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264

I'm the creator of Wordle. Here's how Wordle actually works: Count the words, throw away boring words, and sort by the count, descending. Keep the top N words for some N. Assign each word a font size proportional to its count. Generate a Java2D Shape for each word, using the Java2D API. Each word "wants" to be somewhere, such as "at some random x position ...


53

Firstly, this is purely a design-related problem and solution. The design of your grid specifies if justifying text is needed. I think justify align alone has no major effect on usability. Bad typography that makes text illegible is what decreases usability. That said, make sure you have solid contrasts and a good balance of spacing in your type. Font-size ...


37

Point sizes are defined as 1/72 of an inch. That is, a 72-point font is approximately 1 inch from the lowest descent to the highest ascent. So the maximum height of a glyph in a 72pt font is about 1 inch. Apple's iphone tech specs page claims that the iPhone currently has a resolution of 163 pixels per inch. So 72 points is 163 pixels, or about 2.2639 ...


23

Hmmm... no. If the only problem is the fact that &thinsp; (U+2009) is still breaking, I will prefer to use: <span style="white-space:nowrap">&thinsp;</span> to correct the breaking behavior. Why? Because the French fine is effectively using a nearly fixed width between one sixth to one fourth of a cadratin (0.166 ca. to 0.25 ca., when ...


23

I've implemented an algorithm as described by Jonathan Feinberg using python to create a tag cloud. It is far away from the beautiful clouds of wordle.net but it gives you an idea how it could be done. You can find the project here.


22

text-align: justify shouldn't be used in browsers at the moment. They aren't good at handling the minute details within and the output ends up containing lots of rivers and there's no support for hyphenation (other than soft hyphens). Note above was written 4.5 years ago. Things are slowly changing... http://caniuse.com/#feat=css-hyphens Edit: Hyphenator ...


21

I've created a Silverlight component that uses the algorithm Jonathan suggests here. The source code and example projects are all available on my blog: http://whydoidoit.com My cloud lets you color and size words based on different weightings and it supports word selection (from a coordinate) and selected word highlighting. The source is yours to use ...


20

There is no strict rule, but bear in mind that the * attaches to the variable, so: char *str1, *str2; // str1 and str2 are pointers char* str1, str2; // str1 is a pointer, str2 is a char Some people like to do char * str1 as well, but it's up to you or your company's coding standard.


19

Thank you very much for quick responces! Actually, both comments by hop and Charlie Martin were useful. lettrine.sty is a fantastic package, and it works if scaleable fonts are used. So, the solution was to force Type 1 CM fonts instead of default CM and use lettrine.sty. lettrine.sty documentation suggests to \usepackage{type1cm}. This works: ...


19

There are two comprehensive reference guides/recipe books for TeX: TeX by Topic by Victor Eijkhout TeX for the Impatient by Paul Abrahams, Kathryn Hargreaves, and Karl Berry In both cases, the sources are also available. As lindelof mentions, the TeXBook is also available, albeit in a form that prevents compilation (Knuth wished people to look at the ...


19

Here's a really nice javascript one from Jason Davies that uses d3. You can even use webfonts with it. Demo: http://www.jasondavies.com/wordcloud/ Github: https://github.com/jasondavies/d3-cloud


17

Oh good lord you're screwed. Take a look at this Basically, there are so many things you want to strip out. Plus, there's stuff that's valid, but could be used in malicious ways. What if the user wants to set their font size smaller on a footnote? Do you care if that get applied to your entire page? How about setting colors? Now all the words on your ...


17

To match font sizes (in Points) on the iPhone4 with font sizes (in Points) in Photoshop you have to set your Photoshop document to 144dpi. I have run a number of tests and that's the resolution that produces 1:1 results. Steps: Take a screenshot of “Settings » General » Accessibility » Large Text” on an iPhone4 Open the screenshot in Photoshop Change the ...


16

&thinsp; (thin space) should do and &nbsp; has not the same with as an &mdash; (—), to separate numbers you should use a narrow no-break space (U+202F). as others have mentioned, you are better off using the css property word-spacing to define the width of your spaces. it's probably a good idea to combine it with white-space:no-break;


12

The problems brought up by others about justify alignment are more prevalent with narrow columns. If your columns are wide enough in relation to the size of your fonts and other parameters then it's ok to justify the text. Let's say you'd want a minimum of 12 to 15 words per line in average. More is better.


12

Web fonts are supported in Safari 3.1, the upcoming Firefox 3.5 and the upcoming Opera 10. Internet Explore has supported a (different) format since IE4. At this point, the biggest problems with the implementation in Safari, Firefox and Opera is that they require you to upload the original font file to your web server. For many fonts, this would constitute ...


12

They are defined by each browser maker independently. They are not uniform across browsers and are there for semantics (Large header, slightly smaller header etc...). If you look at the HTML 4 specification for these, there no mention of how they are supposed to be styled, only that they should be. From the spec: Visual browsers usually render more ...


12

I'm working on WordCram, a Processing library for making word clouds. It's pretty heavily influenced by Wordle, and is informed by the same PDF aeby linked to above. It handles the collision detection for you, and lets you focus on how you want your words laid out, colored, rotated, etc.


12

You can avoid orphaned words by replacing the space between the last two words in a sentence with a non-breaking space (&nbsp;). There are plugins out there that does this, for example jqWidon't or this jquery snippet. There are also plugins for popular frameworks (such as typogrify for django and widon't for wordpress) that essentially does the same ...


11

You can use white-space: pre-wrap to preserve sequences of spaces, while still wrapping text: <p style="white-space: pre-wrap;">Lorem ipsum. Dolor sit amet.</p> This is not supported in IE until IE 8 in IE 8 mode, nor in Firefox until 3.0. You could also use &emsp; or &ensp; for spaces one em or one en wide. I do not know how ...


11

The Unicode character U+2002 EN SPACE (&#x2002;, &#8194; or as entity reference &ensp;) is a space with en width.


11

As everyone else mentioned, it's not possible to do this with only NSAttributedString. Nikolai has the right approach, using CTFrameSetters. However it is possible to tell the framesetter to render text in a specific area (i.e. defined by a CGPath). You'll have to create 2 framesetters, one for the drop cap and the other for the rest of the text. Then, ...


10

It is browser-dependant, as other say. On the other side, there is a rule in typography to set font sizes: if the base font has size X, the larger fonts should grow exponentially; the usual way is to have sizes X*sqrt(2), X*sqrt(2)^2, X*sqrt(2)^3 and so on, but you can change the base. However, computer fonts have some special requirements. They used to ...


10

No. Except for :first-letter and other pseudo-classes, you can't target single characters using CSS. You'd need to wrap the character into an element (e.g. a <span>) to specify a style for it. You can work around this using Javascript - there are jQuery based solutions for this here on SO. But it's kludgy.


10

You could do so : var fontSize = parseInt($("body").css("font-size")); fontSize = fontSize + 1 + "px"; $("body").css({'font-size':fontSize}); jsFiddle example here


10

Quoting from the PDF specification ISO 32000-1:2008 as published by Adobe: 14.11.2 Page Boundaries 14.11.2.1 General A PDF page may be prepared either for a finished medium, such as a sheet of paper, or as part of a prepress process in which the content of the page is placed on an intermediate medium, such as film or an imposed ...


9

The common C convention is to write T *p, whereas the common C++ convention is to write T* p. Both parse as T (*p); the * is part of the declarator, not the type specifier. It's purely an accident of pointer declaration syntax that you can write it either way. C (and by extension, C++) declaration syntax is expression-centric; IOW, the form of a ...


9

This is from Microsoft's own stylesheet for Windows 8 (Metro) apps: /* Explicitly define a Segoe UI font-family so that we can assign Segoe UI Semilight to an appropriate font-weight. */ @font-face { font-family: "Segoe UI"; font-weight: 200; src: local("Segoe UI Light"); } @font-face { font-family: "Segoe UI"; font-weight: 300; ...


9

OP, Updated fiddle that includes all vendor prefixes for transform and transform-origin:http://jsfiddle.net/LTaAy/1/ See this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/LTaAy/ IMG HTML <p class="doubleWidth">DOUBLE WIDTH</p> <p class="doubleHeight">Double Height</p> <p class="doubleWidthandHeight">Double Width and ...


8

It depends on the font used. If you use a fixed width font, it'll be equal to length. If you use other fonts, it'll be something else. Any such function would have to depend on the font used for rendering.



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