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1

This difference between unsigned and signed number is that one of the bit is used to indicate positive or negative number. So in your example you have 8 bits. If I treat is as signed, then I have 7 bits to work with: 2^7 000 0000 = 0 111 1111 = 127 001 1001 = 25 then the most significant bit cause the following calculation to occurred. (25 - 128) ...


4

This technique works for any size of integer, but I will use an 8-bit byte-sized integer to explain, because the numbers are smaller and easier to work with. An 8-bit type has 28 = 256 possible values. At a low level these are just bits. Signed vs unsigned is a matter of how we interpret those bits. When interpreted as an unsigned integer, they have a range ...


4

The FILETIME struct is defined as: typedef struct _FILETIME { DWORD dwLowDateTime; DWORD dwHighDateTime; } FILETIME, *PFILETIME; So, because Windows runs on little Endian, the layout of this struct is compatible with a 64 bit integer value. So, you can cast TFileTime to UInt64, do the arithmetic, and cast back. Like this: function ...


0

The org.apache.axis.types package has a UnsignedLong class. for maven: <dependency> <groupId>org.apache.axis</groupId> <artifactId>axis</artifactId> <version>1.4</version> </dependency>


-1

You can't use bitwise & with floating point numbers. Try this: m_buf.putFloat(nOffset, Float.valueOf(0xFFFFFFFF & number));


2

The IEEE 754 floating point representation has 1 bit reserved for the sign. There is no alternative representation that uses this bit as part of the mantissa or exponent. In other words, there is no "unsigned float". If all you want to do is to make sure you don't put any negative numbers in the buffer, just do m_buf.putFloat(nOffset, ...


0

Unsigned apps will be terminated despite iOS being jailbroken. The fix is, you can still sign with a certificate created by yourself or just fake sign with ldid. The following link explains it in detail. Link Link 2


5

Use the right type for the operations which you will perform. float wouldn't make sense for a counter. Nor does signed int. The normal operations on the counter are print and +=1. Even if you had some unusual operations, such as printing the difference in viewcounts, you wouldn't necessarily have a problem. Sure, other answers mention the incorrect ...


7

This guideline is extremely misleading. Blindly using int instead of unsigned int won't solve anything. That simply shifts the problems somewhere else. You absolutely must be aware of integer overflow when doing arithmetic on fixed precision integers. If your code is written in a way that it does not handle integer overflow gracefully for some given inputs, ...


0

No, according to this post on Amazon's forums: Re: https://forums.aws.amazon.com/message.jspa?messageID=573632 UNSIGNED-PAYLOAD can be used only with a query-string authentication. If you use Authorization header authentication, it cannot be used. As an option, you can use chunked transfer, so will have to calculate hashes for small chunks of data ...


0

In specific aspect, I agree with the guide due to the nature of unsigned type. unsigned int state; With the variable, state, we can assign any integer values like belows. state = 1; state = 2; state = 100; But we can also assign any negative values. state = -1; state = -2; I think it can be a problem in certain situation such as a large software ...


10

The Google rule is widely accepted in professional circles. The problem is that the unsigned integral types are sort of broken, and have unexpected and unnatural behavior when used for numeric values; they don't work well as a cardinal type. For example, an index into an array may never be negative, but it makes perfect sense to write abs(i1 - i2) to find ...


2

Google states that: "Some people, including some textbook authors, recommend using unsigned types to represent numbers that are never negative. This is intended as a form of self-documentation." I personally use unsigned ints as index parameters. int foo(unsigned int index, int* myArray){ return myArray[index]; } Google suggests: "Document that a ...


2

Yes, you could overflow. The difference of 2 unsigned integers can be as large as an unsigned integer and that won't fit in a signed integer (of the same type) [ unless you were to wrap around to negative, but pretty sure you don't want that]. you could easily verify with a test case: a = unsigned Int max; b = 0;


2

You cannot make struct do the masking for you; you'll need to manually provide integers that fit. If masking numbers with 0xff works for your application, then that is what you'll have to do. Python will not guess for you here, Python integers are unbounded and providing integers outside of the range of the struct slots is not a job left to guessing. After ...


0

There are a couple of things you can do. I put them both in in one example: const unsigned long LAST = 0xFFFFFFFFu ; It is bad form to use #define for constants.


2

ulong is not supposed to store signed integral values. Because it does not use the last bit for storing sign value of your integer. You have to use unchecked keyword to use something like this which will get you a wrap around behavior for the value string a = aaa.ToString(); ulong b = ulong.MaxValue; //18446744073709551615 ...


1

You expect this: printf("result is %u\n",c); to print -9. That's impossible. c is of type unsigned int, and %u prints a value of type unsigned int (so good work using the right format string for the argument). An unsigned int object cannot store a negative value. Going back a few line in your program: unsigned int a=-4; 4 is of type (signed) int, and ...


2

if this is an exercise in c and signed vs unsigned you should start by thinking - what does this mean? unsigned int a=-4; should it even compile? It seems like a contradiction. Use a debugger to inspect the memory stored at he location of a. Do you think it will be the same in this case? int a=-4; Does the compiler do different things when its asked ...


0

Using google, one finds the answer in two seconds.. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signedness For example, 0xFFFFFFFF gives −1, but 0xFFFFFFFFU gives 4,294,967,295 for 32-bit code Therefore, your 4294967287 is expected in this case. However, what exactly do you mean by "cast from unsigned to signed does not work?"


0

That answer is precisely correct for 32-bit ints. unsigned int a = -4; sets a to the bit pattern 0xFFFFFFFC, which, interpreted as unsigned, is 4294967292 (232 - 4). Likewise, b is set to 232 - 5. When you add the two, you get 0x1FFFFFFF7 (8589934583), which is wider than 32 bits, so the extra bits are dropped, leaving 4294967287, which, as it happens, is ...


3

N1570 6.5.3.3 Unary arithmetic operators p4: The result of the ~ operator is the bitwise complement of its (promoted) operand (that is, each bit in the result is set if and only if the corresponding bit in the converted operand is not set). The integer promotions are performed on the operand, and the result has the promoted type. ... Integer type ...


2

It's because the arguments to printf() are put into the stack in words, as there is no way inside printf to know that the argument is short. Also by using %u format you are merely stating that you are passing an unsigned number.


4

%u expects an unsigned int; if you want to print an unsigned short int, use %hu. EDIT Lundin is correct that ~i will be converted to type int before being passed to printf. i is also converted to int by virtue of being passed to a variadic function. However, printf will convert the argument back to unsigned short before printing if the %hu conversion ...


3

When you pass an argument to printf and that argument is of integer type shorter than int, it is implicitly promoted to int as per K&R argument promotion rules. Thus your printf-call actually behaves like: printf("%u\n", (int)~i); Notice that this is undefined behavior since you told printf that the argument has an unsigned type whereas int is ...


2

size_t is usually 32 bits when compiling for 32 bits targets. If you want to get a 64 bits size_t, simply set your compiler to target 64 bits platforms. If you're using the Visual Studio build chain, here is the documentation on the topic. If you're using the Qt build chain, I don't know how it's done, but it's certainly feasible somehow. You say in the ...


0

The size of a variable (or type) can be obtained with: sizeof(variableNameOrTypeName) If you're after the address of a given array element such as variableName[42], it's simply: &(variableName[42]) with no explicit mucking about with pointers. If you want to manipulate the actual double value when you only have a pointer to it, you need to ...


1

Just a bit of background to @UniCell's excellent answer. The hardware stores an int and an unsigned int in exactly the same way. No difference. If you start adding to or subtracting from them, they will overflow and underflow in exactly the same way. 0xFFFFFFFF + 1 = 0 0 - 1 = 0xFFFFFFFF If we consider the result as unsigned, 0xFFFFFFFF means ...


8

Because printf("%d\n", number); will print a signed value, even if the parameter is unsigned. Use printf("%u\n", number); for an unsigned value to be correctly printed.



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