Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

@Banning's answer will work, but it's possible to do this in a more Swifty way. Instead of using NSSet and down casting, you can build this from the ground up using a Set with a generic type UIUserNotificationCategory. let categories = Set<UIUserNotificationCategory>(arrayLiteral: restartGameCategory) let settings = ...


5

Create your UILocalNotification instance and call that method on UIAplication instance -presentLocalNotificationNow: [[UIApplication sharedApplication]presentLocalNotificationNow:notification] In SWIFT: UIApplication.sharedApplication().presentLocalNotificationNow(notification)


4

Sort of... they persists after unistall of the app probably for some hours, but they are not fired. You can test by yourself, launch your app in debug schedule some notifications, delete the app, install the app again and ask UIApplication for its scheduled notifications. You should see them again. I think that Apple created this pattern to avoid accidental ...


3

Instead of using (NSSet(array: [restartGameCategory])) as Set<NSObject>) with (NSSet(array: [restartGameCategory])) as? Set<UIUserNotificationCategory>) like so: application.registerUserNotificationSettings(UIUserNotificationSettings(forTypes: [.Alert, .Badge, .Sound], categories: (NSSet(array: [restartGameCategory])) as? ...


2

You can schedule up to 64 local notifications. There is no limit on the time period; you can schedule them years in advance if you like. That said, if you need some mechanism to schedule new notifications, even if the app is not running at all (e.g. because the user terminated it), you need a background mode for that. Fetch is probably the way to go here, ...


2

The problem is that isTimer is true, so you are using the same date over and over; your date variable is different each time thru the loop, but it is never used.


2

UILocalNotifications are scheduled by iOS itself (the actual operation system), i.e. once your app schedules the notification, it sits in the OS and waits to fire (or to be cancelled). This is why deleting the app doesn't help anything. The notification doesn't sit in the app, but in the system. You can solve this issue by calling once in your AppDelegate ...


2

You can handle the notification yourself and show a custom alert. Apps such as Viber, Whatsapp, and BisPhone use this approach. One example of a 3rd party custom alert is CRToast. Try scheduling a local notification while your app is in the foreground, and you will see that no stock iOS alert is shown: if (application.applicationState == ...


1

Apple is very specific about what can be run in the background as it doesn't want apps to drain battery unnecessarily. I don't know what your requirements are exactly but these are about your only options for background handling. Push notifications Background processing If the prayer times are common for everyone you could set up a server to pull them ...


1

Swift Version, if need: func cancelLocalNotification(UNIQUE_ID: String){ var notifyCancel = UILocalNotification() var notifyArray = UIApplication.sharedApplication().scheduledLocalNotifications for notifyCancel in notifyArray as! [UILocalNotification]{ let info: [String: String] = notifyCancel.userInfo as! [String: ...


1

The problem has nothing to do with the display of local notifications. As you said in your question, you use remote notifications to TRIGGER opening your app and then run code to conditionally show a local notification. The reason why this is not working is: Your code to show a local notification is NOT run from remote notifications after the user has ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible