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10

std::sort still needs iterators, and unique_ptr is not an iterator. However, it does hold onto something that can be used as one: its pointer: std::sort(v.get(), v.get() + 100); or std::sort(&*v, &*v + 100); or std::sort(&v[0], &v[0] + 100); // N.B. &v[100] invokes undefined behavior But what you really want is a vector ...


7

You're trying to move from a constant Wrapper object. Generally move semantics also require the object you are moving away from to be mutable (i.e. not const). In your code the type of the other parameter in the add_all method is const Wrapper&, therefore other.foos also refers to a constant vector, and you can't move away from it. Change the type of ...


6

The unique_ptr's specification explicitly states that the effect of move operations on such pointers is transfer of ownership from the right-hand side pointer to the left-hand side pointer (20.8.1/16 for move constructor, 20.8.1.2.3/2 for assignment). The concept of transfer of ownership is explicitly defined in the standard (20.8.1/4) and it says that the ...


6

You are printing the window position after a loop on while (window_->isOpen()). This means the window is closed, i.e. it does not exist when you call getPosition(). Therefore it is no surprise that the window position is not reported "correctly," because the window has already been closed (permanently, so it has no position).


5

The standard only guarantees that: template <class T, class... Args> unique_ptr<T> std::make_unique(Args&&... args); ...must returns unique_ptr<T>(new T(std::forward<Args>(args)...)), it does not guarantee that the make_unique function should only exist if T is constructible using Args..., so it is not SFINAE friendly (per ...


5

As far as I understand, you want to make the integer const and not the pointer itself, right? Then you would have to write: unqiue_ptr<const int> upi{new int{4}};


4

template <class T, class F> inline auto toUniquePtr(T t, F f) Given the function template above, T is being deduced as void *. So std::unique_ptr<T, decltype( deleter )> expects to be passed a T *, aka void **. To fix the error, change the template to template <class T, class F> inline auto toUniquePtr(T *t, F f) // ...


4

Reading the link from the question, it seems you'd be happy using a vector if it didn't call an unnecessary constructor for every element. There are techniques to eliminate this overhead. std::vector<int> v; v.reserve(100); for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) v.emplace_back(rand()); std::sort(v.begin(), v.end());


3

No you can't. You can't stop people from doing stupid stuff. Declare a templated function that returns a new object based on the templated parameter.


3

The unique_ptr implementation you tested uses the empty base-class optimization to avoid wasting space to store the deleter in the common case where the deleter is an empty class. The optimization means that sizeof(unique_ptr<T, D>) == sizeof(T) If you use a non-empty class as the deleter (e.g. by adding a member variable to the deleter) then you ...


3

You can't prevent programmers from doing stupid things. Both std::unique_ptr and std::shared_ptr contain the option to create an instance with an existing ptr. I've even seen cases where a custom deleter is passed in order to prevent deletion. (Shared ptr is more elegant for those cases) So if you have a pointer, you have to know the ownership of it. This ...


3

You need to use unique_ptr version for dynamically allocated arrays: std::unique_ptr<std::list<int>[]> map1(new std::list<int>[10]); ^^ ~~~~~ ! See here: http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/memory/unique_ptr : template < class T, class Deleter > class unique_ptr<T[], Deleter>; You can ...


2

std::unique_ptr is a container for a pointer with only a single action on it: Deleting the instance it refers to when it is destroyed. (or when reset() is called) So as long as the destructor or the reset function is not called, you'll have code which is running. However if you rewrite the Start() function to also throw an exception, you will get a crash. ...


1

This is not working, however, if I delete the constructor of A, it works. When you removed the user defined constructor, the compiler implicitly generates a default one. When you provide a user defined constructor, the compiler doesn't implicitly generate a default constructor. std::make_unique<T[]> requires the use of default constructors... ...


1

can I rely on this? Yes you can. Move on a std::unique_ptr means transferring ownership from it, and then operator bool will return false certainly since it doesn't own any object.


1

You cannot stop people from doing the wrong thing. But you can encourage them to do the right thing. Or at least, if they do the wrong thing, make it more obvious. For example, with Bar, don't let the constructor take naked pointers. Make it take unique_ptrs, either by value or by &&. That way, you force the caller to create those unique_ptrs. ...


1

I've seen something similar before. The trick is that you create a function (let's call it make_unique) that takes the object (not pointer, the object, so maybe with an implicit constructor, it can "take" the class constructor arguments) and this function will create and return the unique_ptr. Something like this: template <class T> ...


1

Since you are pairing up RichDocument and RichApplication in the class hierarchy, you should be prepared to do one of the following: Accept any base document when constructing a rich document, or Reject all documents except RichDocument. Assuming that the only way to initialize _doc is in the constructor of RichApplication, the second approach should be ...


1

A A list<int> and a list<int>[10] are two different types. When you have a unique_ptr<list<int>> You are telling unique_ptr that it is going to point to a list<int>. When the unique_ptr goes out of scope it is going to call delete to delete the underlying pointer. Unfortunetly you initialize it with new ...


1

The PartClass object still exists, and that's what was intended, so it absolutely should not be deleted. The question is really why isn't part set to a null pointer, and that's because it's up to you to manage such things. The pointer is valid, and you can use it if you want to. If you don't want to use it, don't keep it around.


1

By passing part to the unique_ptr you passed across ownership of the pointer to unique_ptr. Yes, you've still got a raw pointer, but as you've given ownership to the smart pointer you should consider it off limits. You certainly don't want to be deleting it.


1

It works for the same reason that you can explicitly give out the pointer. For example: std::unique_ptr<int> value = std::make_unique<int>(1); int* pValue = value.get(); While pValue can access the memory it does not own it and should not delete the memory. In your example the ownership has been transferred while there happens to be a raw ...


1

A unique_ptr is just another class from the compiler standpoint. As it stands, one of its ctors accepts a raw pointer. It's dtor will release the memory via passed in raw pointer (typically free). The fact your variable part points to the same memory location does not change any of the unique_ptr behaviour. In this context that is just another local ...


1

On line X, you're transferring the ownership of the object pointed to by p to the created unique_ptr<int> a. You should not explicitly delete it later, otherwise you have a double deletion error. If you don't want the unique_ptr to delete the object it points to, you should release it before destruction, e.g: int main() { int * p = new int(10); ...



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