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208

That's an easy one: [aView convertPoint:localPosition toView:nil]; ... converts a point in local coordinate space to window coordinates. You can use this method to calculate a view's origin in window space like this: [aView.superview convertPoint:aView.frame.origin toView:nil]; 2014 Edit: Looking at the popularity of Matt__C's comment it seems ...


110

You can read about some of the possible causes here: Technical Q&A QA1688 - Why won't my UIViewController rotate with the device? In your situation its probably the fact that you are adding the view as another subview to the window. Only the first subview gets the rotation events. What you can do is add it as a subview of the first window subview. ...


88

Whenever I want to display some overlay on top of everything else, I just add it on top of the Application Window directly: [[[UIApplication sharedApplication] keyWindow] addSubview:someView]


80

The problem Beginning with iOS 6, only the topmost view controller (alongside the UIApplication object) participates in deciding whether to rotate in response to a change of the device's orientation. https://developer.apple.com/library/ios/qa/qa1688/_index.html The solution I have open sourced a pod named AGWindowView. It will automatically deal ...


72

Starting with Rob's answer I played around a bit and would like to write down some notes for others trying to get information on this topic: It is not a problem at all to add another UIWindow. Just create one and makeKeyAndVisible. Done. Remove it by making another window visible, then release the one you don't need anymore. The window that is "key" ...


46

In webViewDidFinishLoad delegate I run a javascript on the loaded html page that disable the long touch. [webView stringByEvaluatingJavaScriptFromString:@"document.body.style.webkitTouchCallout='none'; document.body.style.KhtmlUserSelect='none'"];


43

UIWindow in a Storyboard project can be subclassed as explained in Apple's UIApplicationDelegate reference: window When a storyboard is being used, the application must present the storyboard by adding it to a window and putting that window on-screen. The application queries this property for the window. The retained reference to the window by ...


37

You need to roll your own for UIWindow. Listen for UIApplicationDidChangeStatusBarFrameNotification notifications, and then set the the transform when the status bar changes. You can read the current orientation from -[UIApplication statusBarOrientation], and calculate the transform like this: #define DegreesToRadians(degrees) (degrees * M_PI / 180) - ...


35

The UIWindow's coordinate system is always in portrait orientation. It applies the rotation by setting its rootViewController's view's transform. For example, I created a test app using the single-view template and ran it. In portrait orientation: (gdb) po [[(id)UIApp keyWindow] recursiveDescription] <UIWindow: 0x9626a90; frame = (0 0; 768 1024); ...


32

There are two parts of the problem: Top window, top view on top window. All the existing answers missed the top window part. But [[UIApplication sharedApplication] keyWindow] is not guaranteed to be the top window. Top window. It is very unlikely that there will be two windows with the same windowLevel coexist for an app, so we can sort all the windows by ...


31

Use can use the UIView method covertRect:toView to convert to the new co-ordinate space. I did something very similar: // Convert the co-ordinates of the view into the window co-ordinate space CGRect newFrame = [self convertRect:self.bounds toView:nil]; // Add this view to the main window [self.window addSubview:self]; self.frame = newFrame; In my ...


31

If your main window is an outlet of your AppDelegate (which should be the case), you may simply use MyAppDelegate* myDelegate = (((MyAppDelegate*) [UIApplication sharedApplication].delegate)); [myDelegate.window ...]


30

Before the rootViewController property came along, most apps had code like this in the application delegate: [window addSubview:viewController.view]; [window makeKeyAndVisible]; This code set the view controller's view as the main view, but the UIWindow instance had no reference to the controller owning that view. When you use the rootViewController ...


26

It sounds like your not converting between the proper views. A view's frame is set to the coordinates of it's superview, not its own internal coordinates, so if you were trying to convert the origin of a view to window coordinates, you would need to use the superview: [[self superview] convertPoint:self.frame.origin toView:theWindow]; However, it is even ...


25

Usually that will give you the top view, but there's no guarantee that it's visible to the user. It could be off the screen, have an alpha of 0.0, or could be have size of 0x0 for example. It could also be that the keyWindow has no subviews, so you should probably test for that first. This would be unusual, but it's not impossible. UIWindow is a subclass ...


24

The correct way to hide a window is to set the hidden property to YES. To remove it from UIApplication's windows property you just release the window (in ARC you set all references to nil). Of course you would want to have another window in place at this time.


21

If you're in ARC code your window is getting deallocated immediately after showOtherWindow: returns. Try assigning otherWindow to an ivar in a persistent object.


21

The key window is the window which will receive user interaction. You might take a look at this: http://developer.apple.com/mac/library/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/WinPanel/Concepts/ChangingMainKeyWindow.html


21

When using storyboards the application delegate and main window are no longer represented in Interface Builder. Instead, when your app starts, your app delegate is queried for a property called 'window'. If this returns nil then a default window of type UIWindow is created for you. To change this behaviour you need to implement a 'window' getter method in ...


19

Easiest way is to get the window from the app delegate instead: UIWindow *keyWindow = [[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate] window]; // Do something with the window now


18

Yes, adding it to the UIWindow would be extremely hacky and finicky. Storyboards If you're using Storyboards and iOS 5.0 onwards, you should be able to use container views and do something like this: Here's another picture showing the, rather simplistic, structure of the first View Controller: The view controller on the left has a container, and then ...


18

UIWindow *window1 = [[UIWindow alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0, 0, 320, 320)]; window1.backgroundColor = [UIColor redColor]; window1.windowLevel = UIWindowLevelAlert; [window1 makeKeyAndVisible]; Finally I know why it doesn't work, because window1 is a method var, and it will lost after the method executed. So I declare a new @property for it, as ...


17

I think the "Launching in Landscape Mode" of the iOS Application Programming Guide mostly explains what is happening with your test application: Applications in iOS normally launch in portrait mode to match the orientation of the Home screen. If you have an application that runs in both portrait and landscape mode, your application should ...


15

Your application's key window isn't set until [window makeKeyAndVisible] gets called in your app delegate. Your UIViewController is probably being loaded from a NIB before this call. This explains why keyWindow is returning nil. Luckily, your view controller doesn't need to go through UIApplication to get the window. You can just do: UIWindow *mWindow = ...


14

A UIWindow can float above other UI elements like the system keyboard. To address your last paragraph: Make a UIWindow with the same frame as your main window. Set its windowLevel property to UIWindowLevelStatusBar. Set its hidden property to NO.


14

Additional to B H answer. Also look this answer. Got this issue when launching my landscape only app from portrait orientation (also the app shouldn't be presented in recently opened apps list, which can be seen by pressing Home button twice. Perhaps, iOS somehow caches the orientation and window size). My code was self.window = [[UIWindow alloc] ...


13

When you run landscape app from portrait mode UIScreen has portrait bounds in iOS 8 (only if you haven't this app in app switch panel, as iOS 8 makes some cache). Even displaying window with makeKeyAndVisible doesn't change it's frame. But it changes [UIScreen mainScreen].bounds according to AppViewController avaliable orientation. #import "AppDelegate.h" ...


13

Ok, here's what I did: I created two views in the front window. The first view covered the area where I wanted to catch the touches; the second, where I wanted the touches to pass through. I sub-classed UIWindow and overrode the hitTest:withEvent method like so: - (UIView *) hitTest:(CGPoint)point withEvent:(UIEvent *)event { // See if the hit is ...


12

The best solution I've found is to create a transparent container view, add that container to the window, and place your alert inside the container. You may then register for UIApplicationWillChangeStatusBarOrientationNotification to receive rotation events and transform the container; this allows you to independently manipulate the frame of the alert: - ...


12

The UIApplicationDelegate usually has a reference to the "main window": [[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate] window]; Furthermore, UIApplication has an array of windows [[UIApplication sharedApplication] windows]. See the UIApplication Class Reference.



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