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-1

Do you have to use sockets? Why not using GCM? enter link description here Its the best for android solutions. I tried to implement it with sockets but had many problems. For example, you will have to make a service, and set an ungoing notification to persiste the service in memory.


0

You are broadcasting the packet, so you are picking it back up through the network interface. Did you try filtering received packets based on the source IP? (If the source IP is yourself, packet is discarded) See this question for more info. EDIT: For your case: receivedPacket = new DatagramPacket(buffer, buffer.length); ...


1

Given your conceptual outline, I think there is an issue at point 4. Although A punches a hole through its own NAT, when B attempts to reach this hole it is unaware of the port on A's NAT (or more correctly/commonly - NAPT) and hence A's NAT drops the packet when B attempts to communicate.


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The call to sendto() doesn't appear to be right as shown, even corrected per the comments: Original: sendto(sd, buffer, htons(20)/ip_header->ip_len/,...); Orr as corrected: sendto(sd, buffer, 20/ip_header->ip_len/,...); The data length parameter should be the sum of header and data lengths: 20+8+12 = 40. A general solution could be: sendto(sd, buffer, ...


2

stdafx.h needs to be included before anything else or the winsock2.h and iostream includes will be ignored. stdafx.h is a file, generated by Microsoft Visual Studio IDE wizards, that describes both standard system and project specific include files that are used frequently but hardly ever change. Compatible compilers (for example, Visual C++ 6.0 and newer) ...


0

The final solution to this problem was to disable Reverse Path Forwarding (RPF) on the interface. There are security implications here, but after careful review this was the correct path forward in this particular case. RPF was turned off by modifying /etc/sysctl.conf: net.ipv4.conf.eth0.rp_filter=0 Some more information on RPF: Wikipedia - Reverse ...


1

Icecast and SHOUTcast both use TCP for both the source streams and streaming to end clients. There are many reasons this is beneficial: The codecs used by most internet radio stations do not lend themselves well to having lost chunks of data. If the stream were corrupt, either by lost or out-of-order packets, the decoder will sometimes be able to re-sync ...


0

No you can not assume that. It may happen or it may not happen, it is up to the writers of the software of the NAT firewall the client is punching through. A complex software may detect that you are talking to the same server but a different port and reuse the outbound port, but simpler software (the kind you would frequently see on home routers) may be ...


0

Not sure why 255.255.255.255 isn't working for you. However, I've never used that as a broadcast IP myself. When I send a broadcast packet I usually derive the broadcast IP from my subnet mask, i.e. if your subnet mask is 255.255.255.0 (/24) and say your IP is 192.168.0.5, then to send a UDP broadcast your destination IP should be 192.168.0.255.


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I don't really understand what the point is of blocking it on your individual computer if the router already blocks it (nor do I understand why they would block it 'en masse', but whatever...) Control Panel | Windows Firewall | Advanced Settings | Outbound Rules Click on New Rule on the right, then select Port Rule, select UDP, in "specific remote ports" ...


0

UDP may drop packets and it may send packets out of order. Ordering the packets is trivial. But if a packet has been dropped, there can be no way of recovering it. However, many systems that do UDP will provide you with another stream with duplicate data. In which case you can simply create a back up with the secondary stream and then update check if the ...


1

You said I have to listen to a Connection-less UDP Multicast In your comment you clarified the meaning of your question: Connection-less means I do not have to subscribe to any multicast group Well, that isn't possible. The only way for your computer to receive multicast traffic is for your router to forward it to you, and the router only does ...


0

I've solved a similar problem by adding the following to /etc/sudoers (or in a file in /etc/sudoers.d): myuser myhost=(root) NOPASSWD: /usr/bin/fping Then instead of using fping directory, use sudo fping.


0

An unused ephemeral port is chosen. These are usually in the range 32768-65535, but there's usually a kernel configuration that specifies the range.


2

Below is some sample Unix code. If this is Windows programming: "sock" should be of type SOCKET instead of int. Use closesocket instead of close #include <winsock2.h> instead of all those unix headers #include <sys/types.h> #include <unistd.h> #include <sys/types.h> #include <sys/socket.h> #include <netinet/in.h> ...


0

well, after some tests and trials, it is possible. however, libpcap does not support it directly. what should be done is open a pcap handler specifying ethernet data type, and then access the bytes in the udp packet as if you access the ethernet packet. the filter offsets start from the beginning of the packet, but the 'packet' depends on the layer you ...


0

UDP is unreliable http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User_Datagram_Protocol It does not guarantee even delivery not only the sequence. Simplistic way (that I implemented some time ago) was to generate a sequence number and include it in UDP packet. Once the transmission is completed the recipient(s) were required to confirm start and end sequence packets received ...


2

Reassembly occurs at the IP layer, and is transparent to you. In short you don't need to be concerned about it, other than for performance reasons, unless you are splitting up the packets yourself.


0

Thanks for your help, the problem was : This program runs in a loop, so I was opening and closing the socket at the wrong time.


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I am not an expert on python, but a bit of an expert on video streaming, and I suspect you might think of it in a wrong way from the very beginning. When you join multicast and receive the stream, it has little to do with static pictures. Video would normally be encoded according to H.264 standard, and frames are structured in so called group of pictures ...


0

Or you can bind multiple sockets, wrap them into streams and then combine streams to get feeling of one single socket.


0

Windows Phone 8 uses a subset of the .NET 4.5 framework, so not everything is available.


1

okay I got the answer of my own question. Actually I was sending a udp packet on network in main thread and it is not allow to send packet on a network in main thread. Thanks


0

If in the stream is also the header of the file (image), it contains the info about the format, for example see wiki for BMP file format


0

I initially began designing it in TCP but I found it to be too slow so I switched to UDP. I recommend reading this before you come into such conclusion: udp-vs-tcp-how-much-faster-is-it. In most situration TCP is fairly good. I'm getting 400K packets per second for my TCP-based server running ping-pong test on entry level xeon i7 with dual NIC, and ...


1

Why not use a union, of structs, where the 1st member gives the type of the struct and is common to all structs in the union. Your quick and easy approach isn't far off, since if all you have is 10 numbers the headers of the packets are going to dominate your bandwidth usage anyway. You really don't want one packet to check the type on the next - that is ...


1

Good thing you already caught on to UDP sometimes reordering messages in arbitrary ways. Your solution of always sending the same struct containing all possible info is nearly correct: Define yourself a base message, like e.g.: struct msg_common{uint8_t sender, receiver; uint16_t message_id;}; // Take note that I used fixed-width types here! And make ...


1

I've written one: PyPunchP2P. See if someone can make use of it.


0

"I assume that the majority of gameplay data (e.g. fine player movements) will need to be sent via UDP connections. I'm unfamiliar with UDP connections so I really don't know where to begin designing the server." UDP can be lower latency, but sometimes, it is far more important that packets aren't dropped in a game. If it makes any difference to ...


1

Restating the problem: you have a worker thread in charge of processing some data, and a monitor thread which controls the worker's activity. You wish to know why there is a latency in stopping the worker thread through a mutex contention lock. A mutex may block a thread only when this thread is trying to lock it. If that thread is going through some ...


1

With UDP you cannot send messages bigger than 64KB. Use TCP, or split the payload yourself into multiple messages which will be extremely complex because messages can be lost. ReceiveBufferSize is not what you think it is. It almost never helps to use it. Code for sender and receiver is missing but sender.Connect looks strange given that UDP is ...


2

And when receive buffer is overflowing, then [the] first datagram [is] remove[d] No. When a datagram arrives and the receive buffer is already full, the new datagram is dropped. Processing of the buffer doesn't occur at all.


0

I can vaguely remember having messed up paths with different Visual Studio versions / Platform SDKs installed. Do you have multiple installations? Maybe you need to fix your search paths manually. And btw, with VS2013 Express on my home computer, I don't even have v7.0, only 7.0A.


2

UDP is inherently unreliable in the sense that: UDP packets may be lost, and the UDP protocol provides no mechanism to tell if packets have been lost, or to resend them. Why are packets getting dropped? In general, there are a number of possible reasons: packets may be misrouted, packets may be "eaten" by a firewall, packets may be dropped due to ...


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Try to check telnet serverip 4000 from your machine, to check if 4000 port is reachable. If not most likely it is firewall issue as pointed by Steffen.


2

bind() doesn't set up the destination address, it sets up the local (source) address. You need to use connect() to establish the destination address. UDP is ofcourse connectionless, but calling connect() will allow you to associate the socket with a remote address - this allows you to use write() and send() on the socket. However, the socket will then only ...


2

server_socket.bind(('localhost', port_number)) This is your problem - you need to bind to all interfaces, otherwise only connections from the same machine will be successful. Do this: # bind to all interfaces server_socket.bind(('0.0.0.0', port_number))


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There will be no tunnel for UDP, just because you have a successful TCP connection. You have to establish the UDP connection the same way you got the TCP connection. E.g. if the TCP connection was established from intern to outside you have to do the same with UDP, otherwise the NAT device will not establish a connection for the UDP connection and thus ...


2

You have a misconception that recvfrom pulls data from a particular source address. recvfrom is generally used for connectionless protocols like UDP. When an UDP packet is received, it could be from any source address. src_addr returns this address for the application usage. If you are expecting messages only from a particular address, there are 2 ways. ...


0

I thing I found the solution. refer to : http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man7/ip.7.html https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=231899 The linux have a bug that the broadcast IP_ADD_MEMBERSHIP is a global action to all sockets even it is another process. We need to set the option IP_MULTICAST_ALL to fix this problem.


0

The number of bytes received is returned by the socket_recvfrom() function itself. Form the documentation to socket_recvfrom(): Return Values socket_recvfrom() returns the number of bytes received, or FALSE if there was an error. So do only use as much bytes from $buf as indictaed by socket_recvfrom() return value, if not FALSE.


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From the Qt documentation about QUdpSocket Class : Note: An incoming datagram should be read when you receive the readyRead() signal, otherwise this signal will not be emitted for the next datagram. So it seems that you are not reading the entire datagram in each call of onDataRead. You don't specify host and port in readDatagram. I am not sure if ...


-2

Server public void serverThread() { UdpClient udpClient = new UdpClient(8080); while(true) { IPEndPoint RemoteIpEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, 0); Byte[] receiveBytes = udpClient.Receive(ref RemoteIpEndPoint); string returnData = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(receiveBytes); lbConnections.Items.Add( RemoteIpEndPoint.Address.ToString() + ":" + ...


0

Why not try using a thread? Something like this would work: //create a thread Thread t = new Thread() { @Override public void run() { while (true) { try { //do your stuff Thread.sleep(5000); //thread to sleep for 5 seconds (5000 milliseconds) ...


1

You are not requesting RTP/UDP in your pasted session: SETUP rtsp://IP_ADDR:5555/test.sdp/trackID=1 RTSP/1.0 Transport: RTP/AVP/TCP;unicast;interleaved=0-1 This attempts to setup up an RTP over RTSP/TCP session. Since VLC does not support this transport it responds with a 461. This coincides with what I remember, namely that VLC has not implemented ...


0

I must use different struct (Local and To) for each socket? No, you can reuse the same Local (after changing sin_port) for the bind of the two other sockets. You can reuse the same To if you change sin_port each time you need it for another socket.


1

The browsers don't support it due to security constraints. You should take a look at WebRTC see also How to send a UDP Packet with Web RTC - Javascript? Can I use WebRTC to open a UDP connection?


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There is a WebRTC module for node.js: https://js-platform.github.io/node-webrtc/ The installation can be really cumbersome (to say the least) but if you succeed you'll be able to make your node.js server act as a WebRTC peer just as browsers do. This way you'd be able to open a Data Channel between a browser and your node.js server. We have this in use in ...


0

Here's what I'll do: Remember the timestamp of the first UDP packet ever to arrive: incomingTimestamp[0] Log timestampAfterProcessing[packetNo] - incomingTimestamp[0] (In contrast, my original attempt as stated in the question was timestampAfterProcessing[packetNo] - incomingTimestamp[packetNo]) The logged numbers should be independent of whatever ...


0

@Override public void messageReceived(IoSession session, Object message) throws Exception { for (int i = 0; i < session.getService().getManagedSessions().values().toArray().length; i++) { IoSession aSession=(IoSession) session.getService().getManagedSessions().values().toArray()[i]; aSession.write("Any ...



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