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140

When you select a column with type ZEROFILL it pads the displayed value of the field with zeros up to the display width specified in the column definition. Values longer than the display width are not truncated. Note that usage of ZEROFILL also implies UNSIGNED. Using ZEROFILL and a display width has no effect on how the data is stored. It affects only how ...


77

One example in order to understand, where the usage of ZEROFILL might be intersting: In Germany, we have 5 digit zipcodes. However, those Codes may start with a Zero, so 80337 is a valid zipcode for munic, 01067 is a zipcode of Berlin. As you see, any German citizen expects the zipcodes to be displayed as a 5 digit code, so 1067 looks strange. In order to ...


70

Not all languages have the concept of unsigned ints. For example VB 6 had no concept of unsigned ints which I suspect drove the decision of the designers of VB7/7.1 not to implement as well (it's implemented now in VB8). To quote: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/12a7a7h3.aspx The CLS was designed to be large enough to include the language ...


51

It has little to do with rank of the type defined in 4.13. 4.13 defined internal rankings used to describe integral promotions and usual arithmetic conversions. They by itself do not directly affect overload resolution. Rankings relevant to overload resolution are defined in "13.3.3.1.1 Standard conversion sequences" and then used in "13.3.3.2 Ranking ...


46

It's a feature for disturbed personalities who like square boxes. You insert 1 23 123 but when you select, it pads the values 000001 000023 000123


40

int value can be -2147483648 these are 11 digits so the default display size is 11 unsigned int does not allow negative numbers so by default it need only display size 10 As the documentation below shows, the number of bits required to store SIGNED INT and UNSIGNED INT is the same, the range of storable numbers is merely shifted: Unsigned type can be ...


37

One possible aspect is that unsigned integers can lead to somewhat hard-to-spot problems in loops, because the underflow leads to large numbers. I cannot count (even with an unsigned integer!) how many times I made a variant of this bug for(size_t i = foo.size(); i >= 0; --i) ... Note that, by definition, i >= 0 is always true. (What causes this ...


36

It is usually a good idea to declare variables as unsigned or size_t if they will be compared to sizes, to avoid this issue. Compilers give warnings about comparing signed and unsigned types because the ranges of signed and unsigned ints are different, and when they are compared to one another, the results can be surprising. If you have to make such a ...


36

size_t is unsigned for historical reasons. On an architecture with 16 bit pointers, such as the "small" model DOS programming, it would be impractical to limit strings to 32 KB. For this reason, the C standard requires (via required ranges) ptrdiff_t, the signed counterpart to size_t and the result type of pointer difference, to be effectively 17 bits. ...


35

Your last approach seems promising. You can improve on that by manually considering the lowest bits of a and b: unsigned int average = (a / 2) + (b / 2) + (a & b & 1); This gives the correct results in case both a and b are odd.


29

One big factor is that it makes loop logic harder: Imagine you want to iterate over all but the last element of an array (which does happen in the real world). So you write your function: void fun (const std::vector<int> &vec) { for (std::size_t i = 0; i < vec.size() - 1; ++i) do_something(vec[i]); } Looks good, doesn't it? It ...


27

size_t is unsigned because negative sizes make no sense. (From the comments:) It's not so much ensuring, as stating what is. When is the last time you saw a list of size -1? Follow that logic too far and you find that unsigned should not exist at all and bit operations shouldn't be permitted either. – geekosaur More to the point: addresses, for reasons ...


24

It's not in the SQL standard, so the general urge to implement it is lower. Having too many different integer types makes the type resolution system more fragile, so there is some resistance to adding more types into the mix. That said, there is no reason why it couldn't be done. It's just a lot of work.


21

Section 6.3.1.8, Usual arithmetic conversions, of C99 details implicit integer conversions. If both operands have the same type, then no further conversion is needed. That doesn't count since they're different types. Otherwise, if both operands have signed integer types or both have unsigned integer types, the operand with the type of lesser ...


20

It seems like you are expecting int and unsigned int to be a 16-bit integer. That's apparently not the case. Most likely, it's a 32-bit integer - which is large enough to avoid the wrap-around that you're expecting. Note that there is no fully C-compliant way to do this because casting between signed/unsigned for values out of range is ...


20

The problem here is that an unsigned integer is never negative. Therefore, the loop-test: i >= 0 will always be true. Thus you get an infinite loop. When it drops below zero, it wraps around to the largest value unsigned value. Thus, you will also be accessing x[i] out-of-bounds. This is not a problem for signed integers because it will simply go ...


20

size_t r = 0; r--; const bool result = (r == -1); Strictly speaking, the value of result is implementation-defined. In practice, it's almost certain to be true; I'd be surprised if there were an implementation where it's false. The value of r after r-- is the value of SIZE_MAX, a macro defined in <stddef.h> / <cstddef>. For the comparison r ...


19

unsigned int average = low + ((high - low) / 2); EDIT Here's a related article: http://googleresearch.blogspot.com/2006/06/extra-extra-read-all-about-it-nearly.html


19

unsigned numbers can't overflow, but instead wrap around using the properties of modulo. For instance, when unsigned int is 32 bits, the result would be: (a * b) mod 2^32. As CharlesBailey pointed out, 253473829*13482018273 may use signed multiplication before being converted, and so you should be explicit about unsigned before the multiplication: ...


19

I'm not going to watch a video just to answer a question, but one issue is the confusing conversions which can happen if you mix signed and unsigned values. For example: #include <iostream> int main() { unsigned n = 42; int i = -42; if (i < n) { std::cout << "All is well\n"; } else { std::cout << ...


18

It's an unsigned integer - by definition its smallest possible value is 0. If you want some justification besides just common sense, the standard says: 6.2.6.2 Integer types For unsigned integer types other than unsigned char, the bits of the object representation shall be divided into two groups: value bits and padding bits (there need not be ...


18

In i > -1, the -1 is converted to unsigned int, resulting in the value UINT_MAX. i is never bigger than that value, so the loop body never executes. You might find that you can persuade your compiler to warn you about this: use of an always-true or always-false expression in a conditional context. But that still wouldn't help you if you'd written i > ...


18

According to the documentation, this number is merely the display width. For example, INT(4) specifies an INT with a display width of four digits. The display width does not constrain the range of values that can be stored in the column. Nor does it prevent values wider than the column display width from being displayed correctly. For example, ...


17

Your method is not correct if both numbers are odd eg 5 and 7, average is 6 but your method #3 returns 5. Try this: average = (a>>1) + (b>>1) + (a & b & 1) with math operators only: average = a/2 + b/2 + (a%2) * (b%2)


15

There is a bug, but it's not what you think. Here's the documentation for shr: If x is a negative integer, the shl and shr operations are made clear in the following example: var x: integer; y: string; ... begin x := -20; x := x shr 1; //As the number is shifted to the right by 1 bit, the sign bit's value replaced is //with 0 (all ...


14

Well, you just have to calculate the range for each case and find the lowest power of 2 that is higher than that range. For instance, in i), 3 decimal digits -> 10^3 = 1000 possible numbers so you have to find the lowest power of 2 that is higher than 1000, which in this case is 2^10 = 1024 (10 bits). Edit: Basically you need to find the number of possible ...


13

Yes, and the result is what you would expect. Let's break it down. What is the value of r at this point? Well, the underflow is well-defined and results in r taking on its maximum value by the time the comparison is run. std::size_t has no specific known bounds, but we can make reasonable assumptions about its range when compared to that of an int: ...


12

How many bits are necessary to address 32 bytes ? 5 (since 2^5==32). In other words log2(32). If the number in question (32) wasn't a power of two, you would need to round the answer up. What are the maximum and minimum unsigned integers that can be represented by 7 bits, 9 bits and 10 bits? The minimum unsigned int is always zero, regardless of ...


12

Arguments for TIMESTAMP It implicitly stores data in GMT time zone. No matter what your session time-zone is. Useful if you need to use different timezones. You can have automated timestamping columns using DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP or ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP (one column per table only until MySQL 5.6.5) You can use datetime function for date ...


12

In the first program, b=-5; assigns 251 to b. (Conversions to an unsigned type always reduce the value modulo one plus the max value of the destination type.) In the second program, b=5; simply assigns 5 to b, then c = (a - b); performs the subtraction 0-5 as type int due to the default promotions - put simply, "smaller than int" types are always promoted ...



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