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It looks like this particular SD card I am using wasn't getting formatted (partitions file system) properly on a virtual machine. I was running Ubuntu 14 on VirtualBox. I then formatted on a laptop running ubuntu and re-wrote the SD card. It booted up just fine!


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A script file is ideal for this situation. Its much better than copy & pasting for many commands and can handle much more complexity. You can enter all your commands into a text file and create a script image using mkimage (where myscript is the text file's name): mkimage -T script -C none -n 'My Script' -d myscript myscript.img Then you can simply ...


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I have been able to use PuTTY to copy and paste my variables into U-Boot. You can separate the declarations by semicolons to if you want to do all of the variables at once, like this: setenv ipaddr 192.168.1.5; setenv serverip 192.168.1.10;


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This is ARM code, but it sounds very much like it's being jumped to in Thumb state. The word e59f00f4 will be interpreted in Thumb as lsls r4, r6, #3; b 0x80304bde (if I've got my address maths right), which seems consistent with "jumping somewhere in the middle of some function". You can verify by checking bit 5 of the CPSR (assuming you're not in user ...


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Could it be that the file that U-Boot is loading is actually the binary image of vmlinux file instead the self-extracting zImage/bzImage? It's just a guess, I'm not an expert on this. This question I recently asked on Unix Stack Exchange could be of interest for you: http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/197225/is-vmlinuz-and-bzimage-really-the-same


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I think a main reason can be found in "more than one core" CPUs. Very important in case of asymmetrical cores, eg. i.MX6SoloX (Cortex A9 and Cortex M4 on single chip). For example in i.MX6SoloX if the slave core (M5) run on RAM (DDR) the main core (A9) is the main cpu that has to provide the M4 core code loaded into RAM at the correct position. Those cores ...


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Simple embedded MCUs usually do not have any means to "snoop" the bus checking if anybody (even itself) invalidates cache contents with writes to cached memory addresses. If your MCU has separate data and instruction caches (which most modern MCUs have) and you copy code as data from flash to RAM, you need to flush the data cache (to ensure everything you ...


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You should have been able to use yocto to generate the rootfs. It usually ends up in the same directory as where the image and dtb are generated.


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correct string would be stty -F /dev/ttyUSB0 cs8 -parenb -cstopb -clocal raw speed 115200 ( according to this web page: http://www.devtal.de/wiki/Benutzer:Rdiez/SerialPortTipsForLinux) since i assume you are not using any modem controls and you have a null modem cable between the device and the PC. Minicom has to be set first via minicom -s since you have to ...


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Your board is not in mainline u-boot. The Exynos4412 chip is only supported in the Odroid board, and not the board you are using. It is NOT good practice to modify the refresh rate after the bootloader has set it.


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Initrd. Use RAM to store your rootfs. Here is an example http://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/ltib/2010-05/msg00071.html Who knows may be it will help.


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-mshort-load-bytes is an old option which has been replaced in GCC 3 by -malignment-traps. It only matters for old versions of ARM architecture, before ARMv4. It tells the GCC to not load short (2 byte) values by loading words (4 byte) values from an unaligned location, because that would cause an alignment trap. References: gcc 3.0.2 and gcc 2.95.3 docs.


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u-boot.bin is the binary compiled U-Boot bootloader. u-boot.img contains u-boot.bin along with an additional header to be used by the boot ROM to determine how and where to load and execute U-Boot. The way in which these files are deployed can depend upon the nature of your device, its boot ROM and where the files are loaded from. Boot ROMs are generally ...



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