Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

int is not a type in TypeScript. You probably want to use number: var listOfLists : number[][];


0

You need to use another lambda to continue the chain of this : method = () => { ko.utils.arrayForEach(this.array1(), (item) => { // NOTE here while(item.array2().length < this.array3().length){ item.array2.push(0); } }) }


1

the foreach should be a parent element, since that is not possible in your case you should use the comment notation: http://jsbin.com/wideyeku/2/edit?html,js,output <thead> <tr> <th>Name</th> <!-- ko foreach: assignments --> <th><input data-bind="value: workName"/></th> ...


0

You probably have the wrong this. Try: public UpdateName =()=> { var self= this; self.SelectedItem.Name("new name"); self.SelectedItem().Name("new name"); }


0

You would use one or the other, but if you are using TypeScript, I would use the TypeScript classes or you won't get intellisense for them.


1

Remove the .js file extension I.e. require(["../common/events", "./worker-api"]


0

If you were to have many rectangle modules, you have the option to name them however you like when you import them. The module is only placed into your alias, they don't otherwise pollute your scope. For example: import rectangle = require(./rectangle'); import differentRectangle = require('./folder/rectangle'); var rect = new rectangle.Rectangle(); var ...


2

You should never assign an observable like " self.SelectedItem = new Student" That may be your issue. Once you do that, SelectedItem is no longer an observable. You should use self.SelectedItem(new Student()); Your second version of assigning to name is the correct versions: self.SelectedItem().Name("new name");


0

Seems including the .map files in files[] is the only way for now... I've also tried the karma-typescript-preprocessor, but it doesn't currently work due to https://github.com/karma-runner/karma/issues/990


1

As Hans Passant correctly hinted in the comments, the problem was the following ProjectGuid in my .csproj file: {349c5851-65df-11da-9384-00065b846f21} Once I removed that GUID from my project file and reloaded my project, the Typescript tab showed up in the project properties.


1

You cannot test for string[] in the general case but you can test for Array quite easily the same as in JavaScript http://stackoverflow.com/a/767492/390330 If you specifically want for string array you can do something like: if (value instanceof Array) { var somethingIsNotString = false; value.forEach(function(item){ if(typeof item !== ...


0

I have added "TypeScriptToolsVersion" in csproj. <Project> <PropertyGroup> ... <TypeScriptToolsVersion>1.0</TypeScriptToolsVersion> </PropertyGroup> </Project> But it is Visual Studio 2013 RC2.


0

Try this: if (value instanceof Array) { alert('value is Array!'); } else { alert('Not an array'); }


0

You got the lambda correct in the each calls i.e. $.each(result, (index, item) => { You should do the same for the function definitions to ensure that this gets scoped correct all the way through i.e. getInvitations = () => { and getUsers = () => {


0

Inside a jQuery .each() callback, this is always set by jQuery so it won't be what this was in a higher level scope. If you need to access the value of this from the higher level scope, then the usual work-around is to save it to a local variable at that higher level scope and you can then access that local variable from within the .each() callback ...


1

Should we have a unique module name per .ts file Yes use amd/commonjs : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KDrWLMUY0R0&hd=1 per folder Yes create an index.js that exports everything from a folder. When a class is dependent on other classes, should we wrap that .ts file in a require/define (we use require.js) for the dependencies? no. Use ...


0

From this discussion on TS forums, I was able to come up with the following solution: module window { if (window.Foo) return; export module Foo { export var now = new Date() } } This compiles to: var window; (function (window) { if (window.Foo) return; (function (Foo) { Foo.now = new Date(); })(window.Foo ...


0

The VS debugger and TypeScript source map emitter don't yet implement symbol mapping. To understand what's going on, look at the generated code: var Test; (function (Test) { Test.age; function go() { Test.age = 40; return Test.age; } Test.go = go; })(Test || (Test = {})); Test.go(); Note that there is no variable named ...


2

You have to compile the TypeScript file. Then, run the generated .js file in node.


1

Is it possible to get tsc.exe to know about require.config? Unfortunately no. Your two options are to create the def to tell typescript about the config or use full relative paths.


0

There is a sample extension for Visual Commander that runs cppcheck on file save (#2) using DTE.Events.DocumentEvents.DocumentSaved. You can easily adapt it to run your executable instead.


3

It's very easy to write that yourself, and that way you have more control over things.. As the other answers say, TypeScript is not aimed at adding runtime types or functionality. Map: class Map<T> { private items: { [key: stirng]: T }; constructor() { this.items = {}; } add(key: string, value: T): void { ...


0

Starting from VS 2013 Update 2 RC, now you can edit a TypeScript project settings in order to do exactly what was described in the question. To do so, go to the project properties, then select the TypeScript Build tab. In the Output area, check the option Redirect JavaScript output to directory and define which directory you want to copy your JavaScript ...


2

Did they add a runtime List<> and/or Map<> type class to typepad 1.0 No, providing a runtime is not the focus of the TypeScript team. is there a solid library out there someone wrote that provides this functionality? I wrote (really just ported over buckets to typescript): https://github.com/basarat/typescript-collections


1

No. But if you have node installed you can run ttslint from the common line. Just do ""npm install tslint -g" See https://www.npmjs.org/package/tslint


0

You have MyItem subscribing for changes on its own active property in order to inform a third-party entity, MyViewModel, when changes occur. The dilemma is that MyItem doesn't really know exactly who the third-party is. Instead, you can simply have MyViewModel subscribe to the active property on MyItem itself, since MyViewModel is the one that cares about ...


0

An alternative is to change the click binding to use JavaScript's bind function to force the value of this to be your view model: data-bind="click: $root.MyFunc.bind($root)". Note that $data and the click event object will still be passed in as arguments to MyFunc from Knockout as described by the click binding specification. If you need to override the ...


0

If you change your function signature from MyFunc() { } to be in lambda form MyFunc = () => { } as suggested by the accepted answer, you will find that your function is no longer a shared prototype function for your class, but is instead duplicated as a function variable for each instance of the class. An alternative is to change the click binding to use ...


0

I have used TypeScript for a while now and I really like it. It was a little difficult in the beginning but the community is growing. I see more than 30 posts everyday on TypeScript forum. I like TypeScript because it is fairly easy to learn and make your life so much easier because of its debugging capabilities and intellisense and more. TypeScipt does ...


0

Compile on save is specific to typescript and not available as a build step. You can do that using external tools e.g combine https://github.com/gruntjs/grunt-contrib-watch and https://github.com/grunt-ts/grunt-ts


0

To debug my solution I done this way. In ProjectAPI.proj <Project> ... <PropertyGroup Condition="'$(Configuration)' == 'Debug'"> <TypeScriptTarget>ES5</TypeScriptTarget> <TypeScriptIncludeComments>true</TypeScriptIncludeComments> <TypeScriptSourceMap>true</TypeScriptSourceMap> ...


0

There are two other ways besides the one mentioned by @basarat to ensure that the imported module is included in the define function and thus loaded. Include the amd-dependency element at the top of your TypeScript file. ///<amd-dependency path="pathToFileRelativeToBaseWithoutFileExtension"/> or import moduleName = ...


0

There should not be any exception thrown, given you are accessing it correctly. Undefined members like class A { private STATIC: string; } have a value of undefined which is consistent with normal Javascript: var something; // undefined Typescript previously initializing it to "" is actually "incorrect" (compared to similar languages). It certainly ...


1

It doesn't need to explicitly mention them in the compiled JavaScript because it is a dynamic language that allows the property to be added when they are first used, for example when you set the value... Because the property is static, you should access it via the class name. In the example below, User._name. class User { private static _name: string; ...


2

You can listen to addFeature event which will be fired for each feature in your json. e.g. if you use https://storage.googleapis.com/maps-devrel/google.json six events are raised after the json request is completed i.e. when google api starts adding the features from the json file: You can see the demo here : http://jsbin.com/ofutUbA/4/edit


0

One would assume, if you are using knockout, to maybe bind onto some listeners, or attach listeners to an event. Most events through JavaScript always have a callback function, this is good practive so that once a function has finished executing some long I/O or Database query it will immediately execute that function. Obviously that callback will be ...


2

You can use typestring : https://github.com/gavinhungry/typestring to compile the TS to JS. Then simply execute the JS using eval. However do not do this in production as it is going to be slow (and possibly unsafe). You can use browserify to load npm packages in the browser.


0

Thank you kindly for the quick answer. Yes, while missing selection-menu-items for TS, I can do some TS this way: first add a new file as Javascript-file, then put in some code and then rename it to TS. If i do this in a ASP.Net-project and not in a website-project, it will be displayed with the right TS-Logo as favicon (ico). But then it will be treated as ...


1

The above has a compile error where it says "Public property 'format' of exported class has or is using private type 'DocumentFormat'. Simply export : module LayoutEngine { export enum DocumentFormat { DOCX = 1 }; export class DocHeader { public format : DocumentFormat; } } Is there a way to place the enum ...


1

TypeScript uses JSDoc. e.g. /** This is a description of the foo function. */ function foo() { } To learn jsdoc : http://usejsdoc.org/ But you don't need to use the type annotation extensions in JSDoc.


0

You can use comments like in regular JavaScript: TypeScript syntax is a superset of Ecmascript 5 (ES5) syntax. [...] This document describes the syntactic grammar added by TypeScript Other than that, I only found this about comments in the language specs: TypeScript also provides to JavaScript programmers a system of optional type annotations. ...


0

This is not a particularly elegant answer, but here's what I do on a tight deadline: grid.dataSource['transport'].options.read.url = newDataSource; To me this is generally not advised as the whole reason you're using typescript is to maintain type safety, however in the case of 3rd party libraries I do make exceptions here and there by casting to any or ...


1

If you enable source control on your mobile service, you can upload your scripts via git. This would enable a workflow where you write your scripts in TS, run the compiler to output JS, and you commit the generated js files to your repository and push them to the server. Unfortunately I do not have any advice regarding tooling support.


1

Are you exporting the classes correctly? I think you need to "export" the class WorkerApi So your code should be module LayoutEngine { export class WorkerApi { private worker : Worker; constructor() { debugger; this.worker = new Worker("layout-worker.js"); } And then, import them like this var ...


1

I too have been experiencing this problem. I am sorry to say that I do not know what the root of the problem is. However, I have found a workaround. Open your project properties and go to the 'TypeScript Build' tab. In the 'Debugging' section, check the 'Specify root directory of the source maps' option and enter the value $(ProjectDir)\Scripts. This ...


0

Do you see a .map file along w/ a .js file? When you compile your Typescript you need to use the compiler option of -sourcemap This will create a .map file that VS2013 uses to know how to map the js file to your typescript file. so in your folder you should see: file.ts file.js file.js.map


1

After being asked for an example in the comments, I decided to post this as a separate answer to make it easier to distinguish between them. Of course there is a lot to improve. For example one thing that could be done is to allow attaching handlers to the promise even after the deferred has been resolved (they will just fire immediately). That way the ...


4

You are correct; void is the correct way to type this function's return value. In practice, there isn't really a difference between any and void return types in callback positions because the compiler does not enforce that functions with a type of any have a return statement.


1

I made a possible solution for your problem. It is a simple extender which binds two observables together. http://jsfiddle.net/vBrw2/4/ ko.extenders['bind'] = function (target, option) { var prop = option.property; var self = option.self; target.subscribe(function (newValue) { var oldValue = target['oldValue']; ...


0

There's no template for it for some reason, but if you just add a new file to your project, and use the .ts extension, the TypeScript compiler should work when you save the file. In Update 2 RC, Visual Studio doesn't show the file as being nested anymore either. It's just a "TS" file.



Top 50 recent answers are included