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1

after all the coding errors were corrected, it compiled with no errors. note that no changes were made to the typedef statements. #include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> typedef unsigned char uchar; typedef unsigned int uint; uchar Myregister(uint); int main() { uint data = 819; printf("%c", Myregister(data)); return(0); } uchar ...


0

Okay, Let's go line by line.. 1 . unsigned int num1 = 3, num2 = -2; for num2 = -2 ; It will show as a positive integer of value of max unsigned integer - 1 (value depends on computer architecture and compiler). like if you assign num2 = X (say) and the stored value will be MAX_UNSIGNED_VALUE - (X-1). Basically It will assign the bit pattern representing ...


0

Assigning a negative number is the same as assigning 0 and subtracting that number. When this subtraction occurs, your number overflows and becomes huge; If x is the bigger number you can store, x + 1 = 0 (overflows and goes around in a loop), which means that when you perform 0 - 1 in an unsigned number, you're actually getting the biggest number you can ...


0

The problem was I never checked to see if first1 and last1 had values, so obviously in one (or several instances) one of them didn't causing the code to abort.


0

From DataInputStream.java public final int readUnsignedShort() throws IOException { int ch1 = in.read(); int ch2 = in.read(); if ((ch1 | ch2) < 0) throw new EOFException(); return (ch1 << 8) + (ch2 << 0); }


1

Use Format spcifier of unsigned int which is %u Now compile and run the code you will see the difference #include <stdio.h> int main(void) { signed int a = 5; unsigned int b = -5; printf("%d\n", a); printf("%u\n", b); return 0; }


3

You have to use correct format specifiers that to get the correct result using function printf. Write printf("%d\n", a); printf("%u\n", b); The function simply interpretates internal representations of data according to the format specifiers.


2

As far as I understand https://blogs.oracle.com/darcy/entry/unsigned_api, the unsigned support is not done by introducing a new type. The values are still stored in (signed) int variables but they provide methods to interpret the value as unsigned: To avoid dealing with the overhead of boxed values and to allow reuse of the built-in arithmetic operators, ...


0

Is there a way that I can still have 4294967295 in a varible? Yes. Use long. (To me, it sounds like you're overthinking it.)


10

You can view that integer as unsigned int by calling toUnsignedString(): int uint = Integer.parseUnsignedInt("4294967295"); System.out.println(Integer.toUnsignedString(uint)); You can also call some other methods that interpret that int as unsigned. For example : long l = Integer.toUnsignedLong(uint); System.out.println(l); // will print 4294967295 int ...


0

After experimenting some more I found the answer. The word "UNSIGNED" should come after "TINYINT" instead of before it. The field should be defined as follows: @Size(max = 3) @Column(name = "WorkingHours", columnDefinition="TINYINT(3) UNSIGNED default '40'") private Integer workingHours; I am not sure why this is, I have found this out only through trial ...


0

If it's auto incremented, as they usually are, it should be unsigned, otherwise you will get unexpected sequencing at the overflow point.


1

We use INT UNSIGNED or BIGINT UNSIGNED for all of our surrogate primary keys. We also use the name id for the column. There's nothing problematic (or necessarily evil) with negative values for an integer PRIMARY KEY, a signed integer would be fine as well. One issue to be aware of with an unsigned integer: the maximum value is LARGER than the maximum value ...


1

You can avoid thinking about it altogether: CREATE TABLE animals ( id SERIAL, name CHAR(30) NOT NULL ); (Which does create it as an unsigned int, and also adds the unique index and auto incrementing)


1

A correct way to write this code is: uint32_t fillThisNum(uint32_t a, uint32_t b, uint32_t c) { // mask out the bits we are not interested in a &= 0xFFFFFF; // save lowest 24 bits b &= 0xF; // save lowest 4 bits c &= 0xF; // save lowest 4 bits // arrange a,b,c within a 32-bit unit so that they do not overlap ...


1

Do the parameters have to be the same bit length as the function type, and must they be unsigned? No, the arguments and the return value can be different types. Can I assign an unsigned int to a signed int? (i.e. uint32_t a = int32_t b;) Yes, the value will be converted from a signed to an unsigned value. The bits in "b" will stay the ...


3

This is all about the C coercion rules. The expression 1-a is treated as an unsigned int, and results in an underflow. The compiler cannot remove the parentheses because you're mixing types. Consider your cases: return *(p + (1 - a)); /* equivalent */ Calculates 1-a first, but treats it as an unsigned int. This underflows the unsigned type, and ...


5

The problem is that in the expression 1 - a, the 1 gets promoted to unsigned int, so you have 1U - 2U which underflows to UINT_MAX. The take-home message here is that you always have to be very careful when mixing signed and unsigned ints in the same expression. Not that a good compiler may warn you about such usages, provided you have warnings enabled of ...


4

You are mistaken in your belief that max number for unsigned int is 65535. That hasn't been the case for most compilers since perhaps early days of windows 95 when we had 16-bit processors. The standards do NOT define the size of any integral type; they only define the relationship of the sizes between one another. (long long >= long >= int >= short >= ...


3

As shown in http://www.tutorialspoint.com/cprogramming/c_data_types.htm (and many other places), unsigned int can be 2 bytes or 4 bytes. In your case, you are using 4 bytes so the maximum is 4,294,967,295. The maximum you mention, 65535 corresponds to 2 bytes.


0

Updating the answer as gets() is deprecated. A hint to one of the approaches you can take to solve your problem. For the first part of you question, use fgets(). For the second part, use fgets() to get the entire input, break them into tokens using space as delimiters ( strtok() will do ) and use atoi() to get its integer value and store it in the array.


0

Unsigned integer is advantageous in that you store and treat both as bitstream, I mean just a data, without sign, so multiplication, devision becomes easier (faster) with bit-shift operations


0

The performance difference between signed and unsigned integers is actually more general than the acceptance answer suggests. Division of an unsigned integer by any constant can be made faster than division of a signed integer by a constant, regardless of whether the constant is a power of two. See ...



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