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11

Ideally, the author of the function would have liked to use sub fact { my ($n) = @_; my $_fact; $_fact = sub { my ($n, $prod) = @_; return $prod if $n == 0; return $_fact->($n-1, $n*$prod); }; return $_fact->($n, 1); } Unfortunately, that has a memory leak. The anon sub has a reference to $_fact, which holds a ...


10

1) "*PIPER" is a typeglob. It is "$PIPER", "@PIPER", and "%PIPER" (and I then some) all in one. They are declaring all *PIPER names local to the code snippet you have. 2) That's a shell command. It ends with a | which means that that command is being run, and it's output is being piped in as the input for the filehandle PIPER. The program then reads this ...


10

You can define all the symbols you want during runtime, but prototypes will only affect code compiled afterwards since prototypes affect how calls to the sub are parsed and compiled. For example: use strict; use warnings; package Foo; BEGIN { *Foo::bar = sub () { 42 }; } *Foo::baz = sub () { 43 }; my $bar = bar; my $baz = baz; print "bar = [$bar], ...


9

Maybe not the kind of difference you were looking for, but there are two big differences between *main::foo and $main::{foo}; the former looks up the glob in the stash at compile time, creating it if necessary, while the latter looks for the glob in the stash at run time, and won't create it. This may make a difference to anything else poking about in the ...


8

Use the *foo{THING} syntax, which is documented in the Making References section of the perlref documentation. A reference can be created by using a special syntax, lovingly known as the *foo{THING} syntax. *foo{THING} returns a reference to the THING slot in *foo (which is the symbol table entry which holds everything known as foo). $scalarref = ...


8

t( F ): A string[1] isn't a reference to a glob. t( \F ): A reference to a string isn't a reference to a glob. t( *F ): A glob isn't a reference to a glob. t( \*F ): A reference to a glob is a reference to a glob. «A word that has no other interpretation in the grammar will be treated as if it were a quoted string. These are known as ...


7

Manipulating symbol table references yourself is bound to get you into trouble, as there are lots of little fiddly things that are hard to get right. Fortunately there is a module that does all the heavy lifting for you, Package::Stash -- so just call its methods add_package_symbol and remove_package_symbol as needed. Another good method installer that you ...


7

As others have mentioned the cookbook is using the term "proper" to refer to the fact that a subroutine is created that carries with it a variable that is from a higher lexical scope and that this variable can no longer be reached by any other means. I use the over simplified mnemonic "Access to the $color variable is 'closed'" to remember this part of ...


6

I believe that "proper closure" just means actually a closure. If $name is not a lexical, all the subs will refer to the same variable (whose value will have been reset to whatever value it had before the for loop, if any). *$name is using the value of $name as the reference for the funny kind of dereferencing a * sigil does. Since $name is a string, it ...


6

If you're asking how you get a reference to a type glob, it's just: my $ref = \*symbol_name_here; For a "literal name" of they symbol, (that is where you type in the exact name of the symbol), and not a variable. But, you can do this: my $ref = Symbol::qualify_to_ref( $symbol_name ); for a variable symbol. However the above works with strict and the ...


6

In the fully general case, you can't do what you want thanks to the following excerpt from perlref: *foo{THING} returns undef if that particular THING hasn't been used yet, except in the case of scalars. *foo{SCALAR} returns a reference to an anonymous scalar if $foo hasn't been used yet. This might change in a future release. But if you're willing to ...


6

As others have noted, *PIPER is a typeglob so you can dynamically scope the PIPER filehandle. That's ancient Perl though. Use a lexical filehandle instead: sub foo { my $http_query = "..."; open my($piper), $http_query or die "sorry"; while() { $rets = $_; } return $rets; } You don't need to do any of this ...


4

You can also do this without using an external module, as discussed in perldoc perlmod under "Symbol Tables": package Mypackage; use strict; use warnings; our @myarray = qw/a b/; package main; our @array; *array = \@Mypackage::myarray; print "array from Mypackage is @array\n"; However, whether this is a good idea depends on the context of your program. ...


4

The qualify_to_ref function returns a typeglob reference, which you can de-reference like this: my @array = @{*$ref}; The typeglob dereferencing syntax is documented here.


4

Without strict, identifiers without other meaning are interpreted as barewords, and barewords produce strings. That explains the first two lines (cf. print \"F" for the second one). The interpolation of globs (3rd line) is documented in perlref. *foo{NAME} and *foo{PACKAGE} are the exception, in that they return strings, rather than references. These ...


3

Accessing the stash as $A::{foo} = $obj allows you to place anything on the symbol table while *A::foo = $obj places $obj on the expected slot of the typeglob according to $obj type. For example: DB<1> $ST::{foo} = [1,2,3] DB<2> *ST::bar = [1,2,3] DB<3> x @ST::foo Cannot convert a reference to ARRAY to typeglob at (eval ...


3

The following script: #!/usr/bin/env perl #mytest.pl no warnings; $bar = "this"; @bar = qw/ 1 2 3 4 5 /; %bar = qw/ key value /; open bar, '<', 'mytest.pl' or die $!; sub bar { return "Sub defined as 'bar()'"; } $main::{foo} = $main::{bar}; print "The scalar \$foo holds $foo\n"; print "The array \@foo holds @foo\n"; print "The hash \%foo holds ...


3

local *PIPER; is declaring the PIPER file handle to be local. Since file handles don't have their own type symbol, they need to be caught by typeglobs in order to be declared local. curl is similar to wget; it is used to transfer a URL. See man curl for more details, but the -d switch (data) passes the following string as data in a POST operation, and the ...


3

Working code using a CPAN module that gets some of the hair out of the way, Package::Stash. As noted in my comment to gbacon's answer, this is blind to the config file doing $someval = undef but that seems to be unavoidable, and at least the other cases are caught. It also limits itself to the SCALAR, ARRAY, HASH, CODE, and IO types -- getting GLOB and ...


3

Beginning in 5.010, you can distinguish whether a SCALAR exists using the B introspection module; see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3335425/detecting-declared-package-variables-in-perl/3337046#3337046 Update: example copied from that answer: # package main; our $f; sub f {} sub g {} use B; use 5.010; if ( ${ B::svref_2object(\*f)->SV } ) { say ...


3

Figured it out myself. I have to use the CODE portion of the typeglob instead of assigning the whole typeglob to another typeglob. That way it seems to make a copy. *old_foo = *foo{CODE}; require 'foo_killer.pl'; *foo = *old_foo{CODE}; brian d foy also talks about this in Mastering Perl (on page 131f), but doesn't mention the copying part.


3

Try like this { local *foo; require 'foo_killer.pl'; }


3

Your first example kind of shows how Exporter works: by assigning typeglobs. But there is an important difference: when the functions are imported. This is mostly important when a subroutine has a prototype. Prototypes need to be known during parsing, and therefore have to be known in the BEGIN phase. use – which usually calls import on the used package – is ...


2

Update: The problem of distinguishing between a variable that might be assigned to the *DATA or *STDIN globs is a job for fileno: sub data_or_stdin { my $x = shift; if (fileno($x) == fileno(DATA)) { return "DATA"; } elsif (fileno($x) == fileno(STDIN)) { return "STDIN"; } else { return "NEITHER"; } } print "DATA: ", ...


2

I don’t have the module installed, so can’t check easily enough, but I presume that it’s because the object is a globref; that is, a reference to a blessed typeglob. There’s no aliasing going on here. When you write *$self->{ssl_debug} = $ssl_debug; It first derefs the globref back to a full typeglob. It then grabs just the hashref aspect of the ...


2

{package Foo; our $spud = 'a scalar'; our @spud = 'an array'; our %spud = (a => 'hash'); sub spud {} format spud = . open 'spud', $0; } my $stash = \%Foo::; my $name = 'spud'; my $glob = $$stash{$name}; for my $type (qw(SCALAR ARRAY HASH CODE IO FORMAT)) { print *$glob{$type}, $/; } prints: SCALAR(0x810070) ...


2

The reason it happens is precisely because you assigned a typeglob. When you delete the CODE symbol, the rest of typeglob is still lingering, so when you try to execute howdy it will point to the non-CODE piece of typeglob.


2

I would suggest wrapping the evil legacy code into a package once and for all. package Foo; use strict; use warnings; use Exporter; our @ISA = qw(Exporter); our @EXPORT_OK = qw(foo bar $evil $global $variables); do "foo_killer.pl" or die "Failed to load foo_killer.pl: ".($@ || $!); 1; Here I use do, because require does nothing if the code is ...


2

Check typeglob aliases Example above should be written using anonymous subroutine/closure: sub fact { my ($n) = @_; my $_fact; $_fact = sub { my ($n, $prod) = @_; return $prod if $n == 0; return __SUB__->($n-1, $n*$prod); }; return $_fact->($n, 1); }


1

From perlfaq7: What's a closure? Closures are documented in perlref. Closure is a computer science term with a precise but hard-to-explain meaning. Usually, closures are implemented in Perl as anonymous subroutines with lasting references to lexical variables outside their own scopes. These lexicals magically refer to the variables that ...



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