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0

You're going to need some kind of custom code, whether you put it in validateValue:forKey:error: or in a custom method or somewhere else. Whether to use the built-in validation method is really a matter of how you prefer to organize your code. I'd prefer to do something like Check to see if the value is unique. If so, then insert a new instance. That's ...


0

select id,name,heart=(select distinct(heart) from organ where id=1318 and heart is not null) ,brain= (select distinct(brain) from organ where id=1318 and brain is not null) ,lungs=(select distinct(lungs) from organ where id=1318 and lungs is not null) ,kidneys = (select distinct(kidneys) from organ where id=1318 and kidneys is not null) ...


0

What you want to do here is aggregate your results by ID and NAME. This means that there will only be one row for each unique (ID, NAME) pair. This can be achieved with the GROUP BY keyword. Now, depending on the Database you are using (MySQL, DB2, ...) this query might look a bit different, but you could try this one: SELECT ID, NAME, MAX(Heart), ...


3

Assuming each organ can either have just one value or a null, as shown in the sample data, the max aggregate function should do the trick: SELECT id, name, MAX(heart), MAX(brain), MAX(lungs), MAX(kidneys), age FROM my_table GORUP BY id, name, age


0

Here is another alternative using unique() and hist(): count elements: [elements,indices,~] = unique(A); % get each value with index once counts = hist(A(:), elements); % count occurrences of elements within a get elements: uniqueElements = elements(counts==1); % find unique elements get indices: uniqueIndices = ...


0

I figured out the problem. The error layed with how I was filling in the array that the datalist values came from. Instead of using the "$scope.stateDistrictList[i] = {state : data[i].state, districts : data[i].district };" code to fill in the array, I instead needed to use $scope.stateDistrictList.push({ state: data[i].state, district: ...


0

With helper columns this could be achieved without any array formulas. The idea is to get first a concatenation of date and name, then get only the line number of the first occurrence of date&name in the list, get those line numbers without duplicates and finally get the INDEXes of those line numbers from A:A and B:B. Formulas: D1:D13 =A1&B1 ...


0

Much the easiest way to achieve this is with a PivotTable. Add labels to Columns A and B (say Date and Name) then select A:B, INSERT, Tables - PivotTable, chose where in Existing Sheet or New Sheet and drag Date and then Name (below) into ROWS. Reformat as desired.


0

Considering mainly your last sentence: =ArrayFormula(sort(unique({B1:B;D1:D;G1:G})))


1

You should not use ints for your phone numbers. For one thing, phone numbers are 10 digits (all positive), so they could easily exceed the capacity of int. For another thing, phone numbers are just not integers... You'd never add or substract or multiply by a phone number. Here's what it should look like: public enum PhoneType { ... // fill in the possible ...


3

You can do something like: public class PhoneNumber { private int number; private String type; public static Map<Integer, PhoneNumber> knownNumbers = new HashMap<Integer, PhoneNumber>(); public PhoneNumber(int number1,String type1) throws AlreadyExistsNumberException{ validate(number1); this.number = number1; ...


0

Use a groupby to get at each combination of col_1 and col_3, then unstack to get the col_3 values as columns: # Copying your data and reading from the clipboard: df = pd.read_clipboard() unique_counts = df.groupby(['col_1', 'col_3'])['col_2'].unique().map(len) unstacked = unique_counts.unstack(level='col_3').fillna(0) Output: unstacked Out[18]: col_3 ...


2

One option is to maintain in your class a static Set of all the names previously used. When a new instance is created, you check if the name given to the new instance is already in use (assuming the name is passed to the constructor). If it is, you throw an exception. If not, you add it to the Set. If you have a public setName method, you should check the ...


1

I'm probably gonna get a down-vote but I just have to share. I usually fix this with time(), because there is almost zero possibility to have a duplicate entry of time() (unless by some miracle two file processing happens at the same fraction of time). I don't stop there, I sometimes add the username to the string, along with some other random code that ...


0

Here is an O(N2) recursive version for fun: def uniquify(s): if len(s) < 2: return s return remove(s[:-1]) + s[-1] * (s[-1] not in s[:-1])


0

Here is a recursive O(N2) version for fun: def is_unique(lst): if len(lst) > 1: return is_unique(s[1:]) and (s[0] not in s[1:]) return True


0

For your question on how to make the nodes unique: There's no need for the node's name to be the value. Networkx allows lots of things as nodes (anything hashable). So you could for example have a class defined and each node is an element of that class with node.value() giving the actual numerical value. In this case, a decent option would be to note that ...


0

[table] word | definition abeyar | VaVeVhVjVkVmVpVrVtGa abeya | SfGaYs abeyera | SfGaYs abeyerin | SmGaYs abeyerín | SmGaYs abeyéru | AaApGaYs abeyéru | Zz abeyéru | DdRr abeyéru | YyGgKk abeyéru | WwSs abeyéru | XxCc abeyéru | AaApGaYs abeyerucu | SmGaYs abeyeru | SaGaYs abeyeru | Xxxxxx abeyeru | SmGaYs ...


0

Use Group_Concat Function. select word,group_concat(definition) As 'definition' from crostab group by word SQLFIDDLE DEMO


0

Might as well add a dplyr solution too: library(dplyr) newdf <- yourdata %>% group_by(ELK_ID, JulDate) %>% sample_n(4)


2

You can also create an index using tapply and then just subset (assuming your data set called df) indx <- unlist(tapply(seq_len(dim(df)[1L]), df[, c("JulDate", "ELK_ID")], function(x) sample(x, 4))) df[indx, ]


1

Try to split using both columns, maybe split(dataset, dataset[, c("ELK_ID", "JulDate")])


2

Here is a data.table solution. library(data.table) setDT(dataset)[,.SD[sample(.N,4)],by=list(ELK_ID,JulDate)] # ELK_ID JulDate FID FIX_NO ALTITUDE XLOC YLOC DATE_TIME # 1: 393 140 NA 5297 2254.992 547555.9 4771906 NA # 2: 393 140 NA 5299 2247.047 547564.7 4771907 NA # 3: 393 140 NA 5298 2256.078 ...


1

You do not need so many nested loops. This works with the sample you provided. It uses a working table which is reduced as duplicates are found. for ii = 1:1:size(U_vector,2) A = U_vector{ii} ; %// create a working copy of the current table store{ii} = [] ; %// initialize the result cell array endOfTable = false ; while ...


3

There's an undocumented function to merge similar points, which works on rows too: >> u = [0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1; 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0; 0 -0.4238 0 0.4238 -0.4238 0 0.4238 0 0.8161001 -0.8161]; >> uMerged = builtin('_mergesimpts',u.',0.3).' uMerged = ...


0

What about this?!: u = cell2mat(U_vector{1}); i=1; while i<=size(u,2) test=repmat(u(:,i),1,size(u,2)); % compare matrix entries to current column i differentCols = ~all(same); % column indices that are not equal to column i differentCols(i)=1; % ensure one such column stays in u u=u(:,differentCols); % new u-> ...


0

You didn't provide any code or specify winforms/excel/vb.net, so I'm going with what I know in winforms. I mocked your object and bound dataGridView1's datasource to a bindinglist called Transactions. Then I created methods to filter that list, sort it, and add it to the source of a second temporary dgview. public class Transaction { public int TagID { ...


1

If you want to maintain a unique column in a database, then use the database mechanisms for that. Create a unique index or unique constraint on the column. Work with the database, not against it. Furthermore, there is a major issue with your first approach. You are introducing a race condition. Two processes could attempt to insert the same record at ...


0

Here is another variation for @Greg pythonic answer np.vstack(set(map(tuple, a)))


1

This can be achieved efficiently in Numpy by combining lexsort and unique as follows import numpy as np a = np.array([[0, 1, 1.2, 3], [1, 5, 3.2, 4], [3, 4, 2.8, 4], [2, 6, 2.3, 5]]) # Sort by last column and 3rd column when values are equal j = np.lexsort(a.T) # Find first occurrence (=smallest 3rd column) of ...


-1

You should be able to do array_column, and then array unique, so try this: array_unique(array_column($cmpnt, 'cmpnt_name'));


0

I now am running the clean override from the form instead of the model (as recommended by Daniel). This has solved a bunch of issues and I now have a working concept: models.py class UserStuff(models.Model): username = models.ForeignKey(User) name_field = models.CharField(max_length=24, ...


0

Here's a UDF I wrote for myself a while back. It will add the unique values in any 2D range. Public Function SUMU(ByVal r As Range) As Double On Error Resume Next Application.Volatile Dim nUniques() As Double Dim v As Variant, vValues As Variant Dim i As Long, nCount As Long Dim bMatch As Boolean vValues = r.Value If ...


0

I'd suggest using a search index for this. How do you generate Name from FirstName and LastName? Assuming they are concatenated, your index would look something like: function(doc) { if(doc.userDetails.email) { index("email", doc.userDetails.email); } var name = doc.userDetails.firstName + " " + doc.userDetails.lastName; name = ...


1

Your items are dict so you won't be able to use set directly (check frozenset or this question/answer). But you still can compare the items: >>> l[0]==l[1] True >>> l[0]==l[2] False So simply add your elements to a new list if it's not already present: >>> l2=[] >>> for i in l: ... if i not in l2: ... ...


5

You'd need to track if you have seen a dictionary already. Unfortunately, dictionaries are not hashable, and do not track order, so you need to convert dictionaries to something that is hashable. A frozenset() of the key-value pairs (as tuples) would do, but then you need to flatten recursively: def set_from_dict(d): return frozenset( (k, ...


0

Try: SELECT * FROM table1 LEFT OUTER JOIN table2 ON table1.FirstName = table2.FirstName and table1.LastName=table2.LastName WHERE table2.BirthDate IS NULL


0

You need not to first find the largest number in the table and then add one number to it and then submit. In your data table in mysql turn id into primary key and make it auto increment true that will always insert a unique and increased id. syntax for the same ALTER TABLE tbl_name ADD id INT PRIMARY KEY AUTO_INCREMENT;


0

Here is the awk code to get total count of unique ips zcat *file* | awk '{a[$1]} END {print length(a)}'


0

You might want: zcat ... | awk '{cnt[$1]++} END{for (ip in cnt) {unq++; print cnt[ip], ip}; print unq+0}' If you have GNU awk you can add BEGIN{PROCINFO["sorted_in"]="@ind_num_asc"} at the front to get the loop output sorted, see http://www.gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/gawk.html#Controlling-Scanning.


3

This works in Rails 4 (possibly earlier): service_ids = CarService.where(car: @cars).pluck(:service_id).uniq Service.where(id: service_ids).pluck(:name) Substitute :name for the Service field that contains the strings you are after (use .map as needed.)


2

You can approach the problem from the other side and do this (resulting in a single query): Service.joins(:cars).where(cars: {id: Car.where(shipped_at: params[:shipped])}).uniq.pluck(:name)


0

If anyone is interested in the implementation, here's a ruby version of the push–relabel maximum flow algorithm with relabel-to-front selection rule. def relabel_to_front(capacities, source, sink) n = capacities.length flow = Array.new(n) { Array.new(n, 0) } height = Array.new(n, 0) excess = Array.new(n, 0) seen = Array.new(n, 0) ...


2

You can express this problem as a maximum flow problem: Make edges of capacity 1 from a source node to each of your left numbers. Make edges of capacity 3 from each of your right numbers to a sink node. Make edges of capacity 1 from left number a to right number b for each pair of the form (a, b). Compute the maximum flow in this network from source to ...


3

It is not especially clear what you want created or done. There is no code here, not even R code showing how what you want is done in R. There is no reproducible example. You might want to check out egen, group(). (A previous answer to this effect from @Dimitriy V. Masterov, an experienced user of Stata, was twice incorrectly deleted as spam, presumably by ...


0

There are a few steps you can take to accomplish this task more efficiently. First and foremost, making use of the data analyst cursor as opposed to the older version of cursor will increase the speed of your process. This assumes you are working in 10.1 or beyond. Then you can employ summary statistics, namely its ability to find a minimum value based off a ...


0

If you have the statistics toolbox, you can also do the following: valnom = nominal(val); countries = getlabels(valnom); occurrences = levelcounts(valnom);


3

You can use unique with histc - %// Get countries and their occurences [countries,~,id] = unique(cellstr(val),'stable') occurrences = histc(id,1:max(id)) You can then display the number of occurrences against the country names as a table - >> table(countries,occurrences) ans = countries occurrences _________ ___________ 'USA' ...


4

Use the third output of unique, and make sure that those input strings are in a cell array. The third output of unique is pretty cool, because it assigns a unique ID for each unique quantity that is seen in the input. As such, if you had a sequence of characters from a to e, it would assign a unique ID for each unique character that it has found, between 1 ...


0

This will give you the number of occurrences by using regexp: unique_countries = unique(regexp(val,'^.*$','lineanchors','match','dotexceptnewline')); count_unique_countries = zeros(size(unique_countries)); for ii = 1:numel(unique_countries) count_unique_countries(ii) = numel(regexp(val,['^' unique_countries{ii} '$'],'lineanchors')); end The two ...



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