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4

C++11 is required for smart pointers. Depending on your version of Qt:Add CONFIG += c++11 to your .pro file if you have Qt5 and above. It needs to include <memory> as Simon mentioned. If you have an earlier version than Qt5, try adding this: QMAKE_CXXFLAGS += -std=c++11


2

Include memory: #include <memory> Configure your Qt project to use C++11. Add to your .pro file: CONFIG += c++11 If that does not solve the problem, please add a detailed error message.


8

You could reset it, which replaces the managed resources with a new one (in your case there's no actual deletion happening though). my_str_ptr.reset(new std::string(another_str_var)); You could create a new unique_ptr and move assign it into your original, though this always strikes me as messy. my_str_ptr = std::unique_ptr<std::string>{new ...


1

This make_vector is a function that takes any number of arguments, and perfect-forwards them into a vector. // get the first type in a pack, if it exists: template<class...Ts> struct first {}; template<class T, class...Ts> struct first<T,Ts...>{ using type=T; }; template<class...Ts> using first_t=typename first<Ts...>::type; ...


3

You're calling the vector constructor ((7) on the linked page) that takes an initializer_list<T> argument. An initializer_list only allows const access to its elements, so the vector must copy the elements, and this, of course, fails to compile. The following should work std::unique_ptr<test1> us(new test1()); ...


1

If you encounter this often, it might make sense to write a class, that behaves like a unique_ptr, but passes the constness of the pointer to the object it points to. That way, you can just return a const reference to your vector. I ended up writing this once and be done with it: #include <iostream> #include <vector> #include <memory> ...


-2

I tried this: public: const std::vector<int const *> getResource() { return reinterpret_cast<std::vector<const int *> &>(resources); } private: std::vector<unique_ptr<int>> resources; It worked.


-1

You might want to consider shared_ptr instead, as it probably reflects what you are trying to achieve. You'll probably want to use unique_ptr in smaller scopes, or any time you wish to reflect only one thing using an object.


14

I would suggest that instead of maintaining and returning an un-unique_ptred vector, you provide functions to access the elements directly. This encapsulates the storage of your resources; clients don't know that they are stored as unique_ptrs, nor that they are kept in a vector. One possibility for this is to use boost::indirect_iterator to dereference ...


5

Yes, it is valid. You can have multiple (plain) pointers pointing to the same object. The question is how long those pointers are valid or when the object pointed to is deleted. A unique_ptr stores one more plain pointer and takes ownership, meaning it is responsible for when the object is destroyed. Moving it to another unique_ptr just transfers ...


5

Why am I not able to compile? You are unable to compile because make_unique is not a friend of Spam. An altenative solution to making make_unique a friend is to move the call to make_unique into Spam. class Spam { ... private: static unique_ptr<Spam> create( int i ) { return std::make_unique<Spam>(i); } }; and then have Foo call that ...


3

Here is another approach I've seen used : have the public constructor require a private access token. I don't remember the name of this pattern though. class Spam { static struct Token {} const token; friend void Foo(); public: Spam(Token const&, int mem) :mem(mem) {} private: int mem; }; void Foo() { std::unique_ptr<Spam> ...


0

In your example, Foo() is a friend, but it isn't the function that's creating the Spam - make_unique is internally calling new Spam itself. The simple fix is to just have Foo() actually construct the Spam directly: void Foo() { std::unique_ptr<Spam> spam(new Spam(10)); }


12

In your case the function make_unique is trying to create an instance of Spam and that function is not a friend. Calling a non-friend function from inside a friend function does not imbue the non-friend function with friend status. To solve this you can write in Foo: std::unique_ptr<Spam> spam(new Spam(10));


1

Let's simplify your question down to: vector<unique_ptr<Foo>> foos; foos.push_back(unique_ptr<Foo>(new Foo(100))); auto local = std::move(foos[0]); std::cout << foos[0]->x << '\n'; After you create local by moving foos[0], foos[0] no longer has ownership of a pointer. It is empty. Dereferencing it becomes undefined ...


2

If you're holding items in a unique_ptr, it normally implies that you're not looking to copy them. If you want to copy them you'll have to provide the mechanism to do so: struct my_thing { }; using my_thing_ptr = std::unique_ptr<my_thing>; struct my_container { my_container() {} // the presence of _thing will implicitly delete copy constructor ...


0

This worked for me. Edit to note I'm using string as the type only to make it easier to read, you must replace it with your type. #include <memory> #include <string> #include <iostream> #include <utility> class Base { public: Base(std::unique_ptr<std::string> new_p) : p(std::move(new_p)) {} ...


1

I'd replace ??? with std::unique_ptr<MyType> and then std::move it in the mem-initializer. class Base { public: Base(std::unique_ptr<MyType> new_p) : p(std::move(new_p)) {} std::unique_ptr<MyType> p; }; class Derived : public Base { Derived(std::unique_ptr<MyType> new_p) : Base(std::move(new_p)) {} }; You could also ...


1

Depends what you want to support - either or both of the constructors below make sense, from MyType* or a std::unique_ptr<MyType>&&, which requires a movable unique_ptr be supplied by the caller. Simply using std::unique_ptr<MyType> works too, because std::unique_ptr has a constructor from other movable instances... just a matter of ...


5

You need to const-cast the stored pointer, not unique_ptr: const_cast<const A*>(m_ptrA.get())->bar(); const_cast<const A&>(*m_ptrA).bar();


3

It cannot infer the type of the deleter, because unique_ptr by default has no state devoted to a deleter: the default deleter is stateless. In your case, the deleter needs a pointer's worth of state, so it cannot 'fit' within the std::unique_ptr's state (which is just a pointer to a T). This makes unique_ptr a lightweight, nearly cost-free replacement for ...


6

For unique_ptr, the deleter is part of the type: template < class T, class Deleter = std::default_delete<T> > class unique_ptr; As such, when you're constructing an object, you need to specify its type. The line you're writing: std::unique_ptr<int> x(new int, custom_deleter); is equivalent to: std::unique_ptr<int, ...


2

Your problem is two fold. First, you are capturing by reference in a lambda whose lifetime (and the lifetime of its copies) exceeds the current local scope. Don't do that. Only use [&] if your lambda (and all copies) will not be copied out of the lifetime of the local scope. The naive answer is to then do a [=] or [y], but you cannot copy a unique ...


2

void put(std::unique_ptr<Y> y) { m_queue.push([&] { foo(std::move(y)); }); } Here, you push a lambda that contains a reference to the local variable y. The moment you leave put, the local variable is destroyed, and the lambda contains a dangling reference. Any further behavior is undefined. You would need to capture the local variable by ...


2

Because y gets destroyed: void put(std::unique_ptr<Y> y) { m_queue.push([&] { // <== capturing y by-reference foo(std::move(y)); }); // <== y gets destroyed here } At the end of put(), y has already been cleaned up. You'd want your functor to take ownership of y, which would ideally look something like: [p = ...


4

void put(std::unique_ptr<Y> y) { m_queue.push([&] { foo(std::move(y)); }); } In this function, y is a local variable which gets destroyed when it goes out of scope. The local variable is captured (by reference), by the lambda, doesn't exist by the time when it is executed — it is pointing to nothing/null/garbage/whatever, as the y has ...


0

I think you need something like boost.any or QVariant.


1

The SDL_Window type is, just like the compiler says, incomplete. The SDL library is using a common pattern in C language: pointers to incomplete type. At the point you create the unique pointer, the SDL_Window type looks to the compiler like this: struct SDL_Window; That's one way you can create an incomplete type. The compiler doesn't know anything ...


1

I assume your get a c++11 compiler. template <typename T> struct Message { std::unique_ptr<T> data; Message(){} // 1. add default constructor, as you have a customer constructor, compiler will not define the default constructor automatically Message(std::unique_ptr<T>&& data): data(std::move(data)) {} //2, a ...


3

The answer of @R. Sahu is correct imo. However, if you insist of passing a non-static member function deleter, here is a way of doing it using the good old std::bind and std::function: #include <memory> #include <iostream> #include <functional> class Foo { private: std::unique_ptr<int, std::function<void(int*)>> _up; ...


2

The second template parameter used in the declaration of uptr_curl_ is void (*)(CURL *) The type of &client::del_curl is void (CURL::*)(CURL*). They are not the same. You can change del_curl to a static member function. That will resolve the problem. Update You can use a non-static member function with the help of std::function and std::bind. class ...


0

You can always wrap the type that needs a custom deleter. Actually you should do this, since custom deleters are implementation details which you wouldn't want exposed to the public anyway.



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