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11

A possible reason is that the unique_ptr constructor that takes a unique_ptr::pointer argument is explicit. This means that in the absence of the unique_ptr(nullptr_t) constructor, the following code would not compile. std::unique_ptr<int> intp = nullptr; Since a unique_ptr is intended to be a lightweight smart pointer that closely imitates raw ...


6

std::unique_ptr<int> upi{new int[42]{}}; has undefined behavior. You're allocating memory using new[] and the unique_ptr is going to call delete, and not delete[], in its destructor. upi[0]; doesn't compile because the unique_ptr::operator[] overload only exists for the unique_ptr<T[]> partial specialization. std::unique_ptr<int*> ...


5

You promised the compiler a destructor for Base, so it made calls to it. But then you never wrote one, so when the linker sees those calls it doesn't know what to do. You can fix it as easily as changing virtual ~Base(); to virtual ~Base() {} The latter has a body; it's a real definition.


4

unique_ptr::release relinquishes ownership of the managed object without destroying it. unique_ptr::reset will destroy the object using the supplied deleter. It's not that calling release() is running the deleter on the wrong unique_ptr instance, but that it's not running the deleter on the instance on which you called release(). The deleter for the other ...


4

Here is a self-contained sample demonstrating the problem: template <typename T> int f() { return T(); } struct S { int i = f<void>(); S() : i(0) { } }; In your example, f is named make_unique, and it doesn't return int, but that doesn't fundamentally change anything. Yes, Visual Studio's compiler accepts that, and other compilers ...


3

In the second case you're creating a temporary instance of a unique_ptr and calling the get() member function on it. The unique_ptr object will be destroyed at the end of the full expression (at the semicolon). Widget* w = std::unique_ptr<Widget>(new WindowsButton()).get(); // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^ // ...


3

This problem is actually not related to C++11, unique_ptr or pretty printing. The problem is that gcc does not emit code for std::unique_ptr::operator* that could be called by gdb to dereference the unique_ptr. If you for instance add *pTest; to your code then gdb does perform the dereferencing. A similar problem is described in the SO post How to ...


3

I thought you weren't able/supposed to copy unique_ptr's Indeed you can't. But you can move them, transferring ownership of the managed object from one smart pointer to another. Is the unique_ptr's move method being invoked? Yes. A function's return value is moved if possible; and assignment from the temporary return value is also done by moving. ...


2

I think you're after this: std::unique_ptr<std::vector<std::vector<T> > > PtrToMyMatrix(new std::vector<std::vector<T> >(1, std::vector<T>(1))); The constructor is std::vector(size_type n, const value_type& val); (alloc missing). So you construct the outer vector with 1 inner vector that is constructed with 1 ...


1

The way I do it is push the ownership issue farther down. Foo has a buffer, and knows how to clean up that buffer when it is destroyed. The std::shared_ptr has a destroy callback that can be used for that purpose, for example. This shows the accepted pattern of having the smart pointer know how this particular instance is to be deleted. Really, you ...


1

unique_ptr::release() does not delete the internal pointer, instead it releases the ownership of it. See the doc. So in your case calling release() just causes memory leak.


1

Please define base class destructor virtual ~Base() {} Refer following example http://ideone.com/0PNWN6


1

Your compareCards function takes the unique_ptrs by value, this won't work as they are not copyable (the unique_ptr copy constructor is implicitly deleted due to the presence of move constructors, a copyable unique_ptr wouldn't be very unique would it?). Change it to bool compareCards(cardPtr const& A, cardPtr const& B);


1

There's an iterator adaptor in boost that does just that: #include <boost/iterator/indirect_iterator.hpp> ... using ExprIterator = boost::indirect_iterator<std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Expr>>::iterator>; ExprIterator expr_begin() { return std::begin(m_exprs); } ExprIterator expr_end() { return std::end(m_exprs; } Source: ...


1

Be carefull, as QStandardItemModel has ownership of standard items. Therefore you would get a double delete when you associated a standard item with a unique pointer. In general, with Qt you don't need to use unique pointers, as parents already have ownership of their children.


1

Maybe you misunderstood a bit of unique_ptr. It is not a means to help with the memory management of raw pointers, but to replace raw pointers. In both of your examples you fall back to call get() on your unique_ptr to obtain a raw poitner and work with it. That is not needed. You can do with a unique_ptr all you are used to do with a raw pointer, except ...


1

The original proposal that lead to the constructor being added is here, and explains the use case: it's intended to make if (p == 0) compile. This works because in that comparison, the RHS of == is implicitly convertible to the type of p, because of the nullptr constructor. Prior to that change, unique_ptr had an implicit conversion operator to a bool-ish ...


1

A Foo* that happens to have a value of 0 is not type nullptr_t, it is the type Foo*. So, only passing nullptr uses the nullptr_t constructor.


1

It looks to me like you are overflowing your buffer. The comments indicate that len is supposed to be an output parameter yielding the size of the resulting data, but you're using its input value to size your array. Result: the allocated buffer has an unknown size, perhaps zero, and the results don't fit, so they overwrite metadata stored adjacent to the ...



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