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All in awk awk 'x{x=x"\n"$0}/Name/{x=$0}END{print x}' file


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Through sed, tac file | sed -n '0,/Name/p' | tac


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You can use tac twice with awk: tac file | awk '{print} /Name/{exit}' | tac Name Peter


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perl -i~ -pe '$_ .= "${1}18$2\n" if /(Function_map\(var) 33 (,[ ][0-9.]+\);)/x' input Explanation: -p processes the file line by line -i~ changes the file "in place", creates a filename~ backup if the regular expression matches, everything before 33 is stored in $1, and everyting after it goes to $2; and those results with 18 in the middle are appended ...


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execute: shopt -s extglob after that do: mv !(20150328) "destination"


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Try this simple one. mv !(20150328) archieve


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find with the -name parameter and the ! negation operator: find . -type f ! -name 20150328 -exec mv {} archieve \; The {} matches the file just found, and the escaped semi-colon terminates the exec'ed command.


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You haven't made it clear, despite specific questions, whether you require the file name or the file contents to contain sorted. Here are both solutions First, chdir to the directory you're interested in. If you really need a one-liner for whatever reason then it is pointless to put the chdir inside the program. cd BADnew Then you can either unlink all ...


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If you got a access denied, it may mean that you have no permission to visit something. So you may try as this: sudo yourScript By the way, please give us the full error message.


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You must create at least the database and possibly the empty table. Then use a command like the one below which creates the table and inserts data (your -cc parameter only creates the table and doesn't import data). dbf2mysql -U root -P *** -t test_table -h localhost -d testdatabase -c AUSLIEFERUNG.DBF


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You could also do this with Awk by splitting and sorting ARGV: awk 'BEGIN { for(i=1; i<=ARGC-1; i++) { if(i > 1) { j=i-1 split(ARGV[i], curr, "_") split(ARGV[j], last, "_") if (curr[2] < last[2]) { tmp=ARGV[i] ARGV[i]=ARGV[j] ARGV[j]=tmp ...


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You can use the rename command. To remove the last four characters (abcdefghijklmnopq.txt to abcdefghijklm.txt): rename 's/(.?+).{4}\.txt$/$1.txt/' *.txt To remove everything except the first three characters (abcdefghijklmnopq.txt to abc.txt): rename 's/(.{3}).*/$1.txt/' *.txt If you want this operation to be performed for all .txt files within ...


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If your files are not sorted, you can sort them using the sort command. Note that this command does not sort the file in-line, but prints the sorted version of file on stdout. bash has a feature called process substitution. The stdout (or stdin as required) of the process is used as a file handle in /dev/fd/xxx & passed to the process. (diff in example ...


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You could try using a for-loop and adding the files one by one (the -v sorts the files correctly when the numbers are not zero-padded) for i in $(ls -v files_*.txt) do cat $i >> ../all_files.txt done or more convenient in a single line: for i in $(ls -v files_*.txt) ; do cat $i >> ../all_files.txt ; done


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Control/Q is ASCII XON (transmission on), normally used as part of your terminal's flow control. You can usually enter it in vi by prefixing that with a control/V. If you type stty -a on the command-line, that shows the characters which are assigned to these special functions. For example: > stty -a speed 38400 baud; rows 40; columns 80; line = 0; ...


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a=$(cat test.xml) b=${a//sheet0/whatever_you_want} echo "$b" > test.xml or in a loop: for ((x=0;x<=10;x++)) do a=$(cat test.xml) b=${a//sheet$x/whatever_you_want$x} echo "$b" > test.xml done This loops through the sheet names and replaces them with whatever you want. As far as I can tell, this works for .xml, but not .xls or .xlsx ...


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The screen program creates two processes to manage the pseudo-terminal and the user's display. One end of the pseudo-terminal is connected to the actual terminal, and the other is connected to shells which are run within screen. Any program using pseudo-terminals (such as a terminal emulator) does this. screen (the parent process) SCREEN (the child ...


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Invoking screen from within the screen window would not create new screen sessions. Instead, only new screen windows are created (just like ctrl-a c) and the new screen windows are running in the same screen session. You can verify this by pressing ctrl-a w. But you can force it to create new screen sessions, for example, with screen -S session-name. A ...


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If your filenames are free from any special characters or white-spaces, then other answers should be easy solutions. Else, try this rename based approach: $ ls files_*.txt files_101_200.txt files_1_100.txt $ rename 's/files_([0-9]*)_([0-9]*)/files_000$1_000$2/;s/files_0*([0-9]{3})_0*([0-9]{3})/files_$1_$2/' files_*.txt $ ls files_*.txt files_100_100.txt ...


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You can use printf sort and pipe that to xargs cat: printf "%s\0" f*txt | sort -z -t_ -nk2 | xargs -0 cat > ../all_files.txt Note that whole pipeline is working on NULL terminated filenames thus making sure this command even works foe filenames with space/newlines etc.


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The default sorting behavior of cat file_* is alphabetical, rather than numeric. List them in numerical order and then cat each one, appending the output to some file. ls -1| sort -n |xargs -i cat {} >> file.out


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Let me try it out, but I think that this will work: ls file*.txt | sort -n -t _ -k2 -k3 | xargs cat The idea is to take your list of files and sort them and then pass them to the cat command. The sort uses several options: -n - use a numeric sort rather than alphabetic -t _ - divide the input (the filename) into fields using the underscore character ...


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You want to use read in a loop in your script. While you can source a file, it doesn't work if there are spaces surrounding the = sign. Here is a way to handle reading the file: #!/bin/sh # test for required input filename if [ ! -r "$1" ]; then printf "error: insufficient input or file not readable. Usage: %s property_file\n" "$0" exit 1 fi # ...


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I became master in multithreading in C++ from below reference. There explained the concept, concurrency, passing arguments to threads very nicely. https://www.tutorialcup.com/cplusplus/multithreading.htm


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cmd = "depndnt setup_links:"+pkg+",host="+hostName p = pexpect.spawn('/bin/bash -c "%s"'%cmd) p.expect ('sudo password:') print(p.before) print(p.match) print(p.after) p.sendline ('mypassword') p.expect(pexpect.EOF) print(p.before) I am having the same output again but the command seems ...


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If I may hope that you are flexible enough to rename Excel sheets from the command-line and not necessarily using only shell (e.g Bash) constructs then a lot can be accomplished with the use of Python modules for Excel files. See: here.


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Your tar might not be able to handle .xz files. According tothis link you can try to install xz-utils and use the -J flag: tar -C /path/to/output -xJv


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.xz is not .gz. GNU tar apparently recognises XZ format; but OS X does not use GNU tools. I found this quote: Without installing anything, a TAR archive can be created with XZ compression using the tar program with the undocumented --xz argument.


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It's still not entirely clear what you want, but perhaps this will get you started - and the question Etan Reisner has linked to is worth checking out for general information. #!/usr/bin/env bash file="$1" awk -F'[:,]' -v f1=$2 -v f2=$3 -v f3=$4 -v f4=$5 \ '{ print "f1 + f2 =", $f1 + $f2 }' "$file" This defines awk variables f1, ... based on shell ...


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Try: find /where -type f -name \* -print0 | xargs -0 grep -lZ sorted | xargs -0 echo rm #can search for specific ^^^ names ^^^^^^ ^^^^ # what should contain the file | # remove the echo if satisfied with the result + The above: the find searches ...


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the core module File::Find will recursively traverse all the subdirectories and perform a subroutine on all files found perl -MFile::Find -e 'find( sub { open $f,"<",$_; unlink if grep /sorted/, <$f> }, "BADnew")'


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It can be done using find and grep combination: find BADnew -type f -exec grep -q sorted {} \; -exec rm {} \; Second -exec command will be executed only if return code for first one is zero. You can do dry run: find BADnew -type f -exec grep -q sorted {} \; -exec echo {} \;


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First need to find which user running https / apache2 server ps -aux | grep apache2 Most of times apache or www-data comes We need to set this user chown -R www-data:www-data /var/www/html Then file permission should be 644 and folder 755 we can do that using find command find /var/www/html -type f -not -perm 644 -exec chmod 644 {} \; find ...


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The permissions say you can only read/write to the file, but not execute: chmod +x Unlocker.Linux32 Unlocker.Linux64


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I'd say "access denied" (EACCES) does not indicate a missing file (ENOENT) but insufficient access rights to the path or parts of it. From man realpath: ERRORS EACCES Read or search permission was denied for a component of the path prefix. [...] ENOENT The named file does not exist. And to answer your question: Is there a realpath ...


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This is not an infinite loop. It's a loop with the exit condition in the middle: http://lxr.linux.no/#linux+v3.9/fs/select.c#L482 This is a very common idiom in C. It's called "loop and a half" and there's a simple pseudocode example here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/10767975/388520 which clearly illustrates why you would want to do this. (That question ...


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This can also be done with basic shell scripting using Solaris 10 ksh: previousNMonth() { y=$(echo $1|sed 's/..$//') m=$(echo $1|sed 's/^....//') m=$((m-$2)) while [ $m -lt 1 ]; do m=$((m+12)); y=$((y-1)); done printf "%04d%02d\n" $y $m } $ previousNMonth 201308 13 201207 If you are using Solaris 11, here is a ksh93 version which is pure ...


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It's simple. Try using awk like: awk -F':' '{sum+=$3} END {print sum}' myfile.txt Here -F is delimeter where we say fields are delimeted with colon ":" present in file myfile.txt We add $3 value to sum. And once that's done, we print the value of sum.


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A simple awk one-liner command would do this job. $ awk -F: '{sum+=$3}END{print sum}' file 450 For each line, awk would add the column 3 value to the variable sum. Printing the variable sum at the end will give you the total count. -F: sets the Field Separator value to colon.


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Given there is the DateTime module installed or you can install modules from CPAN (at least into your home directory): #!/usr/bin/env perl use DateTime; my $in = $ARGV[0] or die "No input"; my ( $year, $month ) = ( $in =~ m/^(\d\d\d\d)(\d\d)$/ ) or die "Wrong format"; my $dt = DateTime->new( year => $year, month => $month ); $dt->subtract( ...


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Examples of One way char strCoordinates[101]; char *ptr; int coordinates[4]; while(fgets(strCoordinates, sizeof(strCoordinates), stdin) != NULL) { char *s = strCoordinates; for (int x = 0; x < 4; x++) { coordinates[x] = strtol(s, &ptr, 10); s = ptr; } printf("%d,%d,%d,%d\n", ...


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This might work for you (GNU sed): sed 's/\b\(.\B.\)\B\(.\)/\1(\2)/g' file This looks for the second non-word boundary from the start of a word boundary and surrounds the following character with parens.


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I don't think there is a native library - I couldn't find one. I think you've got 3 choices Shell out to the blkid utility Write a cgo interface to libblkid Trawl through the libblkid source and re-implement it in go 1 is very easy. 2 is harder. 3 might be easy depending on exactly which feature of blkid you want. strace blkid args and seem how many ...


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The answer is yes. Hard links cannot span file systems, soft links (symlinks) can. And this was not a question that is really about programming.


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In case you want to do with recursion. #include<stdio.h> #include<string.h> int GCD(int numbers[], int count) { if (count==1) return numbers[0]; int i, j, min, x, y; x = numbers[0]; y = numbers[1]; min = (x>y)?x:y; for(i=min;i>=1;--i){ if(x%i==0 && y%i==0){ int ...


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I've cleaned it up, this should work for you: Initialize every variable before you consider it up for calculation in your code. #include<stdio.h> #include<string.h> //Main Method int main(int argc, char *argv[]){ //Declared variables here and print statements int i,x,y,gcd; printf("Number of command line args is %d\n", argc); printf("The ...


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#!/bin/bash arr=$@ for i in $arr; do if [ ! -d $i ] then echo "The parameter $i is no a directory!" exit 1 fi done echo -n "Please give file you want to monitor: " read file_monitor a=1 while [ $a -eq 1 ]; do for i in $arr; do cd $i test -e $file_monitor && echo "The file has been created" && ...


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while ! test -e "$file_monitor"; do sleep 5; done But you are much better off using something like inotify to monitor the appropriate directories.


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You can have the sender sleep in a loop, so that the sender only wakes-up, checks for files to send, sends 1 file, then goes back to sleep. #include <unistd.h> unsigned int sleep(unsigned int seconds);


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To exit the loop, use break: test -e $file_monitor && echo "The file has been created!" && break I would prefer to break first, and echo after the loop, or as @mkemp6 suggested, directly use the test as the condition for the loop. To check the folders, simply loop through them, and check the file in each one. break [n] Exit from ...



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