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3

This sed should work: sed -i.bak -E 's/(^|,)[[:blank:]]+/\1/g; s/[[:blank:]]+(,|$)/\1/g' file.csv This will remove leading spaes, trailing spaces and spaces around comma. Update: Here is an awk command to do the same: awk -F '[[:blank:]]*,[[:blank:]]*' -v OFS=, '{ gsub(/^[[:blank:]]+|[[:blank:]]+$/, ""); $1=$1} 1' file


3

A shellglob pattern is not the same as a regex. Try 'find -regex' instead.


2

include <string.h>; memset() is usually a macro and not a symbol in the standard libraries. EDIT: although not called explicitly, the compiler might call it for char user_name[IDLEN]=""; and the other string variables. You should compile with '-W -Wall' to detect such issues.


1

In egrep (or, preferably, grep -E), the | is a metacharacter, whereas in plain grep it is a plain (non-meta) character. The |F$ term in egrep looks for an empty string or F at the end of line; it finds an empty string on every line. The same term in grep looks for a |F at the end of line. To look for that with egrep, you'd need to escape the metacharacter ...


1

This generally happens when the program in question checks to see if it is conncted to a terminal and does something different for terminal vs non-terminal. The easiest way to get around this and capture the output anyways is to use script: script -c "./program" /dev/stdout | grep -v "I dont wan't to see logs like this!" | tail -f script will run the ...


1

I modified my code from char user_name[IDLEN]=""; char pass1[IDLEN]=""; char pass2[IDLEN]=""; to char user_name[IDLEN]; char pass1[IDLEN]; char pass2[IDLEN]; and it worked like a charm! :)


1

This is the way you achieve your user case using wget in unix. # Log in to the server. This can be done only once. wget ‐‐cookies=on ‐‐save-cookies cookies.txt ‐‐keep-session-cookies ‐‐post-data ‘user=un&password=password’ http://example.com/file.zip # Now grab the file using below wget --no-check-certificate --load-cookies cookies.txt \ ...


1

According to ISO/IEC 9899:201x redefining an reserved identifier like printf results in undefined behaviour: 7.1.3.2 ... If the program declares or defines an identifier in a context in which it is reserved (other than as allowed by 7.1.4), or defines a reserved identifier as a macro name, the behavior is undefined. So like ...


1

To remove leading blank chars with sed: $ sed -E 's/(^|,) +/\1/g' file 123,ste hen,456,out put With GNU awk: $ awk '{$0=gensub(/(^|,) +/,"\\1","g")}1' file 123,ste hen,456,out put With other awks: $ awk '{sub(/^ +/,""); gsub(/, +/,",")}1' file 123,ste hen,456,out put To remove blank chars before and after the values with sed: $ sed -E 's/ *(^|,|$) *...


1

awk is your friend. Input $ cat 38609590.txt Ted Winter, Evelyn Salt, Peabody Ulrich, Ethan Hunt, Wallace James Bond, Q, M (blank line) Script $ awk '/^$/{next}{sub(/^[[:blank:]]*/,"");gsub(/[[:blank:]]*,[[:blank:]]*/,",")}1' 38609590.txt Output Ted Winter,Evelyn Salt,Peabody Ulrich,Ethan Hunt,Wallace James Bond,Q,M Note This one removes the ...


1

you can try this; awk -F '|' -v fields=13 '{c+=NF; s=(s?s OFS:"") $0} c>=fields{print s; s=""; c=0}' yourfile.csv user@host:/tmp$cat test 1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9|10|11|12|13 1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9|10|11|12|13 1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9|10|11|12|13 1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9|10|11 |12|13 1|2|3|4|5|6|7|8|9|10| 11|12|13 user@host:/tmp$ awk -F"|" -v fields=13 '{f+=NF; str=(str?str ...


1

If examining the first line is sufficient, something like perl -ne 'exit ($_ =~ /\r$/)' file You could do the same in Bash; lffile () { local REPLY read -r <"$1" case $REPLY in *$'\r') return 1;; *) return 0;; esac } This requires the $'\r' C-style strings of Bash >= 3.x. If you can reliably and portably embed a literal carriage return ...



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