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19

size_type is guaranteed to be large enough for the largest supported vector size, vector::max_size(). int is not: on many common platforms, int has 32 bits, while max_size() is considerably larger than 231. If you know the size is (and will always be) a small number like 20, then you can get away with using int or any other integer type instead of ...


9

According to the Haskell report type synonyms cannot be partially applied: Type constructor symbols T introduced by type synonym declarations cannot be partially applied; it is a static error to use T without the full number of arguments. In particular this is checked before expanding the type synonyms, this means that in the expression: MyType ...


8

This is a special case of structural typing but called a 'type lambda', if you search for type lambda scala google will give you some results. In short, it's used in a similar fashion as partially applied functions. def x(a:Int, b:Int):Int = a * b val x10 = x(10, _:Int) x10(2) // 2 An example with types. type IntEither[B] = Either[Int, B] val ...


7

You can use nullary constructors (like True, False, Nothing, () etc) data F3 = Zero | One | Two deriving (Bounded, Enum, Show) To enumerate all valid values, we simply derive Enum and Bounded and let GHC do all the work for us. enum :: Enum a => [a] enum = [minBound .. maxBound] λ. enum :: [F3] [Zero,One,Two] If you want to use these like ...


7

I don't know if there is a built in way to do it but the following generic method would do the trick: void Main() { object x = "this is actually a string"; Console.WriteLine(GetCompileTimeType(x)); } public Type GetCompileTimeType<T>(T inputObject) { return typeof(T); } This method will return the type System.Object since generic types ...


6

From Effective Java by Bloch, Item 25: ...arrays and generics have very different type rules. Arrays are covariant and reified; generics are invariant and erased. As a consequence, arrays provide runtime type safety but not compile-time type safety and vice versa for generics. Generally speaking, arrays and generics don’t mix well. If you find ...


6

Option is a parameterized type and is defined as such: ... sealed abstract class Option[+A] ... it's being extended by 2 other classes: final case class Some[+A](x: A) extends Option[A] and case object None extends Option[Nothing] While Some can take any type of an argument, None is a special instance/singleton of an Option parameterized with ...


5

In your case, there is no explicit reason to use the vector<double>::size_type (although it would technically be better to use size_type) since the loop runs from 0 to 20 and both are int. Hence the following would be ok. for (int i = 0; i < 20; ++i) { // loops 20 times // ... } The embedded type vector<double>::size_type relates to the ...


5

I am surprised that nobody mentioned the existence of Option.empty: scala> Option.empty[String] res0: Option[String] = None Note that in many cases simply using None where an Option[String] is expected will work fine. Or in other words, (as shown by Aleksey Izmailov), the following is corrrect: def f(o: Option[String]) = ...; f(None) This is ...


5

If you want to specify the type of Option you could use: None:Option[String] The colon is an explicit type annotation.


4

This is actually just a syntactical accident (I think). Scala allows early definitions which look like class Some extends { ... } with ATrait so the parser also accepts class Some extends { ... } which is equivalent to class Some { ... } (source).


4

If your intention is to obtain the Type of each element in the sequence, call GetType on each element like this: var enumerator = sequence.GetEnumerator(); while (enumerator.MoveNext()) { Type currentType = enumerator.Current.GetType(); } However, if your intention is to branch according to the type of the element, I suggest that you use the is ...


3

This is actually a strange quirk in Scala's syntax. An extraneous extends is allowed before beginning the body of the class. Here are the relevant parts from the Scala Syntax Summary: ClassDef ::= id [TypeParamClause] {ConstrAnnotation} [AccessModifier] ClassParamClauses ClassTemplateOpt ClassTemplateOpt ::= ‘extends’ ...


3

You can't use integer literals in a new type like that. They are already taken, so it isn't valid syntax. cdk's answer gives a much more practical scenario, but I thought I would give an example of how something like your last example could be implemented in Haskell. If we turn on some of the more fun extensions, we can convince GHC to make a type with a ...


3

enum OrderStatus { InQueue, Handling, Shipping, Received } You may or may not need to mark it public depending on your needs You may or may not need to set specific integer values to each of the enum items. Once you start persisting them you never (well, would be easier not to) want to change the order. By assigning specific values can ...


3

std::function is a polymorphic container for callable objects that support a particular call signature†. The lambda in the example can be called the same way a void() function is called; ignoring return values was never a type error in C++ (whether that is a good or a bad idea is a different question). Therefore, std::function<void()> allows ...


3

The Function type is correct - Julia doesn't currently create a more specific type.


2

All calculator programs uses another data type to store large numbers. For example, they do not store as an int (1234), or float(0.1) instead, it is stored as an array [1, 2, 3, 4] or a strut defined for the number. There are several reasons. To be able to calculate very big numbers (Bigger than 64 bit, 128 bit) To be able to be precious. For example, 0.9 ...


2

The vector size_type is what's used by vector to do size comparisons. If you had a loop that used an int as a counter and compared against the vector's actual size, you'd get warnings from the compiler about signed vs. unsigned integer comparisons: for( int i=0; i<score.size(); i++ ){ // <-- signed vs. unsigned comparisons // do something... }


2

Do it like this: $width = ((Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_VideoController).CurrentHorizontalResolution)[0] $height = ((Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_VideoController).CurrentVerticalResolution)[0] $result = $width / $height echo $width echo $height echo $result IMHO (Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_VideoController).CurrentHorizontalResolution return an array for ...


2

You may use the macro __COUNTER__ and make your class template as follow: template <std::size_t N> struct DeviousHashAlg { /* Your code */ }; #define UNIQUE_DeviousHashAlg DeviousHashAlg<__COUNTER__> And then, for unordered_map<SomeKey, SomeValue, UNIQUE_DeviousHashAlg> map1; unordered_map<SomeKey, SomeValue, ...


2

What you are seeing is a minor symptom of undefined behavior, or an error in the standard, or errors in compilers. The general rule is that a std::function<A(B...)> does not enforce that the signature of passed function objects or pointers exactly match A(B...), but rather that they be compatible. The standard describes this in terms of calling the ...


2

After reading a lot on this topic, I seem to have found an answer in this paper of Altidor, Reichenbach, and Smaragdakis. The main addition that Java generics have in contrast to use-site variance is capture conversion which allows capturing the previously unknown type of a wildcard in a type parameter. This example from the paper explains it best: One ...


2

accumulate deduces its accumulator type from the initial value argument. Try: double sum_mark = accumulate(student_marks.begin(), student_marks.end(), 0.0); ^^^


2

While at compile time the compiler doesn't know K's type, at runtime you are always passing in an object of a specific type. Every object knows what type it is. When you call getClass, you are calling a method on the object, so you get back its actual type.


1

If I understand what you want to do, you need to pass a second argument (the Class of T) to your method like so, public static <T> T[] listToArray(List<T> items, Class<T> cls) { T[] names = (T[]) Array.newInstance(cls, items.size()); for (int i = 0; i < items.size(); i += 1) { names[i] = items.get(i); } return names; } So ...


1

Since you are using the curiously recurring template pattern, there's no need for virtual functions. Your goal of dispatching to the method of the derived class can be achieved directly from the base class. A typical implementation would be the following : #include <iostream> #include <functional> using namespace std; template<typename ...


1

You could wrap a class around your string ID which takes a input string as constructor parameter. This way you can also put methods in your class to provide extra functionality etc, and always have the formatting in one place. Simple example: public class ItemId { private string _id; public string ID { get { return ...


1

accumulate(student_marks.begin(), student_marks.end(), 0); Because you passed in the integer 0, the template was instantiated with the type int, causing all the enumerated doubles to be truncated to integers. You need to pass in a double for your initial value. As a side note, turn on all compiler warnings. Your compiler should warn you about this ...


1

There is a problem with this. In some cases Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_VideoController returns an object with the resolution values unset. e.g. on my system: PS C:\Windows\system32> Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_VideoController | select-object Caption,CurrentHorizontalResolution,CurrentVerticalResolution Caption ...



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