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2

The example you provided does not exhibit any immediate undefined behavior. According to the standard since the number of elements you are reserving is greater than the current capacity of the vector a reallocation will occur. Since the allocation occurs at the point where reserve is called the pointer returned by data() is itself valid. 23.3.6.3/2 ...


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Definitely NO: your pointer cannot assumed to be valid. Here the proof that it's UB: The standard says about capactity (23.3.6.3) that reserve() has the following effect: A directive that informs a vector of a planned change in size, so that it can manage the storage allocation accordingly. After reserve(), capacity() is greater or equal to the ...


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In most implementations of the STL, a reserve of an empty vector will trigger a reallocation and ensure that the data your are pointed it is owned/managed. The location of the data (the value of the pointer as returned by data()) might change when a vector is resized. Holding a pointer per se is of course legal, dereferencing it for a read while ...


3

To add to Jonathan's answer. The second program invokes undefined behavior and a compiler has the right to stop the translation as undefined behavior is not bounded (c11, 3.4.3p1). The first program may invoke undefined behavior but the compiler cannot stop the translation as not all execution paths produce undefined behavior. In Defect Report #109, C ...


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Can the compiler therefore reject the program and not generate an executable? Yes. The definition of undefined behaviour is: behavior for which this International Standard imposes no requirements [ Note: Undefined behavior may be expected when this International Standard omits any explicit definition of behavior or when a program uses an ...


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Looks like a typical case for std::shared_ptr. Obviously you'd need to explicitly reset the shared pointers to prevent cyclic references, or use std::weak_ptr in one direction. The current solution seems to suffer from excessive complexity. [edit] You may even look into a fancy technique. You can have multiple shared_ptr of different types share a single ...


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This is due to the way in which the classes are loaded. First the class StaticAssign definition is loaded and the fields are initialized to default values: StaticAssign.x = 0; Then the initalization block is executed. System.out.println(StaticAssign.x); x = 5; There is a reference to StaticAssign.x, the current class. As recursive initialization ...


2

It actually has been initialized. Variables in the global scope are initialized automatically. Variables of Object type will be initialized to null primitive like int will be initialized to 0. A variable declared not in the global scope must be initialized ie. declared in a method. Another problem is declaring it as final this is telling the compiler it ...


2

Undefined behavior means primarily a very simple thing, the behavior of the code in question is not defined so the C standard doesn't provide any clue of what can happen. Don't search more than that in it. If the C standard doesn't define something, your platform may well do so as an extension. So if you are in such a case, you can use it on that platform. ...


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As I mentioned in a comment, this test case can be reduced to: x = {} x[1] = len(x) The question then becomes, is x[1] == 0, or is x[1] == 1? Let's look at the relevant 2.x documentation and 3.x documentation: Python evaluates expressions from left to right. Notice that while evaluating an assignment, the right-hand side is evaluated before the ...


0

Yes, it's defined. len() is called before the assignment. However, dict's are not ordered in Python, which is why you sometimes see 0, 1 and 1, 0 in the output.


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In C90, this is UB. For C99 and C11, technically, it isn't, but the output is indeterminate. It's even possible, that another printf directly following will print a different value; uninitialized variables may appear to change without explicit action of the programme. Note, however, that an uninitialized variable can only be read if its address has been ...


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Both code-snippets induce undefined behavior if int has 32 bit or less. [expr.shift]/1: The behavior is undefined if the right operand is negative, or greater than or equal to the length in bits of the promoted left operand. Hence an implementation is not in any way obliged to provide consistent results.


3

When you do string { 50, 'x' } you're essentially initializing the string with a list of characters. On the other hand, string(50, 'x') calls a 2 argument constructor, which is defined to repeat the character x 50 times. The reason why string { 50, 'x' } doesn't pick the constructor is that it could be ambiguous. What if you had a three parameter ...



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