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0

Since nobody could give me an answer, I've created a small python script, which does exactly this job. https://github.com/white-gecko/simplepatch To apply such a patch call it with (where outfile.txt is generated) ./simplepatch.py -m patch -i infile.txt -p patchfile.txt -o outfile.txt To generate a patch/diff call it with (where patchfile.txt is ...


1

Don't know if it's "better", but it's more to-the-point: select case when exists ( select * from ... where ... ) then 1 else 0 end as IsThereOrNot ...and can be used with other expressions (if you need 'em). Note: select * is appropriate for existence checks, and nolock isn't going to change anything - there's an implicit ...


2

Here is another alternative yourNewSet = map(set,list(set(map(tuple,yourSet))))


2

An alternative using a loop: result = list() for item in L: if item not in result: result.append(item)


10

The best way is to convert your sets to frozensets (which are hashable) and then use set to get only the unique sets, like this >>> list(set(frozenset(item) for item in L)) [frozenset({2, 4}), frozenset({3, 6}), frozenset({1, 2}), frozenset({5, 6}), frozenset({1, 4}), frozenset({3, 5})] If you want them as sets, then you can convert them ...


0

Here is my 2 cents on this: def inique(nums): unique = [] for n in nums: if n not in unique: unique.append(n) return unique Regards, Yuriy


2

And a data.table solution: library(data.table) mrg <- function(x) paste(unique(x[!is.na(x)]),collapse=", ") setDT(example)[,list(Title=head(Title,1), Email=mrg(Email), Phone=mrg(Phone)), by="Name"] # Name Title Email Phone # 1: Oswald Gruber Chair abc@abc.com +33 12345, +44 54321 # 2: Kaspar ...


1

You can group by Name and convert each column to a list. library(dplyr) dat %>% group_by(Name) %>% summarise_each(funs(list)) -> res So, it looks like data.frame(res) # Name Title Email # 1 Kaspar Villiger Comm.mngr qwe@rty.com # 2 Markus Urben Investment ...


-1

I'd split it out into a relational database. This is assuming that names can serve as a unique key to identify a person. library(dplyr) test = data_frame( Title = c("Chair", "Respondent", "Comm.mngr", "Investment mngr", "Responsible"), Name = c("Oswald Gruber", "Oswald Gruber", "Kaspar Villiger", "Markus Urben", "Markus Urben"), Email = ...


1

Assuming your "example" object is a data.frame (may also work with a matrix). For those columns you want to retain all the information, you could do this (untested for coding typos): result <- aggregate(example[,c("Phone","Email")], by = list(Name = example[,"Name"]), FUN = paste, sep = ", ") Thus phone numbers and eMail adresses will be pasted into ...


0

I think hyde means (first-1) + range_of_first * second + range_of_first * range_of_second * third = (first-1) + 600*second + 600*5*third = (first-1) + 600*second + 3000*third . You need to store 45000 different values, so you just can't fit them into 2 signed bytes, but they would fit into 2 unsigned bytes.


4

First, let's convert the first range to 0-599, marked as first-1 below. Then, all you need to do is multiply the numbers together, using range maximums as multipliers: range_of_first = 599 + 1 = 600 range_of_second = 4 + 1 = 5 range_of_third = 14 + 1 = 15 (first-1) + range_of_first * second + range_of_first * range_of_second * third = (first-1) + ...


0

Convert them into strings with zero padding. Concatenate them after padding with zeroes. Then convert them back into an integer. So 20-1-8 would become "020108" and then 20108 when you turn it into an integer. To get the numbers back, reconvert into string and parse from right to left based on number of digits.


1

I found a solution. Basically, we can conditionally modify a rule entry. In this case, I look for cars inside the authenticated company, if the car name exists, then I change the rule to be unique on the cars table, which will fail because there is already a car with the same name in this table. Here is my new rules function inside my CarRequest class: ...


1

Justin's way will work fine. If the event number is indexed in all columns I'd suggest the following: Create a view like the following Select 'Type1' as EventType, event_number_id from event1 union all Select 'Type2' as EventType, event_number_id from event2 union all Select 'Type3' as EventType, event_number_id from event3 ...


1

If you just want to determine which subcategory table an event relates to in a single query, you'd need to join the event table to each of the subcategory tables. That may not be the most efficient query to run constantly, however SELECT e.event_number_id, (case when sc1.event_number_id IS NOT NULL then 'SC1' when sc2.event_number_id ...


1

EDIT: Hold on! I found out that this algorithm is slightly biased! Only use it if you don't really care about this. Using part of the Fisher-Yates shuffling algorithm, I made an extension on CollectionType to return an Array of n randomly selected elements from the collection. Works with any type of collection (see examples). Complexity is O(n). If n is ...


0

You don't need to redefine the u1 and u2 nodes. Just reuse the identifiers and MERGE the relationship : LOAD CSV with headers FROM "file:///C:/Users/user/Desktop/neo4j help/calling.csv" AS csvLine MERGE (u1:Person { number:(csvLine.A), name:(csvLine.name_A)}) MERGE (u2:Person { number:(csvLine.B), name:(csvLine.name_B)}) MERGE (u1)-[c:CALLED]->(u2) ...


1

EDIT: amended answer to deal with case where there are not 3 different values. In which case fewer are returned. Using Swift 2 with Xcode 7 beta 6 Since I am unclear how the array is declared here are 2 different possible versions. The idea is the same in each case. // in this version the array is declared as follows: let myArray01 = [["Apple",1], ...


-1

You can use the Data structure for this. Map<String, Integer> newMap = new HashMap<String, Integer>(); List<Integer> valueList = new ArrayList<Integer>(3); for (Map.Entry<String, Integer> entryMap : map.entrySet()) { if (!valueList.contains(entryMap.getValue()) && valueList.size() < 3) ...


0

If your elements are hashable, you can use a Set. import Foundation extension CollectionType where Generator.Element : Hashable, Index == Int { func sample(n: Int) -> Set<Generator.Element> { var result = Set<Generator.Element>() while result.count < n { let i = Int(arc4random_uniform(UInt32(count))) ...


0

You can add a new formula for unique record count =IF(COUNTIF($A$2:A2,A2)>1,0,1) Now you can use a pivot table and get a SUM of unique record count. This solution works best if you have two or more rows where the same value exist, but you want the pivot table to report an unique count.


0

When you use a StructuredProperty, all of the entities that type are stored as part of the containing entity - so when you fetch your bundle, you have already fetched all of the questions. If you stick with this way of storing things, iterating to check in code is the solution.


3

Numpy supports vectorized indexing, see "Integer array indexing". In practice, this means you can do: a, b = numpy.unique(Array_1, return_index=True) c = Array_2[b]


0

If MultiPage1.SelectedItem.name = "Page3" Then Dim vt As Variant Dim et As Variant Dim tempmnth As Integer Dim tempsheetname As String Dim templastrow As Long Dim CurrentMnth As String CurrentMnth = Month(Date) ComboBox7.Clear ComboBox6.Value = "Year to Date" ' find all unique technicians year to date With ActiveWorkbook For ...


1

Use correct join method and count in the having clause. SELECT u.id, u.first_name, u.last_name, u.code, i.short_name FROM elaba.usr_users u INNER JOIN elaba.usr_user_occupations uo ON u.id = uo.user_id INNER JOIN elaba.cls_institutions i ON uo.institution_id = i.id INNER JOIN elaba.doc_document_authors da ON u.id = da.user_id INNER JOIN ...


0

**use .toString() for strings ** var givenvalues = [1,2,3,3,4,5,6]; var values = []; for(var i=0; i<givenvalues.length; i++) { if(values.indexOf(givenvalues[i]) == -1) { values[values.length] = givenvalues[i]; } }


0

I finally found what the acutal problem was. The validation was processed only on the RegistrationType instance but not on the UserType within. To make sure that the validation also checks the constraints for the user I added the following code to my RegistrationType class : public function setDefaultOptions(Options ResolverInterface $resolver) { ...


0

Similar solution using forEach (& not forgetting to use get for item.get('property')): unique: Em.computed('model', function() { var uniqueObjects = []; this.get('model').forEach(function(item) { if (!uniqAccounts.isAny('property', item.get('property'))) { uniqueObjects.addObject(item); } }); return uniqueObjects; })


0

An other way would be to add it to the buildRules() function of your Table Model. public function buildRules(RulesChecker $rules) { $rules->add($rules->isUnique(['email'])); return $rules; }


0

I think of this as two aggregations. The first is at the AgentId/AccountId level to get the unique pairs. The second is at the AccountId level to get the number for a given account: select AccountId, count(*) from (select AgentId, AccountId from agents group by AgentId, AccountId having count(*) = 1 ) aa group by AccountId having ...


0

I guess you are looking for this query: SELECT AgentID, AccountID FROM dbo.Agents a WHERE EXISTS ( SELECT 1 FROM dbo.Agents a2 WHERE a.AccountID = a2.AccountID AND a.AgentID <> a2.AgentID ) GROUP BY AgentID, AccountID HAVING COUNT(*) = 1 Demo It returns all rows which contain duplicate AccountID but where the combination of AgentID ...


-1

Array.prototype.unique=function(){ var cr=[]; this.forEach(function(entry) { if(cr.indexOf(entry)<0){ cr.push(entry); }else{ var index = cr.indexOf(entry); if (index > -1) { cr.splice(index, 1); } } }); return cr; }


0

An alternative solution using dplyr and tidyr: library(tidyr) library(dplyr) dt = data.frame(Conversion = c("A1","Null","A1","A3"), Lead = c(1,0,1,1), Week = c("2015-25","2015-25","2015-25","2015-26")) dt %>% filter(Conversion != "Null") %>% group_by(Week, Conversion) %>% summarise(Lead = sum(Lead)) %>% ...


2

I would recommend dropping unnecessary levels in order to not mess the output, and then run a simple table and addmargins combination DF <- droplevels(DF[DF$Conversion != "Null",]) addmargins(table(DF[c("Week", "Conversion")]), 2) # Conversion # Week A2323 A25177 A3 Sum # 2015-25 0 2 1 3 # 2015-26 0 1 0 1 # 2015-27 ...


1

First, let's consider how to remove all words that are not duplicated by another word within distance 3 of them. You could determine whether each word matches the word with difference d from it with: matches <- function(words, d) { words <- as.character(words) if (d < 0) { words == c(rep("", -d), head(words, d)) } else { words == ...


2

The match operator %in% is very helpful. !test %in% test[duplicated(test)]


1

Okay, Sorry if i made an issue, but i found an answer, after implementing a = {(1,2),(3,5),(4,4),(5,7)} b = {(1,3),(4,4),(3,5),(3,5),(5,6)} print(a.symmetric_difference(b)) # {(1, 2), (1, 3), (5, 6), (5, 7)} Suggested in the first question i asked, i went to google and searched what does symmetric_difference does and if there is any ...


0

Just about any bulk operation will beat a loop involving worksheet cells. You might be able to trim the time down a bit by performing all of the calculations in memory and only returning the values back to the worksheet en masse when it is complete. Sub is_a_dupe() Dim v As Long, vTMP As Variant, vUNQs As Variant, dUNQs As Object Debug.Print Timer ...


0

I used the technique from Reliable method to get machine's MAC address in C# to come up with a list of the devices on my machine. Status NetworkInterfaceType Speed GetPhysicalAddress() Description 0 Down Wireless80211 0 XXXXXXXXXXXX Realtek RTL8188CUS Wireless LAN 802.11n USB Slim Solo 1 Down ...


0

I'm not sure how well this will work with 50000 values, but it goes through ~1500 in about a second. Sub unique() Dim myColl As New Collection Dim isDup As Boolean Dim myValue As String Dim r As Long On Error GoTo DuplicateValue For r = 1 To Sheet1.UsedRange.Rows.Count isDup = False 'Combine the value of the 2 cells ...


2

This code ran on over 130,000 rows successfully in less than 3 seconds. Adjust the column letters to fit your dataset. Sub tgr() Const colName As String = "A" Const colWeek As String = "B" Const colOutput As String = "C" Dim ws As Worksheet Dim rngData As Range Dim DataCell As Range Dim rngFound As Range Dim collUniques As ...


0

One approach is to sort by Name and Week. Then you can determine Unique for any row by comparing with the previous row. If you need to preserve the order, you could first write a column of Index numbers (1, 2, 3, ...) to keep track of order. After calculating Unique, sort by Index to restore the original order. The whole process could be done manually ...


1

For the second example (for the first, just remove the Birth.Year): library(dplyr) example_data %>% group_by(Date, Birth.Year) %>% mutate(special_sum = sum(Special_Balance), total_loan_exposure = n( )) %>% distinct(Name, Total_Balance) %>% summarise(Total_balance_sum = ...


2

I'm a little unclear on what you may be asking for, but does this do what you'd like?: (just for the first example) example_data %>% group_by(Date, Name) %>% summarise( total_loan_exposures=n(), total_SpecialPerson=sum(Special_Balance,na.rm=TRUE), total_balance_sumPerson=Total_Balance[1])%>% ungroup() %>% ...


0

To get the total length of the list, iterate through the rows using a loop and add each integer to a Python list using list.append(x) with the condition that if x not in list to get rid of the duplicates. Then, sort the list using list.sort(). Finally, do len(list). To get the top 5 most purchased items, again iterate through the rows using a loop, but ...


0

Assuming that you dataset is a csv file or a text file. from collections import Counter with open(path, "r") as fp: raw = fp.readlines() purchases = [item for line in raw for item in line.split()] print "Unique ids: %s" %(len(set(purchases)) print "Most purchased ids:" %(",".join([ item[1] for item in Counter(purchases).most_common(5)])) The above ...


3

This should do it: from collections import Counter items = Counter() with open('data_file.txt', 'r') as f: for line in f: items.update(line.split()) print("Total Unique Items: {0}".format(len(items))) for item, count in items.most_common(5): print("Item {0} was purchased {1} times".format(item, count)) Yes, it's that short :).


0

A bit late to the party, but very fast (30 ms here) ... #include <stdio.h> #define COUNT 9 /* this buffer is global. intentionally. ** It occupies (part of) one cache slot, ** and any reference to it is a constant */ char ten[COUNT+1] ; unsigned rec(unsigned pos, unsigned mask); int main(void) { unsigned res; ten[COUNT] = 0; res = ...


0

iterative version that uses bits extensively note that array can be changed to any type, and set in any order this will "count"the digits in given order For more explaination look at my first answer (which is less flexible but much faster) http://stackoverflow.com/a/31928246/2963099 In order to make it iterative, arrays were needed to keep state at each ...



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