set the Binding.FormattingEnabled property to true. This seems to make it all work. You can do this with an overload to the ControlBindingsCollection.Add method which takes a Boolean parameter at the end. It's odd that it worked one way but not the other before, but certainly my test app now works... (Old answer below) I wouldn't be at all ...


9

You get a wrong number because when you prepend zero to an integer literal, Java interprets the number as an octal (i.e. base-8) constant. If you want to add a leading zero, use int test = 12345; System.out.println("0"+test); You can also use the formated output functionality with the %06d specifier, like this: System.out.format("%06d", num); 6 means "...


9

You need to allocate the converter. On a property-by-property basis, you can use: [TypeConverter(typeof(DateTimeConverterEx))] public DateTime Foo {get {...} set {...}} This would then work for usage of the form: var prop = TypeDescriptor.GetProperties(obj)["Foo"]; var converter = prop.Converter; // as before, using "converter" This will work for most ...


8

You're expecting Convert.ChangeType to use a TypeConverter if one is present - it doesn't. TypeConverter is usually used in conjunction with TypeDescriptor (often implicitly in UI frameworks).


8

You're using a specific implementation of the List interface as a return type for the reverse function (namely ArrayList). This forces what you return to be an ArrayList, but you're defining it as List. To understand, try and change the construction part to use a LinkedList, which also implements List: List<Integer> newList = new LinkedList<...


8

Just wanted to add that... I remembered that in the days of .NET 1.1 the compiler was optimized so that 'int' operations are actually faster than byte or short operations. I believe it still holds today, but I'm running some tests now. EDIT: I have got a surprise discovery: the add, subtract and multiply operations for short(s) actually return int!


8

To convert from most any type to most any other type, use std.conv.to. e.g. auto d = to!double("234.32"); or auto str = to!string(234.32); On the other hand, if you're looking to parse several whitespace-separated values from a string (removing the values from the string as you go), then use std.conv.parse. e.g. auto str = "123 456.7 false"; auto i = ...


7

Use bindec() function to convert from binary to decimal: $value = bindec("10101011010101");


7

If you know you're getting a string, you can use TypeConverter.ConvertFromString instead. That works with DateTimeConverter, although I don't know why ConvertTo doesn't. For instance, this works: TypeConverter c = TypeDescriptor.GetConverter( typeof (DateTime) ); Console.WriteLine((DateTime) c.ConvertFromString("09/09/2009")); Alternatively, just ...


7

You can convert your JsonArray or json string to ArrayList<OBJECT> using Gson library as below ArrayList<OBJECT> yourArray = new Gson().fromJson(jsonString, new TypeToken<List<OBJECT>>(){}.getType()); //or ArrayList<OBJECT> yourArray = new Gson().fromJson(myjsonarray.toString(), new TypeToken<List<OBJECT>>(){}....



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