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32

There is a SendTimeout and a ReceiveTimeout property that you can use in the Socket of the UdpClient. Here is an example of a 5 second timeout: var udpClient = new UdpClient(); udpClient.Client.SendTimeout = 5000; udpClient.Client.ReceiveTimeout = 5000; ...


17

You have to set the socket option before binding. static void Main(string[] args) { IPEndPoint localpt = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, 6000); UdpClient udpServer = new UdpClient(); udpServer.Client.SetSocketOption( SocketOptionLevel.Socket, SocketOptionName.ReuseAddress, true); ...


15

Try this code : //Client uses as receive udp client UdpClient Client = new Client(Port); try { Client.BeginReceive(new AsyncCallback(recv), null); } catch(Exception e) { MessageBox.Show(e.ToString()); } //CallBack private void recv(IAsyncResult res) { IPEndPoint RemoteIpEndPoint = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, 8000); byte[] received = ...


12

What Filip is referring to is nested within the socket that UdpClient contains (UdpClient.Client.ReceiveTimeout). You can also use the async methods to do this, but manually block execution: var timeToWait = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10); var udpClient = new UdpClient( portNumber ); var asyncResult = udpClient.BeginReceive( null, null ); ...


12

The MTU is the maximum size of an IP packet that can be transmitted without fragmentation. IPv4 mandates a path MTU of at least 576 bytes, IPv6 of at least 1280 bytes. Ethernet has an MTU of 1500 bytes. An IP packet is composed of two parts: the packet header and the payload. The size of an IPv4 header is at least 20 bytes, the size of an IPv6 header at ...


9

This is actually trickier that it sounds because if you have more than one interface the broadcasts will not always go out all of the interfaces. To get around this I created this class. public class MyUdpClient : UdpClient { public MyUdpClient() : base() { //Calls the protected Client property belonging to the UdpClient base class. Socket ...


9

UdpClient is a wrapper around the Socket class which exposes the endpoint it's bound to through the LocalEndPoint property. Since you're using an UDP/IP client it's an IPEndPoint which has the desired Port property: int port = ((IPEndPoint)socket.Client.LocalEndPoint).Port;


9

Chances are your're sending something to a server who does not listen on that particular port. That would cause an icmp message to be sent back , and your next recvfrom will return an error in the case where you connect the socket. Check with tcpdump or wireshark what's going on on the wire.


9

Documentation in Eclipse: Receives a packet from this socket and stores it in the argument pack. All fields of pack must be set according to the data received. If the received data is longer than the packet buffer size it is truncated. This method blocks until a packet is received or a timeout has expired. The "s.receive(p);" command blocks the ...


8

RECEIVE on any port? That's insane. You would be flooded with messages from other applications (try TcpView for an idea of how many messages get passed on your system per second!) You must specify a port! Port is sort of like an identifier -- this packet is meant for THIS program (identified by port #) Send on any port is sensible, as it asks the system ...


8

That's not possible with UDP. If you need a reliable connection you should use TCP.


7

You're seeing an empty checksum because Windows is performing hardware offloading of the checksum calculation. It will be performed by the network interface card's (NIC) processor. Capturing a packet using a packet sniffer will show the packet before it has been processed by your NIC. You can turn off offloading from the device's properties page under Device ...


6

No. The cast has to be known at compile-time, but the actual type is only known at execution time. Note, however, that there's a better way of testing the type calling GetType. Instead of: if (x.GetType() == typeof(byte)) Use: if (x is byte) EDIT: To answer the extra questions: "What are all the types?" Well, look down the docs for BinaryWriter, I ...


5

You probably want to setup two UdpClients: one for listening, one for sending. For the receiving UdpClient, use the constructor that takes a port.


5

WebSocket is the protocol. See the Internet-Draft. And it's not using UDP.


5

Try specifying the endpoint when you create the UdpClient: UdpClient client = new UdpClient(localEndpoint); EDIT: Note that you can also specify just the port number: UdpClient client = new UdpClient(localPort); That may be somewhat simpler :)


5

Here are the answer to my questions. UdpClient udpClient = new UdpClient(0)); Console.WriteLine("UDP port : " + ((IPEndPoint)udpClient.Client.LocalEndPoint).Port.ToString()); 0 as the constructor parameter set the app to automatically find free udp port. ((IPEndPoint)udpClient.Client.LocalEndPoint)).Port.ToString() is used to find the port number.


5

You can do this to check if its disposed. Client is set to null when the UdpClient is disposed. private void OnUdpData(IAsyncResult result) { if (_udpReceive.Client == null) return; byte[] data = _udpReceive.EndReceive(result, ref _receiveEndPoint); //Snip doing stuff with data if (_udpReceive.Client == null) return; ...


5

In a short answer, UDP is not reliable. The very definition of UDP is that there is no way of telling, let alone assuring, whether a packet will reach its destination. If these messages are as important as you lead on, I recommend using TCP instead. This way, transmission errors and failures are automatically handled for you and you can be assured the ...


5

In your example, when a client connects, the anyIP IPEndPoint object will contain the address and port of the client connection.


5

Socket is a TCP socket. Broadcasting is not possible with TCP. If you want to use TCP, you cannot broadcast, you must have a connection open to each client and send the data over each connection separately. DatagramSocket is a UDP socket. Broadcasting is possible with UDP. However, the caveat is that UDP does not guarantee that your message will actually ...


4

I'm not familiar with the new DatagramSocket class, but usually binding to 127.0.0.1 means that you will only receive messages sent to the loopback adapter. Since your packets are coming from another host, they should be received on a NIC, not the loopback adapter. Edit: From looking at the documentation for the DatagramSocket API that you're using, you can ...


4

As I told you in comments to your previous question: You have to use a TIdBytes for that as well. Use SetLength() to pre-allocate it to the desired size, then call ReceiveBuffer() with it, and then you can copy out data from it as needed, either directly or with BytesToRaw(). For example: private myBuf: TIdBytes; ... while not Terminated do begin ...


4

UDP itself is unreliable. You can write your own code to make it reliable for your needs, however it's up to you to do that. If you want a reliable stream, use TCP. Sending a UDP packet twice may reduce problems with packet loss, however you have no guarantee. I suggest you implement some acknowledgement system where the clients send a packet back to the ...


4

Looks like a driver issue. Try turning off checksum offload in the driver properties. Alternatively, if you are running wireshark on the same machine, it may be that checksum offload is working correctly and Wireshark is not reporting the checksum because it is being calculated after Wireshark sees the packet. To confirm run wireshark on a separate box to ...


4

It's best to use TCP as it can detect data-corruption in your transmission and request the corrupted packets again. The detection happens by checking packets against a 16-bit checksum, this will only detect errors, but not allow the system to correct it, which is where requesting the data again comes in. It's probably most convenient to use the Indy socket ...


4

Your best idea would be to identify specific ports you would like to listen to, and start listening on those. Depending on what is done with received datagrams, it might be best/simplest to create a new Thread for each port you are listening on, and process it there, or enqueue it on a synchonrised (with lock) queue or list, for processing on a central ...


4

I see a few errors/problems: You never seem to set n to be the length of the file There is no memory allocation to hold the file Reading a file one byte at a time will be very inefficent After loading the file you should know the length of the file, no need to use strlen() If the file is binary, strlen() will fail since it will stop at the first embedded ...


4

It is common for clients to implement reliability on top of UDP if they need reliability (or sometimes just some reliability) but not any of the other things that TCP offers, for example strict in-order delivery, and if they want, at the same time, low latency (or multicast, where it works). In general, you will only want to use reliable UDP if there are ...


4

As the docs say, UdpClient/TcpClient are a thin wrapper on top of Socket class. If all you want to do is send/receive blobs of data, then these classes are good. For this scenario, there is no difference in performance between Socket and UdpClient/TcpClient. However, Socket does provide a faster way to do IO, in the form of XXXAsync() methods. These ...



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