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6

The reason why you can not create the instance of your Foo class is because it is abstract. There is no mechanism in Java that could create instance of an abstract class. To test abstract class you need to define new class that will extend Foo. This mean that the default constructor will be invoked.


5

First of all, each test should only have one assertion (unless the other validates the real one) e.q. if you want to assert that all elements of a list are distinct, you may want to assert first that the list is not empty. Otherwise you may get a false positive. In other cases there should only be one assert for each test. Why? If the test fails, it's name ...


3

Both will work of course, but I'd recommend implementing __eq__ because: It's low cost / doesn't take very much work Your tests will be easier to read if you're returning to them at some point in the future (or if someone else has to work with them) It's good future-proofing: the __eq__ method can be inherited, and if you've already had need to assess ...


3

Multi-modules are good, but you start creating modules and more modules and your list of dependencies starts to grow up and you end having to load modules in a lot of places and it gets hairy soon (In my experience). At the end of the day, Angular will load all of them so Angular itself doesn't care that much. A single module is a good idea too. For ...


3

Use InternalsVisibleToAttribute. You can modify your AssemblyInfo.cs for example: [assembly: InternalsVisibleTo("Tests.Project")]


3

markTestIncomplete throw special exception, witch end the test. Checks for 'expects' in mocks are skipped. public static function markTestIncomplete($message = '') { throw new PHPUnit_Framework_IncompleteTestError($message); }


3

If you need common test fixtures for a number of different test cases, it's perfectly fine to use an abstract base class for your unit tests. For example, small-scale integration tests using Spring will often use a base class that sets up the test runner and context and then add the specific components they're testing.


3

To pick a side, I'd say mocking is just fine and is less work than faking. But to voice an opinion - without trying to be awkward - I'd say... neither. Consider how much value is being added by a test which goes through your Index action without hitting a real repository - the vast majority of the code you're testing is in Linq and AutoMapper, both of ...


3

An alternative to inheritance is delegation, as mentioned by Alan Stokes. A good way to make use of this in junit is: use Rules. Some are provided, but you can rather easy create your own set of rules. The major benefit we have experienced is that you can cherry pick the common features you want to have. Sometimes you just want a tiny bit of the common ...


3

The message is not produced by the test code you posted. It simply says that the test expected the string "str", but got "str " instead (i.e. there is an additional space at the end of the string that should not be there).


3

You are confusing boolean primitives with Boolean Objects. primitives like boolean cannot be null and boolean is auto-initialized to false.


3

You can check if myFunction() raises a specific exception: try: self.assertFalse(myFunction()) except SpecificException: pass In this case if myFunction() raises SpecificException it would be silently ignored. In other words, you would see the test failing in two cases: either myFunction() raises the exception you are not waiting for, or the ...


2

Using catch-exception library, recommended way is to use the builder pattern: import com.google.common.base.Supplier; // Google Guava Supplier<MyClass> builder = new Supplier<MyClass>() { @Override public MyClass get() { return new MyClass(); } }; verifyException(builder).get(); If you are using JUnit 4 for unit testing, you ...


2

As some comments have echoed, structuring your tests in this manner is probably a design flaw in the tests themselves and you should consider restructuring them. However, if you want to do this and rely on the fact that the test runner you are using executes them in an alphabetical (seemingly) order then I suggest the following. Similar to what @Matthias ...


2

This won't work as you have it, because the b in your test is a different instance than the b in your A class. Also bear in mind that you shouldn't be mocking your class under test. I wrote a summary in another answer, but suffice to say that you should use a real A and a mock B in a test that's supposed to test A. You can insert your replacement B ...


2

Distinctions between NiceMock and StrictMock only come into play if there are no expectations set on the method. But you you have told Google Mock to expect a single call to command with the argument "QUIT". When it sees the second call, it complains. Maybe you meant this: EXPECT_CALL(testMock, command("STAT")).Times(1).WillOnce(Return("+OK 1 2\r\n")); ...


2

That change again in 0.12.2 http://tools.android.com/tech-docs/new-build-system Move unzipped aar back in each project as a temporary fix for a possible race condition. So you have to change the dependency back: unitTestCompile fileTree(dir: "$project.buildDir/intermediates/exploded-aar/", include:"**/classes.jar") (PS: do not know if is it the ...


2

The following test will pass with Grails 2.1.0 A controller: // grails-app/controllers/demo/MyController.groovy package demo class MyController { def settingSession() { session.band = 'King Crimson' } } A unit test: // test/unit/demo/MyControllerTests.groovy package demo import grails.test.mixin.* import org.junit.* ...


2

The code is not using unittest.main. You need to check the result using TestResult.wasSuccessful and call sys.exit manually. import sys .... ret = not runner.run(suite).wasSuccessful() sys.exit(ret)


2

Try this: public class FakeDbSet<T> : IDbSet<T> where T : class { private Func<T, object[], bool> _findSelector private readonly HashSet<T> data; private readonly IQueryable query; public FakeDbSet(Func<T, object[], bool> findSelector) { _findSelector = findSelector; data = new ...


2

Assuming you've only modified the standard library without any C code changes, try adding the lib/ directory to the load-path variable explicitly before running the tests. ruby -I lib/ test/matrix/test_matrix.rb


2

According to testing-in-python mailing list: The problem is with what you're yielding as the test callable. The "functions" in nose.tools are actually bound methods of a singleton unittest.TestCase. You can't safely yield them directly as test callables, because to nose they look like what they are, and therefore nose tries to run the test case ...


2

I find it easier to use actual promises for mocked services as it removes a lot of nested functions and is a lot easier to read. Relevant snippets ($q needs to be injected in beforeEach): deferred = $q.defer(); spyOn(login, 'login').andReturn(deferred.promise); ... deferred.reject({ ... }); After resolving or rejecting the promise you need to call ...


2

This is a known issue and mentioned in the Beta 4 release notes. You might want to hold off changing your designs until more information is provided. We're aware that our access control design isn't great for unit testing (and this was in the release notes), we're evaluating the situation to see what we can do. -- Chris Lattner A limitation of ...


1

First, you should state the the error you are getting is at compile-time not run-time. The issue is that Double is not a super of Object. So you call assertThat(someObject, someDoubleMatcher) doesn't meet the required signature at compile time. This will however work fine at runtime because the Matcher will check for type. Could options... // cast expected ...


1

In theory, it should be possible to achieve this with your own Test Extension (derived from TestClassExtensionAttribute), which you would use instead of the standard [TestClass] attribute. It's a bit challenging as it requires deployment/registration of your test extension (read "Extending the Visual Studio Unit Test Type, part 1"). This will give you ...


1

Managed to figure it out. Here is what I came up with: 'use strict'; describe('module: welcome', function () { var Welcome; beforeEach(function() { module('welcome', function($provide) { $provide.value('Welcome', { go: jasmine.createSpy('go') }); }); inject(function (_Welcome_) { Welcome = _Welcome_; }) ...


1

The assert keyword is disabled by default for the Java VM (see http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E19683-01/806-7930/6jgp65ikq/index.html). Different Java tools may or may not be configured to enable assertions by default. Eclipse currently does NOT enable assertions by default when running JUnit tests. (See the discussion on ...


1

are these, authentication.tests, python packages? Is this on Unix? see maybe related here: http://sonarqube.15.x6.nabble.com/Python-coverage-information-not-showing-up-in-Sonar-td5005729.html Btw, I have the same issue, can display test coverage, but not unit tests stats... Looking into PythonXunitSensor's code, looks like it is failing finding ...


1

__dict__ and inheritance don't play well together in this regard. If you want to compare something and really be sure that the comparison makes sense, then I would say implement eq or cmp on the class.



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