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34

Short answer: portability. While __arglist, __makeref, and __refvalue are language extensions and are undocumented in the C# Language Specification, the constructs used to implement them under the hood (vararg calling convention, TypedReference type, arglist, refanytype, mkanyref, and refanyval instructions) are perfectly documented in the CLI Specification ...


12

Well, I'm no Eric Lippert, so I can't speak directly of Microsoft's motivations, but if I were to venture a guess, I'd say that TypedReference et al. aren't well documented because, frankly, you don't need them. Every use you mentioned for these features can be accomplished without them, albeit at a performance penalty in some cases. But C# (and .NET in ...


11

Are there any practical uses of the TypedReference struct that you would actually use in real code? Yes. I'd use them if I needed interoperability with C-style variadic methods. Why do these overloads exist? The exist for interoperability with callers who like to use C-style variadic methods.


9

Frankly, there's no need whatsoever for TypedReference here - just a boxed struct should work fine: var amountField = obj.GetType().GetField("Amount"); object money = amountField.GetValue(obj); var codeField = money.GetType().GetField("Code"); codeField.SetValue(money, "XXX"); amountField.SetValue(obj, money); However! I will advise ...


3

The problem is out -- the compiler doesn't know how to compile out __refvalue properly (or ref __refvalue, for that matter), which is not surprising, since the feature __refvalue supports (varargs) doesn't need to combine with out. This is a bug in the sense that the compiler isn't supposed to emit invalid code; this is not a bug in the sense that if you use ...


2

This appears to be a very old question, but I'd like to add one more use-case: when you have a struct and want to set its variable through reflection, you would always operate on the boxed value and never change the original. This is useless: TestFields fields = new TestFields { MaxValue = 1234 }; FieldInfo info = typeof(TestFields).GetField("MaxValue"); ...


2

Yes! You can trick the compiler into creating a field of type TypedReference, by creating an iterator or lambda that uses one (or maybe an async block): static IEnumerable<object> Sneaky(TypedReference t1) { yield return TypedReference.ToObject(t1); } static Func<object> Lambda(TypedReference t1) { return () => ...


1

What are you trying to do exactly? Locals are on stack and arguments are too depending on the calling convention. Storing or returning the address of a local or argument is not good because it will get overriden. There is no way to prevent them from being overriden besides like not calling methods. If you turn on unmanaged debugging you can use the ...


1

TypedReference seems pretty conclusively locked down. I guess it was simpler to just lock the type down to keep it safe, rather than allow it to be passed about but only in an unsafe context. You can hold on to one for while... will cost you a thread though :) namespace TehHorror { using System; using System.Threading; class Horror { ...


1

The documentation you link to has an option at the top to switch to the documentation for older versions of .NET Framework, including 1.1, which reads: Return Value This method assigns value to target. A change type of value converts it to the type of the TypedReference. The Convert.ChangeType method does the conversion. This should answer your ...



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