Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

_.contains vs _.some _.contains (_.contains(list, value, [fromIndex]) Returns true if the value is present in the list. Uses indexOf internally, if list is an Array. Use fromIndex to start your search at a given index. _.some (_.some(list, [predicate], [context])) Returns true if any of the values in the list pass the predicate truth test. ...


3

I would like to find a way to truly merge the two objects, so that all references to both objects point at a single destination. Is this possible in Javascript, or am I precluded from doing this as a result of Javascript's object passing structure? That's impossible without changing the references, i.e. having access to all the variables and ...


2

No, you cannot use _.find or any other synchronous iteration method with asynchronous callbacks - it doesn't work with filter either. You currently try to return from an asynchronous callback, which just won't work. You'll first need to write an asynchronous find function: function find(arr, predicate, i) { i = i >>> 0; if (i >= ...


2

You can use the findWhere function: var customer = _.findWhere(people, { 'id': customerId }); Alternatively, you can use a combination of find and matchesProperty: var customer = _.find(people, _.matchesProperty('id', customerId)); Generally, the find(collection, predicate) function finds you the first element in the collection that matches the ...


2

var sortedCollection = _.sortBy(collection, function(item){ return firstArray.indexOf(item.guid) });


2

Does JS have a Julian date library? That would make things a lot simpler. Here is some pseudo-Haskell code assuming that we have the following functions: toJulianDate :: Date -> Int toDate :: Int -> Date dayOfWeek :: Date -> Int -- 0 = Sun, 1 = Mon, ... 5 = Fri, etc. Then we can write: everyFridayBetween :: Date -> Date -> [Date] ...


2

Like this: var arr = ['Steve', 'Sally', 'George', 'Gina', 'Zelda']; var filtered = _.filter(arr, function(v) { return typeof v === 'string' && v[0] === 'Z'; }); console.log(filtered); <script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/underscore.js/1.8.2/underscore-min.js"></script>


1

Sure. Assuming all of your objects only have one key: var myArr = [ { "car" : "red" }, { "tree": "green" } ]; // First, find out the name of the key you're going to replace var newObj = { "car": "blue" }; var newObjKey = Object.keys(newObj)[0]; // => "car" // Next, get the index of the array item that has the key var index = _.findIndex(myArr, ...


1

I'm going to assume your posts array looks like this: [ { title: "Some Post", tags: { "name": "News" } }, ... ] I would simply use a filter: posts = _.filter(posts, function(post){ return !_.any(post.tags, function(tag){ return tag.name === 'News' } });


1

Note I am using stream.js and moment.js in my answer. So you'll have to do the following includes in your HTML (note that my syntax is in jade): script(src="path/to/stream.js") script(src="path/to/moment.js") And here is my code: var initDate = moment().day("Friday"); var endDate = moment().add(30,'days'); function allFridays() { return new ...


1

Somehow I made it work with this: var isAlreadyQueued = function() { return Q.ninvoke(kueSearcher, 'delayed') .then(function(ids) { return Q(_.find(ids, function(id) { return Q.ninvoke(kue.Job, 'get', id) .then(function(err, job) { return (job.type === 'jobtype'); ...


1

I was wondering if there's a way to use Haskell-like features such as list comprehensions or infinite lists (lazy evaluation) to make this a lot more concise. In ES6, you'll be able to use a generator function (spec, MDN) for the infinite list. In the meantime, loops in functional programming are usually accomplished via recursion, right? So: ...


1

You could just use Object.keys() method available on the native Object constructor , Which outputs the original objects own enumerable properties. Object.keys(obj);


1

1) _.contains vs _.some I think, it is possible to say, that _.contains is special case of _.some. That is, _.contains( list, value ) is a shortcut for _.some( list, function ( el ) { return value == 3; }) The second variant is just too verbose. In lodash such useful shortcuts presents in many functions, for example: var users = [ { 'user': ...


1

I think @thefourtheye's answer explains enough, but I thought that adding an example may help as well. _.contains vs _.some The big difference here is that _.contains allows you to provide a value and an index, while _.some allows you to provide a predicate. So, for example, let's say we have an array with the first 10 numbers [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, ...


1

Input: var data1 = ['129asg', '39342aa']; var data2 = [{ guid: '39342aa', name: 'John' }, { guid: '129asg', name: 'Mary' }]; First create an index object, with _.reduce, like this var indexObject = _.reduce(data2, function(result, currentObject) { result[currentObject.guid] = currentObject; return result; }, {}); And then map ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible