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0

See Thinktecture.IdentityModel.Client.EpochTimeExtensions public static class EpochTimeExtensions { /// <summary> /// Converts the given date value to epoch time. /// </summary> public static long ToEpochTime(this DateTime dateTime) { var date = dateTime.ToUniversalTime(); var ticks = date.Ticks - new ...


1

The errors speak for themselves. Your include guard tries to test an invalid macro name, yesno.h. It should be yesno_h, to match the following definition. Your header tries to include itself, but as a system header. It shouldn't do that. You want something more like #ifndef yesno_h #define yesno_h // Return true if response is "yes", "y", or any ...


0

Use xargs: echo "10 20 30" | xargs ./my_program hello world xargs is a command on Unix and most Unix-like operating systems used to build and execute command lines from standard input. Commands such as grep and awk can accept the standard input as a parameter, or argument by using a pipe. However, others such as cp and echo disregard the ...


1

MAKEFILE This looks good to me. There are a couple of issues though. guess:yesno.o guess.o g++ guess yesno.o guess.o g++ needs the -o option to name the output file. It's the same syntax as if you'd run it in the command line. And I'd put a space after the colon. But I'm not sure if that's mandatory. guess.o: yesno.h yesno.o: yesno.h ...


0

I need help. I have some files (file 1, file 2 and file 4) example cat file1 file2 | sort -u file1 file2 > file 3 But I need file 3 - file 4 = file 5 How do I do it? Thanks a lot


0

You need to disable multicast loopback via setsockopt().


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-r option for sed allows regexps without backslashes sed -n -r 's/Failed to add (.*) to database/\1/p' filename


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This should work: for (( i=0; i<${#c[@]}; i++)); do printf '%d. %s\n' $((i+1)) "${c[$i]}" done


1

Starting with array c, here are three methods: Using cat -n The cat utility will number output lines: $ cat -n < <(printf "%s\n" "${c[@]}") 1 aaa 2 filename2 3 bbb 4 asdf Using bash This method uses shell arithmetic to number the lines: $ count=0; for f in "${c[@]}"; do echo "$((++count)). $f"; done 1. aaa 2. filename2 ...


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In 1985, individuals from companies throughout the computer industry joined together to develop the POSIX (Portable Operating System Interface for Computer Environments) standard, which is based largely on the UNIX System V Interface Definition (SVID) and other earlier standardization efforts. These efforts were spurred by the U.S. government, ...


-1

If you've got that much RAM, why not read it all into memory and use a regular expression library to search? It's a simple C program: #include <fcntl.h> #include <regex.h> ...


0

Grep is a search function in for most unix like systems. Like when you press control f or command f in a web browser, it just has many more options and works in the command line. grep is a command-line utility for searching plain-text data sets for lines matching a regular expression. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grep


0

Well, that just looks like you don't have sql in the path on your remote machine. That's probably because rsh, in its desire to be safe, limits the path to something like: /usr/bin:/usr/sbin You could confirm this with a command like: rsh otherbox -l username "/usr/bin/echo \$PATH" Easiest fix is probably to give the full file specification for sql ...


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You may try fs_usage tool which would show you system calls and page faults related to filesystem activity in real-time. For example: sudo fs_usage cmd_or_PID Alternatively use dtruss (as root with -fp PID or -fn cmd) to examine your process.


-1

text="(\*)" grep -o $text file | wc -l You can make it into a script which accepts arguments like this: script count: #!/bin/bash text="$1" file="$2" grep -o "$text" "$file" | wc -l Usage: ./count "(\*)" file_path


0

OK, I figure it out. I needed to add <resources> <resource> <directory>src</directory> <excludes> <exclude>**/*.java</exclude> </excludes> </resource> </resources> to my pom.xml


-1

This foo="Hello" foo="$foo"" World" Or foo="Hello" foo="$foo World" Or foo="Hello" foo+=" World"


3

You must provide the -m64 flag for the linker as well so it knows what type of binaries to expect.


0

PHYSTOP is a constant defined as 0xE000000 for performance reasons. if PHYSTOP is set higher, you will need to map all of that free memory using mappages. OSes today map free pages on the fly, however on xv6 we map them on OS initialisation. mapping 2GB is slow. note that you could change this value before compilation for a bigger virtual memory.


2

With sed: AMD$ sed -r 's/\bA | A$//g' File B C B C Here, we are removing A with a space. We cover the 2 possibilities (a. A at beginning or anywhere in between, b. A at end).


2

You can use this awk awk '{gsub(/\<A\>/,"");$1=$1}1' file B C B C The $1=$1 is used to clean up the output so it only has one space between word after the As are removed. If you do like double/triple spacing to be intact in lines that does not have A, use this: awk 'gsub(/\<A\>/,""){$1=$1}1' file B C B C It will only modify line with A ...


1

Your example works fine, if you compile it with gcc -m32 example.s. If you use a GAS/LD-combination, you cannot terminate it with ret. Use instead: pushl $0 call exit


0

Found the root cause of the issue. It was to do with the fact that an external database access (to sql server) was being made in the call stack and the SQL Server was blocking MDTC port number. Its now fixed.


0

try this oneliner, it will print first column from HTML table: grep -E "\<th\>|\<td\>" abc.html | awk -F "<th>|<td>" '{print $2}' | sed 's/<[^>]\+>/ /g' in file abc.html is your html code. output is here: system:/depot/scripts/sh # grep -Ew "\<th\>|\<td\>" abc.html | awk -F "<th>|<td>" '{print $2}' ...


1

Unless you distinguish between the parent and the child by checking fork()'s return code and applying different logic respectively, both the parent and the child will proceed identically by printing the line and exiting.


2

First of all, there is no order to forked processes. Child and parent execute more-or-less simultaneously, despite the fact that child is higher in source code than parent. Here, parent just happened to slap their hand on the standard output a bit faster than child. The main problem you are having is a deadlock. The parent is waiting for the child to say ...


0

I think you're making things too hard on yourself. Since you have the colon as a delimiter between name and numbers, use that as the delimiter for cut. No need for regular expressions, as long as everything after the colon are numbers. Try this: #!/usr/bin/env bash if [[ $# -ge 1 && -f $1 ]]; then filename=$1 else filename=/dev/stdin fi ...


0

Is it ok to use awk(1)? If it is, try something like this: echo 12: 1 2 3 | awk '{ sum=0; for(i=2; i<=NF; i++) sum += $i; print $1, sum }'


0

This is getting all of the line after the first character: numbers="${line[@]:1}" I think you want something more like: numbers=$(echo $line | cut -d ' ' -f 2-)


0

Depending on the tool you used to generate the JAR, it may have replaced your main class with something else that f.e. sets up the classpath and then calls your class. This happens a lot when generating fat JARs with all the dependencies. Do check the contents of the JAR, as it may contain other JARs in turn.


0

Your question is at very primary level, so the answer would also be as primary level as: cat abc.html | awk -F" " '{print $1}'


2

You should anchor the expression at the start of the line with the circumflex ^. (if your lines start with the card number, otherwise delete the ^ from the expression) There is no need to escape the hyphen within the character class (e.g. [\-] should be [-]. With that, try: grep -E "^3[4-6][0-9]{2}[-]([0-9]{4}[-]){2}[0-9]{3}" MYFILE.txt


1

Try the following regex: [3][4-6][0-9]{2}-([0-9]{4}-){2}[0-9]{3}


2

If you want robust in-place updating of your input files, use gniourf_gniourf's excellent ed-based answer If you have GNU sed and want to in-place updating with multiple files at once, use @potong's excellent GNU sed-based answer (see below for a portable alternative) Note: ed truly updates the existing file, whereas sed's -i option creates a temporary ...


0

"Do only one thing" is definitely one, but there are more: Do only one thing and do it well Output nothing on success (other than the result, of course) Use stdin for the input, stdout for the output, and stderr for errors Use non-zero exit codes to communicate failure With this in mind, here's what is, in my opinion, a more "unixy" "to-uppercase" ...


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The main principle behind *nix tools is do one thing, and do it well. Let's say I set out to create a *nix style tool that converted the input to uppercase. It's a trivial example, but that allows me to post the whole program here. Here's the source code: using System; using System.Diagnostics.Contracts; namespace Upperc { class Program { static ...


0

There are quite a few issues with your code. The one you're seeing is that you're not filling in the variable client properly: the clientsize parameter is used for both input and output by the recvfrom system call, so you need to initialise it to the size of the client structure: int clientsize = sizeof(struct sockaddr_in); Another issue is that you're ...


1

You have to use set -o pipefail See this related StackOverflow Question. Minimal example: #!/bin/bash trap handler ERR handler() { echo trapped ; } echo 1 false | : echo 2 set -o pipefail false | : Output: $ bash test.sh 1 2 trapped


0

This line is completely wrong, this path does not exist on your system with security. JAVA_HOME='/usr/bin/gij-4.7/opt/jdk/jdk1.7.0_75/bin/java' Chane your JAVA_HOME: JAVA_HOME='/opt/jdk/jdk1.7.0_75'


0

Instead of: JAVA_HOME='/usr/bin/gij-4.7/opt/jdk/jdk1.7.0_75/bin/java' Try this: JAVA_HOME='/usr/bin/gij-4.7/opt/jdk/jdk1.7.0_75'


6

You can use :mkview to save folds and such when you close a file - but you have to use :loadview next time you use the file. Further, you can automate this with .vimrc file. Add following to your vimrc. autocmd BufWinLeave *.* mkview autocmd BufWinEnter *.* silent loadview


1

With GNU awk: awk ' FNR==NR {if(FNR==14) x=$0;if(FNR==26) y=$0;next} FNR==14 {$0=y} FNR==26 {$0=x} {print} ' file file > file_with_swap


0

If you want to swap two lines, you can send it through twice, you could make it loop in one sed script if you really wanted, but this works: e.g. test.txt: for a in {1..10}; do echo "this is line $a"; done >> test.txt this is line 1 this is line 2 this is line 3 this is line 4 this is line 5 this is line 6 this is line 7 this is line 8 this is ...


4

First, get realpath(1) from GNU Coreutils. Then: $ realpath --relative-to=/User/foo/bar/source/assets/myscreen /User/foo/bar/gamethings/smallimages ../../../gamethings/smallimages


0

There surely is a .c file and it's a part of the Linux kernel. If you really want to see how it's done you can start unwinding it e.g. from here: http://lxr.free-electrons.com/source/block/genhd.c?v=3.8 Reading from procfs is not the worst method to get the stats, actually that's what it's made for. But if you want you can try using the iostat util instead ...


5

^@ is a representation of the null byte (character code 00). In a regular expression, it is typically denoted as \0 or \x00. Background details: ^@ is the character that you get by holding down Control while typing @. Traditionally, holding down Control modifies a character code by clearing the upper three bits (putting the character into the 0x00–0x1F ...


2

Instead of writing a regex in bash, I would do it with awk: echo 'ABC_DE_FGHI_10_JK_LMN.csv' | awk -F_ -v pos=4 '{print $pos}' or if you want the dot to also be a delimiter (requires GNU awk): echo 'ABC_DE_FGHI_10_JK_LMN.csv' | awk -F'[_.]' -v pos=4 '{print $pos}'


0

The accepted answer doen't actually answer the question of sorting on a specific range of absolute character positions, counting from the beginning of the line (which is position 1 as counted by sort). It is important to remember that for sort, field numbers refer to portions of text separated by the field separator, which is a non-blank to blank transition ...


2

If you want to edit a file, you can use ed, the standard editor. Your task is rather easy in ed: printf '%s\n' 14m26 26-m14- w q | ed -s file How does it work? 14m26 tells ed to take line #14 and move it after line #26 26-m14- tells ed to take the line before line #26 (which is your original line #26) and move it after line preceding line #14 (which is ...


2

Define your favorite directories in CDPATH environment variable. It's a colon-separated list of search paths available to the cd command. You should specify not a directory you want to switch but parent directory. Here is brief info about it: http://docstore.mik.ua/orelly/unix/upt/ch14_05.htm For example you have three directories you work with frequently: ...



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