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3

My psychic powers tell me you're "bringing it up" by changing the view's frame. You need to modify the constraint constant, or anytime something causes the view to invalidate its layout (such as changing the image, most likely) the layout engine will re-apply the constraints.


2

What if you used the value field to pass in the destination? [attributedString addAttribute:NSLinkAttributeName value:[@"destinationController1" stringByAppendingString:username] range:range]; Then override the delegate method: - (BOOL)textView:(UITextView *)textView shouldInteractWithURL:(NSURL *)URL ...


2

You don't need subclassing at all to do this. Objective-C has a wonderful feature, that allows you to add behavior to existing classes: categories. You can add a method in a category on UIView (let's call it RoundedCorners): @implementation UIView (RoundedCorners) - (void)ps_addRoundedCorners; @end @implementation UIView (RoundedCorners) - ...


1

The only example I have for you is an OS X NSButton subclass, but the change to a UIButton shouldn't be difficult. Note that the drawRect code is just like you'd do it in an NSView (or UIView). From the picture you posted, I think you actually already know how to do this. The code: import Foundation import AppKit class WispSquareButton : NSButton { ...


1

I solved the above puzzle by calculating the remaining size where the first string can be accommodated. Used a NSString category to truncate with ellipsis. Size of First String = Size of Button - Size of Second String // Min length to be displayed is flexible based on space occupied by second string // Input length ranges from 9 to 20+ characters. ...


1

Since you already have tagged your button, in the target, you can use the sender to identify the button again, e.g. -(void) onButtonPressed:(id)sender { UIButton *button = (UIButton *)sender; NSLog(@"%d", [button tag]); }


1

You have probably got your animation queues all messed around, causing the button's frame to animate. Without seeing your entire source tree, it's tough to say where exactly you have incorrectly managed your animations, but you could use this trickery if you really wanted to: [CATransaction begin]; [CATransaction setDisableActions:YES]; [go ...


1

Try the following: someButton.isAccessibilityElement = NO; This tells the button that it isn't an accessible element. This should prevent voice-over from stopping at the button.


1

You need to update textFieldEditing: to trim whitespace and see if the resulting string has any length: - (IBAction)textFieldEditing:(UITextField *)textField { NSString *trimmedString = [textField.text stringByTrimmingCharactersInSet:[NSCharacterSet whitespaceAndNewlineCharacterSet]]; _saveButton.enabled = trimmedString.length > 0; } This code ...


1

I did a lot of search, and find out that: self.ProjectTableView.delaysContentTouches = NO; is the key to solve my issue. Seems like touch events are delayed in the UITableView, so If set this to NO, it will respond like normal buttons.


1

Add a UIGestureRecognizer to your UIViewController by calling setupTapGesture in viewDidLoad - (void)setupTapGesture { UITapGestureRecognizer *tapGesture = [[UITapGestureRecognizer alloc] initWithTarget:self action:@selector(toggleVisibility)]; tapGesture.delegate = self; [self.view addGestureRecognizer:tapGesture]; } And then use this ...


1

What you can do is drag a View (not an ImageView) on your storyboard first. After that you drag the ImageView into the View as well as the label. Now you can use align and pin to put the ImageView and the Label at the right position within the View.



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