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31

What is the difference between them? Image: the generic Linux kernel binary image file. zImage: a compressed version of the Linux kernel image that is self-extracting. uImage: an image file that has a U-Boot wrapper (installed by the mkimage utility) that includes the OS type and loader information. A very common practice (e.g. the typical Linux ...


11

To port u-boot, the u-boot.lds can probably be used from the cpu directory and not the board directory. In other words, there is probably no need to port this file. However, if there is then here is an overview. You can find lots of information in the LD documentation. In general, what LD scripts allow you to do is to override the default places that the ...


10

For flash devices, either NAND or NOR, there is no partition table on the device itself. That is, you can't read the device in a flash reader and find some table that indicates how many partitions are on the device and where each partition begins and ends. There is only an undifferentiated sequence of blocks. This is a fundamental difference between MTD ...


9

Where, how that first bootloader is is heavily system dependent. You might have some sort of usb bootable device that enumerates and downloads firmware to ram all in hardware then the processor boots from that ram. Normally yes the first boot is some sort of flash. It is a good idea to have that first bootloader uber simple, essentially 100% bug free and ...


9

uboot.bin is the bootloader, i.e. uboot, uImage.bin is the kernel image Usually, in embedded systems the NAND flash is partitioned in four parts: A partition for the bootloader (here goes uboot.bin) A small partition where uboot saves its environment variables A partition for the kernel (here goes uImage.bin) A partition for the rootfs


7

The package you are looking for is named u-boot-tools.


6

It is possible to modify U-boot memory map. you need to modify source code of U-boot .U-boot/include/configs/<board_name.h> is the place where you can configure memory map . where <board_name.h> is your architecture specific file and has #define entries which you can change to desirable values. u-boot/arch/<architecture_name>/lib/board.c ...


6

BusyBox acts as the "init" process on the system; if you remove it then you need to find a new init to replace it with.


6

A ramdisk merely refers to an in-memory disk image. It is implemented using the ramfs VFS driver in the kernel. The contents of the ramdisk would be wiped on the next reboot or power-cycle. I'll give you details about initrd and initramfs next. In simple terms, both initrd and initramfs refers to an early stage userspace root filesystem (aka rootfs) that ...


5

The first-stage bootloader doesn't have to be read-only - but putting a read-only bootloader in ROM with some recovery mode is helpful in case you corrupt the read-write parts of flash; otherwise you'll need to physically attach a programmer to the flash chip in order to recover.


5

You can just set you bootcmd variable to 'bootm 80000000; bootm 820000000'. If the first bootm fails (which it will if the CRC check fails) then the second will run. If the first succeeds then the second never gets a chance to run. Uboot does support a scripting mechanism with constructs like 'for' and 'if' e.g.: for part in ${partition_list} do if nfs ...


5

We seem to have ported Das U-Boot successfully. There's evidence that that is a faulty assumption. Just before calling the kernel, the pointer theKernel is 10008000 and not 10800000. Which version of U-Boot are you using? In both 2012.10 and 2013.04 versions of U-Boot, the variable theKernel is only declared and used by code for arches like ...


5

First of first, uboot will start at start.S of the specify CPU, like this: http://git.denx.de/cgi-bin/gitweb.cgi?p=u-boot.git;a=blob;f=arch/arm/cpu/armv7/start.S;h=ef62fc83270a327bc7df970f598540f1d7ce0fe2;hb=HEAD It will do some stuff like "exception vector" setup, cache setup, etc. Then it will jump to ...


5

On your kit, try help env and look for "env default". env default [-f] var [...] - [forcibly] reset variable(s) to their default values That sounds like what you are looking for. env default -a does a nonpersistent change, then "printenv" shows the defaults. To change defaults, you would rebuild your u-boot.bin with changes e.g. to ...


5

There are three file paths involved here: The patch's original file: u-boot-2013.01/arch/powerpc/cpu/mpc85xx/cpu_init.c The patch's target file: u-boot-2013.01.modified/arch/powerpc/cpu/mpc85xx/cpu_init.c The stripped target file due to -p1: arch/powerpc/cpu/mpc85xx/cpu_init.c Patch looks for the stripped target file, and it doesn't exist. cd ...


5

yes yes it depends. What's happening is that the scheduler picks the best CPU (let's define it as any one of: physical cpu, core, hyperthread) for your process to run depending on a lot of variables. Generally a scheduler will attempt to keep a process on the same CPU to avoid expensive cache and TLB misses between CPUs, but it has to make a trade-off ...


5

U-Boot changes required : A. Make sure the CONFIG_CMDLINE_TAG/CONFIG_SETUP_MEMORY_TAGS/CONFIG_INITRD_TAG are defined in you project definition header file ( u-boot/include/configs/am335x_evm.h ), and we can add our own tag here, eg. CONFIG_CUSTOM_TAG. B. Add the structure definition you wanna append w/ ATAG in u-boot/include/asm-arm/setup.h, eg. ...


4

When the system is rebooted using LINUX_REBOOT_CMD_RESTART2, the supplied command string is passed to all of the notifiers registered with register_reboot_notifer(), and finally to machine_restart() - the architecture-specific function that actually performs system restart. Most architectures ignore the passed command entirely - for an example of one that ...


4

I am not sure if it is in all u-boot versions or not, but there should be a test command for comparison. Can you try: if test "${a}" = "${b}"; then echo "same"; fi Unfortunately I don't have access to u-boot, so this is all from memory.


4

You can prepare an sd-card with the x-loader(MLO) and u-boot.bin and boot from it as follows: Power-off beagleboard Copy MLO and u-boot.bin onto an sd-card(FAT32 partition). Insert the sd-card Press and hold the "user" key on the board Power on the board (do NOT release the "user" key yet) This forces the beagle to boot from sdcard. If both MLO and ...


4

You could use a custom ATAG to either pass the data block or to pass the address & length of the data. Note that the "A" in ATAG stands for ARM, so this solution is not portable to other architectures. An ATAG is preferable to a command-line bootarg IMO because you do not want the user to muck with physical memory addresses. Also the Linux kernel will ...


4

OK, the answer is found. For some unclear reason Texas Instruments, manufacturer of the board DM365EVM which I use for development, provides the kernel with different BBT structure. They defined BBT offset as 2, while all the world, including the provided u-boot, defines this offset as 8. I wish them a good health for many years.


4

The ARM vectors all interrupts to address 0xFFFF0018 (or 0x00000018). This is typically an unconditional branch. Then the code will inspect some interrupt controller hardware to determine the number 56. Typically, there is a routine to set the handler for the interrupt number, so you don't manually patch the code; this table is dependent on how the u-boot ...


4

This question comes up frequently. Good answers sometimes too. I agree it is handy to load the build to SDRAM during development. That works for me, I do it all the time. I have some special boot code in flash which does not enable MMU/cache. For my u-boot builds I switch CONFIG_SYS_TEXT_BASE between flash and ram builds. I run my development builds that ...


4

The latest Linux kernel is attempting to obsolete ATAGS with device trees. However, the setup.h file defines the different ATAG values and structures. To parse these, you need to add them with something like, static int __init parse_tag_custom(const struct tag *tag) { if (tag->hdr.size > CUSTOM_SIZE) { /* Use, storing or acting on ...


4

This problem can be caused by a number of reasons. The most common reasons are listed below. Cause #1 - The linux console boot parameter is incorrect: For example, by default the OMAP3 beagle-board displays console messages on the UART3 port and the default configuration of UART3 port is 115200 baud, 8-bit data, no parity and no flow control. Hence, ...


4

You are right in assuming that the board files and device-trees are required for initialisation of on-chip blocks and off-chip peripherals. While booting-up, the respective drivers for all on-chip blocks of an SoC and off-chip peripherals interfaced to it need to be "probed" i.e. loaded and called. On bus-es like USB and PCI, the peripherals can be ...


4

The (old) method to pass data between U-Boot and the Linux ARM kernel is called the ATAG memory list. Information such as usable memory regions, machine type and board information are passed from U-Boot to the Linux ARM kernel using this data list. In U-Boot, ATAGs are built in lib_arm/armlinix.c (1.1.5) or lib_arm/bootm.c (2009.08), and require the ...


4

Follow this procedure , To achieve this goal, there're 2 parts need to be modified. One is the U-Boot, and the other one is the Linux kernel. 1. U-Boot changes required : A. Make sure the CONFIG_CMDLINE_TAG/CONFIG_SETUP_MEMORY_TAGS/CONFIG_INITRD_TAG are defined in you project definition header file ( u-boot/include/configs/am335x_evm.h ...


3

The platform is ARM. min_addr and max_addr will not work on these platform since these are for Intel-only implementations. For the ARM platform try to look at "mem=size@start" kernel parameter. Read up on Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt and arch/arm/kernel/setup.c. This option is available on most new Linux code base (ie. 2.6.XX).



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