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18

@array = grep defined, @array;


17

use warnings FATAL => 'uninitialized'; use Carp (); $SIG{__DIE__} = \&Carp::confess; The first line makes the warning fatal. The next two cause a stack trace when your program dies.


15

Don't use global arrays. It's as simple as that. Lexical arrays are limited to the scope where they are declared, and automatically start empty when you enter the scope. If you must use globals, keeping track of them all in one place is a good idea anyway, so clearing them shouldn't be difficult. Someone once posted an now-infamous tool to perlmonks to ...


13

It's good that you're using strict and warnings. The purpose of warnings is to alert you when Perl sees behavior that's likely to be unintentional (and thus incorrect). When you're doing it deliberately, it's perfectly fine to disable the warning locally. undef is treated as 0 in numeric contexts. If you're okay with both having undefined values and having ...


13

Instead of the messy fiddling with %SIG proposed by everyone else, just use Carp::Always and be done. Note that you can inject modules into a script without source modifications simply by running it with perl -MCarp::Always; furthermore, you can set the PERL5OPT environment variable to -MCarp::Always to have it loaded without even changing the ...


12

As Chris J said, the null values are returned as undefined values. If you had warnings enabled, you would have received an "undefined value in print" warning when you printed the values. Using the strict and warnings pragmata can save a lot of time debugging. The diagnostics pragma adds additional explanatory text to the standard warnings and fatal ...


12

See ISO C99 6.10.3.5 paragraph 2. A preprocessing directive of the form # undef identifier new-line causes the specified identifier no longer to be defined as a macro name. It is ignored if the specified identifier is not currently defined as a macro name. Even Visual C++ 6 (which was notorious for bad standards compliance) allows this: ...


10

As the other answers says, C++ doesn't have this concept. You can easily work around it though. Either you can have an undefined value which you initialize bar to in the constructor, typically -1.0 or something similar. If you know that calculate_bar never returns negative values you can implement the undefined function as a check for < 0.0. A more ...


10

Since you are using qw, your code is equivalent to: @jobs = ("job1", "undef", "job2"); So $jobs[1] is the string "undef" which is not same as undef and hence the behavior. If you want the second job to be an undef you can do: @jobs = ("job1", undef, "job2"); AFAIK you cannot get this done using qw.


9

Wrap your code in a no warnings block. ... { no warnings; eval "\$value = $hash->{key}"; } ... You can also disable specific classes of warnings. See perllexwarn for the hierarchy of warning categories and perldiag for the category that any particular warning belongs to. { no warnings qw(uninitialized numeric); eval "\$value = ...


9

The fact that you want this screams "bad design" to me. However, on the assumption that you know exactly what you're doing with this radioactive chainsaw, you can accomplish it by accessing the global symbol table hash %:: or %main::. (The colons are part of the name.) This hash contains a mapping from every defined global symbol to a reference to its ...


9

I once saw a show with a scene in a law school class. The instructor presented two similar cases to his students and asked why did they result in different rulings. It's because the rulings were made by judges, and judges are people, he eventually explained. That should warn. The developers that work on Perl are people. Run perlbug to send a bug report if ...


8

#ifdef is a preprocessor directive, this means that it will be applied before your source code is compiled. It means that only the source code 'below' will be affected. If you run your source code through the preprocessor you'll be able to see the result. That will give you more insight in the workings of the preprocessor.


7

From http://metacpan.org/pod/DBI , it will return null values as 'undef'.


7

Reduced to a bare minimum, this prints "undef detected". #!/bin/perl -w use strict; sub getcmd { return undef; } my $ret; if (!($ret = getcmd())) { print "undef detected\n"; } else { print "undef undetected\n"; } Consequently, your problem is most likely that the $self->getcmd() isn't returning undef, even though you think it should.


7

main isn't a #define in the first place. Your #undef changes nothing at all. #define foo bar tells the preprocessor "replace all occurences of foo with bar". #undef foo tells the preprocessor "foo has no special meaning anymore, leave it as is" If you want a linker error, rename main to e.g. main2, or do e.g. this: void foo(); int main() { foo(); } ...


7

I've just played around a bit, and it seems that ()[0], in list context, is interpreted as an empty list rather than as an undef scalar. For example, this: my @arr = ()[0]; my $size = @arr; print "$size\n"; prints 0. So $_ => ()[0] is roughly equivalent to just $_. To fix it, you can use the scalar function to force scalar context: my %h = map {$_ ...


7

Use rename to delete a proc rename myproc "" Example: % proc myproc {} { puts "hello world" } % myproc hello world % rename myproc "" % myproc invalid command name "myproc" %


7

I'm sure it's not very expensive, but I have to say that my $var = shift // undef; is not nearly as clear as my $var = shift; # argument is optional or my $var = shift; # optional; undef if omitted Which are both definitely (although barely) cheaper at runtime. If you need the comment anyway (for clarity), then what does // undef really add ...


6

As others pointed out, there is nothing like an "undefined" state. But you may want to look into boost.optional


6

Not sure what you mean by concatenation here: use Data::Dumper; sub return_many { my $val = 'hmm'; my $otherval = 'zap'; #$otherval = undef; my @arr = ( 'a1', 'a2' ); return ( $val, $otherval, @arr ); } my ($val, $otherval, @arr) = return_many(); print Dumper([$val, $otherval, \@arr]); prints $VAR1 = [ 'hmm', ...


6

Kernighan and Ritchie (2nd edition) agree with you. EDIT: quote from the source (section A12.3): A control line of the form # undef identifier causes the identifier's preprocessor definition to be forgotten. If is not erroneous to apply #undef to an unknown identifier.


6

I'm sure it's an artifact of history. As mentioned in jdigital's answer, the 2nd edition of K&R says It is not erroneous to apply #undef to an unknown identifier. However, that sentence is not in the 1978 edition. I'm pretty sure pre-standard compilers would often throw an error if you tried to #undef an undefined macro. Also, the ANSI C ...


6

Here's our hint: ..... {{egs_patch_app,start,[normal,[]]}, {'EXIT', {undef, [{cowboy,start_listener, ..... The tuple {egs_patch_app,start,[normal,[]]} tells us that the error occurred in egs_patch_app:start/2. The atom EXIT is the tag of a notification message sent when a process has exited, or the result of an expression ...


5

You can turn off the “uninitialized” warning for a second: my $a; my $b = 1; { no warnings 'uninitialized'; my $c = $a+$b; # no warning } my $c = $a+$b; # warning Or you can short-circuit to zero: my $d = ($a||0)+$b; # no warning Doesn’t look very nice to me though.


5

The "commandsFile.def" file probably uses the "A_COMMANDS_MACRO" macro somewhere internally. Remember that "#include" essentially pastes the included file into the including one, so the #define is still in effect when "commandsFile.def" is processed.


5

I can only say that I've never had a use for it in 5 years. Perhaps more usefully, grepping through the entire source of rails shows only 7 instances and they're all meta-programming related. (undef_method has rather more instances at 22). It appears to be useful for testing the behaviour of classes with and without modules mixed-in. Hopefully someone can ...


5

Create an instance of an object that stores these variables. Reference this object, and when wanting to "reset", reinstantiate your object. e.g. public class SomeClass { public double jTime; ... } ... SomeClass sc = new SomeClass(); sc.jTime = 1; sc = new SomeClass();


4

The commandsFile.def should contain many lines: A_COMMANDS_MACRO(A_COMMAND, 10, na, na) A_COMMANDS_MACRO(OTHER_COMMAND, 23, na, na) So that the code would create an enum with available commands and their codes. It could be useful when this .def file is used by a program written in other language, so that instead of implementing text parsing, it uses C ...


4

my $a = $some_href->{$code}{'A'} || 0; my $b = $some_href->{$code}{'B'} || 0; my $total = $a + $b; In this case, it's OK to treat false values the same as undefined values because of your fallback value.



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