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The closest syntax is as follows: interface MyInterface { [index: string]: any; num: number; func: Function; } var a: MyInterface = { num: 123, func: function () {}, prop1: 'Hello', prop2: 'World' }; The type "any" must be used because the properties "num" and "func" are not strings: While index signatures are a powerful ...


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You need to build a definition for the external JavaScript. The best way to start with this is to look at your usage. For example, I have taken the "Hello World" example from the documentation: function HelloWorld() { var url = 'http://localhost/'; var pl = new SOAPClientParameters(); SOAPClient.invoke(url, "HelloWorld", pl, true, ...


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The Visual Studio "TypeScript Build" section has a checkbox for "Generate source maps" that is tied to the build configuration. Also tsc has the --sourcemap parameter that you can either include (to generate) or exclude (to not). Most node-based builders (such as grunt-ts) also have this functionality via the config json file. Any of these options should ...


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The type information in TypeScript is all erased during compilation, so you can't directly use any of the generic types, for example, at runtime. So here is what you can do... You can create classes by name by passing the name as a string. Yes; this involves waving your magic-string-wand. You also need to be aware of anything in your toolchain that may ...


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The class definition must come before any code that attempts to use it. This usually goes wrong in one of two ways: Oops, I have two files now Problem: You have foo.ts and decide to split it into foo.ts and bar.ts. This compiles into foo.js and bar.js, but your HTML page only says <script src="foo.js"></script> Solution: Fix your HTML page ...


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You can do it. Just replace your instanceOf implementation with this one: public instanceOf(cls: { CLASS_NAME: string; }) { return cls.CLASS_NAME === this.className || super.instanceOf(cls); }


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If you are willing to accept the prototypal nature of JavaScript you can just use instanceof which checks the prototype chain: class Foo{} class Bar extends Foo{} class Bas{} var bar = new Bar(); console.log(bar instanceof Bar); // true console.log(bar instanceof Foo); // true console.log(bar instanceof Object); // true console.log(bar instanceof Bas); ...


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Since you are returning a promise i.e. return deferred.promise you need to use the promise at the other end i.e. : getjsonObjAsync().then((result)=>{ console.log(result); }); PS: prefer $http (and $http.get) over $.ajax.


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It seems that your problem with the non-refreshing UI is a json caching problem. Try to disable jquery ajax caching $.ajaxSetup({ cache: false }); globally or just temporarily for the request which causes the problem. IE is caching JSON responses, you wil find your response as a .json file in the temporary internet files folder :) More information can ...


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I think you might have misunderstood how promises work. They won't magically turn an asynchronous operation into a synchronous one so unless you want to block you won't be returning JSON from your method. The then property of the object you end up returning with your code is a function that registers a handler for the promise, it's used exactly like you did ...


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If you wanted to use it as a service you could do: yourAppModule.service('$',function(){return $;}); Which takes jquery from window and makes it an angular service. But it's just simpler to use jQuery off of window. PS: Its better if you put any DOM access in an angular directive. Controllers really aren't the place for manual DOM manipulation.


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I was pulling in $ in the constructor when with jquery $ you simply need to reference the file. Fixed code: /// <reference path="../../typings/jquery/jquery.d.ts" /> class FileUploadService{ constructor(private $q: ng.IQService, private $http: ng.IHttpService) { } I can now use $. to access jquery methods.


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Here is a full working example of your code... essentially all your interfaces are spot on and you just need to adjust that bit in your loop as you indicated with the ???. The key is setting To get the value, use settings.dictionary[setting] Here is the full code: export interface Settings { dictionary : IDictionary[]; } export interface ...


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Actually, setting is the ID. The value you need to index which you can do using [id] Learn more about for/in : https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Statements/for...in


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declare var SOAPClient: any; Should get you started :)


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That tutorial looks like it might be based on the old Node storage package. We have recently posted a new storage library for node - which can be found here: https://www.npmjs.org/package/azure-storage. Also take a look at the following Getting Started to help get you up and running: Store structured data with Table storage. I will follow up tomorrow to see ...


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Diffing the two it seems to be this PR : https://github.com/borisyankov/DefinitelyTyped/pull/2348/files Would appreciate an issue report : https://github.com/borisyankov/DefinitelyTyped/issues?state=open mentioning the test that fails + PR.


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I followed this one (I'm assuming you probably tried this as well) http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/storage-nodejs-use-table-storage-web-site/ To boil it down to just what you need in javascript ... 1.Create the table in Azure portal with appropriate data/partition key. 2.NPM necessary packages: azure, async 3.Add the following to ...


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You can't use the typescript class syntax to extend an Ember class. You have to use the extend method as you would in normal Javascript. The reason being is that Ember does more than just extend the prototype of the class (as you can see from your computed property not working). If you really want to use the class syntax, I suggest either using EmberScript ...


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A simple solution would be to replace declare with `` and ; with {} ... I think. But there is almost definitely no tool to do this already. You are mostly better off starting a new TypeScript API since JavaScript libs aren't exactly type friendly by default.


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I created a demo project to share code between the client and the server : https://github.com/basarat/demo-fullstack/blob/master/src/Gruntfile.js It compiles the common files for both amd/commonjs and server files only as commonjs with the client only files as only amd. It uses grunt-ts to manage this : https://github.com/grunt-ts/grunt-ts


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Use external modules for both the server and the browser. When compiling for the browser, use the switch to specify the AMD module pattern: tsc --module amd app.ts And use RequireJS to load modules for you. <script src="require.js" data-main="app.js"></script> You will need to compile for the different targets, but the source code in ...


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Use http://browserify.org/ to add CommonJS-like support on the front-end. But also read this (slightly outdated) question and answer: How should I go about writing a node.js web application with both server and client side code?



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