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60

Both Debian and Ubuntu ship with pam_umask. This allows you to configure umask in /etc/login.defs and have them apply system-wide, regardless of how a user logs in. To enable it, you may need to add a line to /etc/pam.d/common-session reading session optional pam_umask.so or it may already be enabled. Then edit /etc/login.defs and change the UMASK line ...


49

To get the right ownership, you can set the group setuid bit on the directory with chmod g+rwxs dirname This will ensure that files created in the directory are owned by the group. You should then make sure everyone runs with umask 002 or 007 or something of that nature---this is why Debian and many other linux systems are configured with per-user ...


36

Here's how to do it using default ACLs, at least under Linux. First, you might need to enable ACL support on your filesystem. If you are using ext4 then it is already enabled. Other filesystems (e.g., ext3) need to be mounted with the acl option. In that case, add the option to your /etc/fstab. For example, if the directory is located on your root ...


19

The umask settings in Gitolite are there for changing the umask for newly created repos (and not about the files managed in versions by those repos). See gitolite.rc doc: $REPO_UMASK, octal, default 0077 The default UMASK that gitolite uses makes all the repos and their contents have rwx------ permissions. People who want to run gitweb realise that ...


11

There is no real inconsistency, as the relation between umask and chmod can purely be written down with equations. Apparently, umask sets the opposite of chmod, it was created like this back in the old days. Example: 022 (the default usual umask) creates 755. It works like this: 7 - 0 = 7 becomes the first byte 7 - 2 = 5 becomes the second and third bytes ...


7

From the GNU C Library manual: Here is an example showing how to read the mask with umask without changing it permanently: mode_t read_umask (void) { mode_t mask = umask (0); umask (mask); return mask; } However, it is better to use getumask if you just want to read the mask value, because it is reentrant (at least if you use the GNU ...


7

It looks as if you've been reading books, or maybe reading some code, and found that they recommend setting the umask value to 0. I've never been entirely convinced that it is the best choice, but it is simple. The issues are: What happens when the daemon creates a file (or directory)? What was the value of umask when the daemon was started? The answer ...


7

There is no difference between umask 0022 and umask 022. The octal umasks are calculated via the bitwise AND of the unary complement of the argument using bitwise NOT. Set the umask like this: el@apollo:~$ umask 0077 el@apollo:~$ umask 0077 el@apollo:~$ umask 0022 el@apollo:~$ umask 0022 Brief summary of umask value meanings: umask 077 - Assigns ...


7

Another solution is to create a directory with the desired permissions, and then create the socket inside it (example code without any regard for error checking and buffer overflows): // Create a directory with the proper permissions mkdir(path, 077); // Append the name of the socket strcat(path, "/socket_name"); // Create the socket normally sockaddr_un ...


6

If you set the umask(2) to 0 before starting the JVM, all files and directories created will be created with full permissions for everyone. This is probably a bad idea. You can use the File.setReadable(), File.setWritable APIs to fiddle with the mode bits after the file has been created. That's often good enough, if you're granting permissions; if you're ...


6

In order to create a file within the document root, your PHP process must have permissions to write to the directory. Usually (but not always) PHP runs as the same user that the web server runs as. The name of this user will vary with different systems. On Ubuntu and Debian, the user is called www-data, on other systems it may be just www, or apache, or ...


6

You seem to be misunderstanding what umask is used for. It sets/retrieves the process's file mode creation mask, which in turn is used to turn off bits in the file mode you specify in calls like mkdir, like this (pseduo-code): real_mode = requested_mode & ~umask So in your code, since you pass in the value of the umask itself, you end up specifying ...


6

You'll probably need to show us the code that constitutes: [do some other code here that creates a file] The code you have works fine on my system: import os oldmask = os.umask (022) fh1 = os.open ("qq1.junk", os.O_CREAT, 0777) fh2 = os.open ("qq2.junk", os.O_CREAT, 0022) os.umask (oldmask) os.close (fh1) os.close (fh2) producing files as follows: ...


6

Not a solution for generically tracing where umask settings are coming from on ubuntu (the only way I've found so far is the good old hard work approach of replicating the issue, attempting to isolate it to a script or a function, then stepping back through each script/function that is called recursively) but a solution to the php5-fpm umask issue. I've ...


5

Interesting requirement. Currently (at least in bash), umask is a global setting and you cannot set it based on object type. One solution that comes to mind would be to set the umask to the file variant and then intercept calls to mkdir (such as with a user-created mkdir script earlier in the path) to do: umask 0701 ; /path/to/real/mkdir $1 ; umask 0604 ...


4

It's ugly, but you can use the setfacl command to achieve exactly what you want. On a Solaris machine, I have a file that contains the acls for users and groups. Unfortunately, you have to list all of the users (at least I couldn't find a way to make this work otherwise): user::rwx user:user_a:rwx user:user_b:rwx ... group::rwx mask:rwx other:r-x ...


4

I solved my own problems. For the sudo permissions, I executed sudo visudo and added the line Defaults umask = 0002 to the end. For the Apache user, I added the line umask 0002 to the end of the /etc/apache2/envvars (I couldn't find any better solution).


4

It already works like you want it. Just use "0666" and the umask will be applied. f, err := os.OpenFile(fpath, os.O_CREATE|os.O_WRONLY, 0666) For me with umask 0022 I get: $ go run x.go ; ls -l filename -rw-r--r-- 1 ask wheel 0 May 24 00:18 filename Use 0660 (for example) if you always want the file to be unreadable by "other", no matter the ...


3

Java SE 7 has java.nio.file.attribute.PosixFileAttributes which probably does something.


3

The umask is an attribute of the process not of a file - that is part of UNIX architecture and is nothing todo with Bash, or any other shell program. The real issue is that the programs you are using do not allow the permissions to be changed on creation. In C, for example, mkdir has a second parameter, the mode. You don't need to write C though, Python ...


3

Being picky/careful, and Python 3k-compatible, here is my slightly different answer (that still doesn't explain what the OP's original issue was): old_umask = os.umask(0o022) # u=rwx,g=rx,o=rx try: # do stuff finally: os.umask(old_umask)


3

Quick answer is this shell function to be put in your ~/.profile. An explanation follows. git(){(umask 0022; command git "$@")} A umask is property of a process. It is inherited from the parent process and can be changed from inside later. The command to change umask is usually named umask too. Git has no configuration option for setting its umask, it ...


3

You can use the command umask (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umask) http://askubuntu.com/questions/44542/what-is-umask-and-how-does-it-work If you want to change the umask value for some specific folders only, have a look there : http://askubuntu.com/questions/44534/how-to-set-umask-for-a-specific-folder ...


3

First, make sure that the pam-modules package is installed. That makes the pam_umask module available. Then make sure that /etc/pam.d/common-session has a line of the form session optional pam_umask.so so that pam_umask is enabled. Now, according to the pam_umask man page, the default umask is determined at login by checking each of the following places, ...


2

You need to supply 2 arguments to fopen. Try changing fopen($file_to_make) or die('could not open/create file'); to fopen($file_to_make,'w') or die('could not open/create file');


2

3 methods are available: setReadalble(boolean boolean) setWritable(boolean,boolean) setExecutable(boolean,boolean) This will set the file to "0777" String path = "SOME/PATH"; final File file = new File(path); file.setReadable(true, false); file.setExecutable(true, false); file.setWritable(true, false);


2

The umask is applied to all modes used in file system operations. From the manual open(2): The permissions of the created file are (mode & ~umask) So with a single call to umask, you can influence the mode of all create files. This is usually used when a program wants the user to allow to overrule the default grants for files/directories it ...


2

From the man page The umask setting also affects the permissions assigned to POSIX IPC objects (mq_open(3), sem_open(3), shm_open(3)), FIFOs (mkfifo(3)), and UNIX domain sockets (unix(7)) created by the process. The umask does not affect the permissions assigned to System V IPC objects created by the process using msgget(2), semget(2), shmget(2)). So ...


2

If you're able to install the SSH2 PHP Module Wordpress will then give you the option to upgrade over SFTP. In Ubuntu: sudo apt-get install libssh2-php In CentOS (EPEL required): sudo yum install php-pecl-ssh2



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