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169

Compiling a C++ program takes place in several steps, as specified by 2.2 (credits to Keith Thompson for the reference): The precedence among the syntax rules of translation is specified by the following phases [see footnote]. Physical source file characters are mapped, in an implementation-defined manner, to the basic source character set ...


92

This error often means that some function has a declaration, but not a definition. Example: // A.hpp class A { public: void myFunc(); // Function declaration }; // A.cpp // Function definition void A::myFunc() { // do stuff } In your case, the definition cannot be found. The issue could be that you are including a header file, which brings in some ...


38

Class members: A pure virtual destructor needs an implementation. Declaring a destructor pure still requires you to define it (unlike a regular function): struct X { virtual ~X() = 0; }; struct Y : X { ~Y() {} }; int main() { Y y; } //X::~X(){} //uncomment this line for successful definition This happens because base class destructors are ...


25

Declared but did not define a variable or function. A typical variable declaration is extern int x; As this is only a declaration, a single definition is needed. A corresponding definition would be: int x; For example, the following would generate an error: extern int x; int main() { x = 0; } //int x; // uncomment this line for successful ...


23

I've been using static version of libcurl, and to link my program against it properly, I had to add definition: CURL_STATICLIB to build configuration of my project.


22

Failure to link against appropriate libraries/object files or compile implementation files Commonly, each translation unit will generate an object file that contains the definitions of the symbols defined in that translation unit. To use those symbols, you have to link against those object files. Under gcc you would specify all object files that are to be ...


19

Template implementations not visible. Unspecialized templates must have their definitions visible to all translation units that use them. That means you can't separate the definition of a template to an implementation file. If you must separate the implementation, the usual workaround is to have an impl file which you include at the end of the header that ...


19

Incorrectly importing/exporting methods/classes accross modules. (compiler specific) MSVS requires you to specify which symbols to export and import using __declspec(dllexport) and __declspec(dllimport). This dual functionality is usually obtained through the use of a macro: #ifdef THIS_MODULE #define DLLIMPEXP __declspec(dllexport) #else #define ...


18

It looks like the Makefile was not regenerated when you edited the .pro file. Run qmake and try again. You could also check if the deck.cpp is compiled or not; is there a deck.o in the build directory ?


17

The problem is you are not linking against the Ws2_32.lib library. To fix this you can add that to your additional dependencies tab of linker/Input settings for your project. Alternatively (as pointed out by SChepurin in the comments) you can add #pragma comment(lib, "Ws2_32.lib") to a source file of your project.


16

Symbols were defined in a C program and used in C++ code. The function (or variable) void foo() was defined in a C program and you attempt to use it in a C++ program: void foo(); int main() { foo(); } The C++ linker expects names to be mangled, so you have to declare the function as: extern "C" void foo(); int main() { foo(); } Equivalently, ...


16

I found another forum post, where somebody seems to have reported the same exact problem that you are having. Please check to see if you have _DEBUG defined either in your project settings (under C/C++ -- Preprocessor) or somewhere in your code (or include files). It looks as if std::vector thinks you are building a debug build, when you are in fact ...


16

There is also a .lib file: C:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows\v7.0A\Lib\ windowscodecs.lib


15

If your intent is for them to be simply place holders for child classes to implement, then make them pure virtual functions by ending with = 0. For example virtual void destroyDelayBuffer(void) = 0; This makes the method "abstract" so to speak. The C++ compiler will not look for an actual definition of the method but instead will force all derived ...


13

If all else fails, recompile. I was recently able to get rid of an unresolved external error in Visual Studio 2012 just by recompiling the offending file. When I re-built, the error went away. This usually happens when two (or more) libraries have a cyclic dependency. Library A attempts to use symbols in B.lib and library B attempts to use symbols from ...


13

Situation 1: You have the code for the constructor. So it builds the constructor into the object file. The constructor needs the address of the destructor to put into the virtual table because it can not find it the constructor can not be built. Situation 2: (inline constructor) The compiler decides it does not need to build the constructor (as it will be ...


9

The procedure I have followed in my post above has two issues: The ComplexTypes.cpp filename must be turned to ComplexTypes.cu so that nvcc could intercept the CUDA keywords __device__ and __host__. This has been pointed out by Talonmies in his comment. Actually, before posting, I was already changing the filename from .cpp to .cu, but the compiler was ...


8

Put this into your cpp: TVector Tball::Position(/* contructor params */); TVector Tball::Verlocity(/* contructor params */); This make the "space" for these member static variables.


8

undefined reference to WinMain@16 or similar 'unusual' main() entry point reference (especially for visual-studio). You may have missed to choose the right project type with your actual IDE. The IDE may want to bind e.g. Windows Application projects to such entry point function (as specified in the missing reference above), instead of the commonly used int ...


7

The order in which interdependent linked libraries are specified is wrong. The order in which libraries are linked DOES matter if the libraries depend on each other. In general, if library A depends on library B, then libA MUST appear before libB in the linker flags. For example: // B.h #ifndef B_H #define B_H struct B { B(int); int x; }; #endif ...


7

The library was changed to hide internal structures better. So what you need to do is this: typedef jmp_buf* (*png_set_longjmp_fnPtr)(png_structp png_ptr, png_longjmp_ptr longjmp_fn, size_t jmp_buf_size); png_set_longjmp_fnPtr mypng_set_longjmp_fnPtr = 0; Then when you dynamically do a LoadLibrary, do this: mypng_set_longjmp_fnPtr = ...


7

Check you are including all the source files within your solution that you are referencing. If you are not including the source file (and thus the implementation) for the class Field in your project it won't be built and you will be unable to link during compilation. Alternatively, perhaps you are using a static or dynamic library and have forgotten to ...


6

As others said, you need to provide a definition point for your static member. However, since it is a member of a template, the syntax is going to be a bit more complex then what was suggested before. If I'm not missing anything, it should look as follows template<typename K, typename V> shared_ptr<node<K,V> > node<K,V>::m_empty; ...


6

The "unresolved" methods are not methods at all. You left out the class name. Change: void createLaneArrays() to: void BowlingAlley::createLaneArrays() and do the same for the other 2. Then they will be part of the class. They are not automatically in the class just because they are in the same file as in C# or Java.


6

You are missing user32.lib try add this code after #includes #pragma comment(lib,"user32.lib")


6

Seems like your compilation was sucessfull. Only the linking did not work. Probably the linker is complaining because you defined the header of the method "acsEnumServerNames" but you did not provide an implementation of the method. Maybe you used a header-file but you did not provide the library to which the header belongs ? Find out to which pakage ...


6

You have a pointer to an sqlite3, so the right definition syntax would be sqlite3* foo::db = nullptr; or just sqlite3* foo::db; Note that you have to make it point to a valid sqlite3 object before de-referencing it.


6

You are trying to compile with /MD, which is probably the right choice, but some code (probably one of the libraries) was built with /MT, and you can't have it both ways in the same program. You need to figure out which library was built with /MT and rebuild it with /MD.


6

You only declared, but not defined the variable. Add a definition in a single implementation file. file 2.h extern CGraphWnd graph_wnd_sensor1D; // declarations file 2.cpp CGraphWnd graph_wnd_sensor1D; // definition


6

// does an arraySize have to be const always? is it so it doesnt channge after the array has been created? Yes, it has to be const, moreover, it must be a constant expression, which means its size must be known at compile-time (not at runtime). If you want to resize arrays, then the best is to use the standard container std::vector. Or use dynamically ...



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