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115

sort -u -t, -k1,1 file -u for unique -t, so comma is the delimiter -k1,1 for the key field 1 Test result: overflow@domain2.com,2009-11-27 00:58:29.793000000,xx3.net,255.255.255.0 stack2@domain.com,2009-11-27 01:05:47.893000000,xx2.net,127.0.0.1


49

The UNIX Bash Scripting blog suggests: awk '!x[$0]++' This command is simply telling awk which lines to print. The variable $0 holds the entire contents of a line and square brackets are array access. So, for each line of the file, the node of the array x is incremented and the line printed if the content of that node was not (!) previously set.


34

Using 'sort -u' does less I/O than the 'sort | uniq', but the net result is the same. In particular, if the file is big enough that sort has to create intermediate files, there's a decent chance that 'sort -u' will use slightly fewer or slightly smaller intermediate files as it could eliminate duplicates as it is sorting each set. If the data is highly ...


20

uniq | sort does not work: uniq removes contiguous duplicates. The correct way is sort | uniq or better sort -u.


16

As the error states for SELECT DISTINCT, ORDER BY expressions must appear in select list. Therefore, you must explicitly select for the clause you are ordering by. Here is an example, it is similar to your case but generalize a bit. Article.select('articles.*, RANDOM()') .joins(:users) .where(:column => 'whatever') ...


12

awk -F"," '!_[$1]++' file -F sets the field separator. $1 is the first field. _[val] looks up val in the hash _(a regular variable). ++ increment, and return old value. ! returns logical not. there is an implicit print at the end.


11

All values for a key are sent to the same reducer. See this Yahoo! tutorial for more discussion. This behavior is determined by the partitioner, and might not be true if you use a partitioner other than the default.


11

uniq has the option you need: -u, --unique only print unique lines $ cat file.txt 1 1 2 3 5 5 7 7 $ uniq -u file.txt 2 3


10

Try to sort first: cat .temp_occ | sort| uniq -c | sort -k1,1nr -k2 > distribution.txt


10

That's actually fairly easy: a.group_by { |h| h.values_at("a", "b") }.map { |_, v| v.max_by { |h| h["c"] } } Or with nicer formatting: a.group_by do |h| h.values_at("a", "b") end.map do |_, v| v.max_by { |h| h["c"] } end Explanation: first we use Enumerable#group_by to create a Hash with the combinations of "a" and "b" (extracted with ...


9

There is one slight difference: return code. The thing is that unless shopt -o pipefail is set the return code of the piped command will be return code of the last one. And uniq always returns zero (success). Try examining exit code, and you'll see something like this (pipefail is not set here): pavel@lonely ~ $ sort -u file_that_doesnt_exist ; echo $? ...


9

Just use sort: sort -k 2,2 -u file The -u removes duplicate entries (as you wanted), and the -k 2,2 makes just the field 2 the sorting field (and so ignores the rest when checking for duplicates).


9

Your question isn't quite clear so I just reverse engineered your output to your input (assuming there is a typo in your output since you mention to count number of 1's, 2's and 3's from column 2 and show 2 R,2). You'll probably need to explain your question a little better - sort -t "," -k2 < p1.csv | awk -F, '!z[$2]++{ a[$2]=$0; } END {for (i in a) ...


8

Use sort and uniq: sort inputfile | uniq -u The -u option would cause uniq to print only unique lines. Quoting from man uniq: -u, --unique only print unique lines For your input, it'd produce: eagle forest


8

One way using awk: awk '!array[$2]++' file.txt Results: pep> AEYTCVAETK 2 genes ADUm.1024,ADUm.5198,ADUm.750 pep> AIQLTGK 1 genes ADUm.1999,ADUm.3560 pep> KHEPPTEVDIEGR 5 genes ADUm.367 pep> VSSILEDKTT 9 genes ADUm.1192,ADUm.2731 pep> VSSILEDKILSR 3 genes ADUm.2146,ADUm.5750


8

Use lowercase, lc with a map statement: my @uniq_no_case = uniq map lc, @elements; The reason List::MoreUtils' uniq is case sensitive is that it relies on the deduping characteristics of hashes, which also is case sensitive. The code for uniq looks like so: sub uniq { my %seen = (); grep { not $seen{$_}++ } @_; } If you want to use this sub ...


8

I believe that sort -u is suited to this exact scenario, and will both sort and uniquify things. Obviously, that'll be more efficient than calling sort and uniq individually in either order.


7

The only correct order is to call uniq after sort, since the man page for uniq says: Discard all but one of successive identical lines from INPUT (or standard input), writing to OUTPUT (or standard output). Therefore it should be grep 'somePattern' | sort | uniq


7

This can work for any given number of files: $ cat a.cnt b.cnt | awk '{a[$2]+=$1} END{for (i in a) print a[i],i}' 1 a 2 b 3 c So if you have let's say 10 files, you just have to do cat f1 f2 ... and then pipe this awk. If the file names happen to share a pattern, you can also do (thanks Adrian Fr├╝hwirth!): awk '{a[$2]+=$1} END{for (i in a) print ...


6

Pipe the output to sed -e 's/^ *//;s/ /,/' This first removes the leading spaces (^ *) then replaces the first space with a comma.


6

Feed the output from uniq -cd to awk sort test.file | uniq -cd | awk -v limit=2 '$1 > limit{print $2}'


6

Your attempt is pretty good. However, I think it can be easier and safer to get random values by using the shuf command: $ shuf -i 1-49 -n18 | xargs -n6 39 42 43 7 14 23 10 27 5 13 49 8 31 36 19 47 28 4 shuf -i X-Y -nZ gives Z random numbers in between X and Y. Then xargs -nT formats them in groups of T numbers per line. Update Now I see the comment: ...


6

Note that the uniq only counts repeated lines, and it must be preceded by sort for it to consider all lines in a file. For sort | uniq -c, the following code using collections.Counter is much more effective as it does not need to sort anything at all: from collections import Counter with open('test.in') as inf: counts = ...


6

You have to sort your data before you use uniq. It only removes/detects duplicates on adjacent lines.


6

This is because uniq! modifies self and if uniq! would return a value you wouldn't be able to know whether a change actually occurred in the original object. var = %w(green green yellow) if var.uniq! # the array contained duplicate entries else # nothing changed end In your code you can simply write hooks = ...


6

Well, I'm not sure that I've got the point of the thing you are trying to do, but I would do it this way: while read file do cat $file | tr -cs A-Za-z\' '\n'| tr A-Z a-z | sort | uniq -c > stat.$file done < file-list Now you have statistics for all your file, and now you simple aggregate it: while read file do cat stat.$file done < ...


6

You want the intersection of the arrays. c = a & b


5

You can use sort input.txt | uniq -c which will output 3 help 2 how 1 luke 1 mark from which you could continue processing the output. If you already know that the same entries are in a continuous block of lines you could of course skip the sort and use uniq directly, which will also preserve the order.


5

Use a hash to keep track of the words you have already seen, but also normalize them for upper/lower case: my %seen; my @unique; for my $w (@words) { next if $seen{lc($w)}++; push(@unique, $w); } # @unique has the unique words Note that this will preserve the case of the original words. UPDATE: As noted in the comments, it's not clear exactly what ...


5

The 10 most used commands stored in your history: history | sed -e 's/ *[0-9][0-9]* *//' | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | head -10 This gives you the most used command line entries by removing the history number (sed), counting (sort | uniq -c), sorting by frequency (sort -rn) and showing only the top ten entries. If you just want the commands alone: ...



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