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16

First, include the header: #include <sys/utsname.h> Then, define a utsname structure: struct utsname unameData; Then, call uname() with a pointer to the struct: uname(&unameData); // Might check return value here (non-0 = failure) After this, the struct will contain the info you want: printf("%s", unameData.sysname); ...


11

Rather than single quotes, you probably meant to use backticks: OS=`uname -s` but you really want OS=$(uname -s) Also, rather than an if statment, which will eventually become an if/else series, you might consider using case: case $( uname -s ) in Linux) echo Linux;; *) echo other;; esac


8

It's important to know that no non-Windows OS string is going to contain the text "win", and no non-OSX OS string is going to contain the word "darwin", and so on. Detecting the OS is easy. $uname = strtolower(php_uname()); if (strpos($uname, "darwin") !== false) { // It's OSX } else if (strpos($uname, "win") !== false) { // It's windows } else if ...


8

From the documentation, it looks like you'd use it like so: struct utsname my_uname; if(uname(&my_uname) == -1) printf("uname call failed!"); else printf("System name: %s\nNodename:%s\nRelease:%s\nVersion:%s\nMachine:%s\n", my_uname.sysname, my_uname.nodename, my_uname.release,my_uname.version,my_uname.machine);


7

netstat -pl | grep NAME_OR_PID


7

In order, the fields are: "Linux": The machine's kernel name (e.g, OS). "mymachine": The machine's node name (e.g, hostname). "2.6.18-194.e15PAE": The kernel version "#1 SMP Fri Apr 2 15:37:44 EDT 2010": The kernel version and build time. "i686 i686": The processor type and hardware platform. "i386": The architecture of the processor. (This and the two ...


7

If the distribution follows the Linux Standard Base, you could read the output of lsb_release -i. Something like this: import os try: distro = os.popen('lsb_release -i').read().split(':')[1].strip() except IndexError: distro = None


6

You forgot a space after the square brackets. The first line has to look like this: if [ `uname` == "Linux" ]; then In your version, without the spaces, the [ and the output of uname is concatenated into one executable named [Linux, which does not exist in the PATH.


6

From the comments at the top: I need to know if the OS is (Open)SUSE so as to use the correct package installer (zypper). If it is DEBIAN (For Example), I will use apt-get... I suggest you directly solve the actual problem. Instead of identifying the OS, identify the package manager available. import os def file_exists(fname): try: ...


6

The uname() function takes a pointer to the utsname structure that will store the result as input. Therefore, just make a temporary utsname instance, pass the address of it to uname, and read the content of this struct after the function succeed. struct utsname retval; if(uname(&retval) < 0) { // <---- perror("Failed to uname"); // error ...


5

Seems like this is the browscap for uname. Feel free to edit/update this list: Ubuntu 10.10 32bit (i686) Linux SYSTEM_NAME 2.6.35-22-generic #34-Ubuntu SMP SYSTEM_DATE i686 Ubuntu 10.04 32bit, PHP 5.3.2 Linux SYSTEM_NAME 2.6.32-25-generic #44-Ubuntu SMP SySTEM_DATE i686 Ubuntu 10.04 x64 Linux SYSTEM_NAME 2.6.32-25-generic #44-Ubuntu SMP ...


5

On Windows, POSIX::uname obtains its information from GetVersionEx whose parameter's documentation contains a table. The Win32 module provides more user-friendly calls. >perl -MWin32 -E"say Win32::GetOSDisplayName()" Windows 7 Professional (64-bit) Service Pack 1


5

TL;DR Uname and Utsname are not available for OSX. The reason is because those functions are not defined for the operating system. Reading the documentation for syscall this jumped at me: The details vary depending on the underlying system, and by default, godoc will display the syscall documentation for the current system. If you want godoc to ...


5

A fully working example is worth a thousand words. ;-) #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> #include <errno.h> #include <sys/utsname.h> int main(void) { struct utsname buffer; errno = 0; if (uname(&buffer) != 0) { perror("uname"); exit(EXIT_FAILURE); } printf("system name = %s\n", buffer.sysname); ...


5

assuming you want everything before the second dot, this will do what you want: uname -r | cut -d. -f1-2 uname itself does not support cutting the output, afaik. The pipe through cut will show you fields 1 and 2 (-f1-2), delimited by dots (-d.)


3

uname -r | sed 's/\([0-9]\+\.[0-9]\+\)\..*/\1/'


3

I just did this: <?php $tstart = microtime(true); php_uname('a'); print 'it took '. sprintf("%f",microtime(true) - $tstart) ." seconds\n"; ?> And it produced this: it took 0.000016 seconds That is on a Core2Duo 2.4GHz Debian box. I know it is an empirical test and all but I think that it shows that it will be fast enough for you. I did ...


3

uname -m is used to report the personality(2) of the 'virtual machine' running the code. Because the kernel can run code with different personalities (say, 32-bit code on a 64-bit machine, complete with 'only' a 32-bit address space, or short inodes, different signal numbers, or similar constraints), programs might use the output of uname -m to determine how ...


3

Docker uses the host OS kernel, there is no custom or additional kernel inside container. All containers runs on machine are sharing this "host" kernel. See for more information this question on SuperUser.


3

You can use the platform module to get distribution and processor information: import platform def is_linux(distro, architecture): if not platform.system() == 'Linux': return False if platform.linux_distribution()[0].lower() != distro: return False return platform.processor() == architecture def is_64bit_ubuntu(): return ...


3

Bash in finicky about spacing. You need spaces in your conditional if [ `uname` == "Linux" ]; then echo "It worked" else echo "It didn't work" fi


2

You could interpolate the result of uname -r into the directory (guessing here): /lib/modules/`uname -r`/extra/


2

According to this uname man page, The structure contains arrays of implementation-defined size, not char* (c_char_p). Have you looked at the structure definition in sys/utsname.h? You have to match the exact structure definition. The data type should probably be c_char * n where n is the size of the array from that field found in sys/utsname.h. ...


2

The fields in a utsname structure are not pointers; they are "arrays of unspecified size". So the strings are packed back-to-back in the structure and null-terminated. I do not know how to represent this in Python. But I would suggest starting with something other than uname() for your experiments. :-) [update] 517366245708 decimal is 0x78756E694C, ...


2

The variable CONFIG_LOCALVERSION (inside your kernel .config file) let you set a custom string that will be appended to the kernel release number, thus shown when using 'uname'. Is that what you want?


2

cat /etc/issue shows you the name of the OS installed. Thanks & Regards, Alok Thaker


2

Try to set KBUILD_BUILD_TIMESTAMP. Default is `date`, so it could be something like export KBUILD_BUILD_TIMESTAMP="r3 `date`" #1 at the beginning is from .version file, it's incremented after every configuration / build. See file scripts/mkcompile_h for more info.


2

At the top of the top-level Makefile, there are four lines VERSION = 3 PATCHLEVEL = 18 SUBLEVEL = 7 EXTRAVERSION = The values are different for different kernel versions, of course. These are used to construct the version string, so changing them before building the kernel changes the version string of the kernel you build. Additionally, there's a ...


2

I would use a case statement here: case $(uname -r) in (3.18.*) echo bravo;; esac If you want to check if the version is larger than some value or not, you might use something like: case $(uname -r) in (3.1[89].*|3.[2-9]*|[4-9]*) echo bravo;; (*) echo alpha;; esac


1

You could also accomplish this with parameter expansion: $ r="$(uname -r)" $ echo ${r%.*} 3.5 ${VAR%pat} non-greedily removes pat from the end of VAR. Note that pat is a glob pattern i.e. dot just means "dot" and star means "any-number-of-chars".



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