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239

Undefined behavior is one of those aspects of the C and C++ language that can be surprising to programmers coming from other languages (other languages try to hide it better). Basically, it is possible to write C++ programs that do not behave in a predictable way, even though many C++ compilers will not report any errors in the program! Let's look at a ...


87

The code exhibits unspecified behavior due to unspecified order of evaluation of sub-expressions although it does not invoke undefined behavior since all side effects are done within functions which introduces a sequencing relationship between the side effects in this case. This example is mentioned in the proposal N4228: Refining Expression Evaluation ...


66

Well, this is basically a straight copy-paste from the standard 3.4.1 1 implementation-defined behavior unspecified behavior where each implementation documents how the choice is made 2 EXAMPLE An example of implementation-defined behavior is the propagation of the high-order bit when a signed integer is shifted right. 3.4.3 1 ...


41

Use list initialization to construct B. The elements are then guaranteed to be evaluated from left to right. C(std::unique_ptr<A> a) : B{a->x, std::move(a)} {} // ^ ^ - braces From ยง8.5.4/4 [dcl.init.list] Within the initializer-list of a braced-init-list, the initializer-clauses, including any that ...


40

Maybe easy wording could be easier for understanding than the rigorous definition of the standards. implementation-defined behavior The language says that we have data-types. The compiler vendors specify what sizes shall they use, and provide a documentation of what they did. undefined behavior You are doing something wrong. For example, you have a very ...


34

No. It is not. Undefined behavior is out of question here (assuming the int arithmetic does not overflow): all modifications of i are isolated by sequence points (using C++03 terminology). There's a sequence point at the entrance to each function and there's a sequence point at the exit. The behavior is unspecified here. Your code actually follows the same ...


27

As alternative to Praetorian's answer, you can use constructor delegate: class C : public B { public: C(std::unique_ptr<A> a) : C(a->x, std::move(a)) // this move doesn't nullify a. {} private: C(int x, std::unique_ptr<A>&& a) : B(x, std::move(a)) // this one does, but we already have copied x {} };


23

The expression f() + g() contains a minimum of 4 sequence points; one before the call to f() (after all zero of its arguments are evaluated); one before the call to g() (after all zero of its arguments are evaluated); one as the call to f() returns; and one as the call to g() returns. Further, the two sequence points associated with f() occur either both ...


18

As swegi says, it's undefined behavior. As Steve Jessop et al say, it's unspecified behavior before C99, and specified in C99 (the observed behavior is non-conformant to C99) What actually happens in most environments is that the return value from the last printf is left in the register used for return values. So it'll be 11 for n == 0, 12 if n is one ...


18

This is unspecified behavior, len_ = len is indeterminately sequenced with respect to the execution of the body of buffer(), which means that one will be executed before the other but it is not specified which order but there is an ordering so evaluations can not overlap therefore no undefined behavior. This means gcc, clang and Visual Studio are all correct....


17

From the official C Rationale Document The terms unspecified behavior, undefined behavior, and implementation-defined behavior are used to categorize the result of writing programs whose properties the Standard does not, or cannot, completely describe. The goal of adopting this categorization is to allow a certain variety among implementations which ...


17

I think you're right, it's not possible to implement memmove efficiently in standard C. The only truly portable way to test whether the regions overlap, I think, is something like this: [Edit: looking at this much later, I think it should be dst+len-1 at the end of the second line. But I can't be bothered to test it so I'll leave as it is for now, it's ...


16

It looks like you are subject to unspecified behavior here, since the order of evaluation of the initialization list expressions is unspecified, from the draft C99 standard section 6.7.8: The order in which any side effects occur among the initialization list expressions is unspecified.133) and note 133 says: In particular, the evaluation order ...


15

Answering because all the existing answers say that it's undefined behaviour, which is not true, so I have nothing I can upvote. In C89 (thanks to pmg for the reference to a draft standard), 5.1.2.2.3: A return from the initial call to the main function is equivalent to calling the exit function with the value returned by the main function ...


14

The order of evaluation of the following three subexpressions is unspecified: f(10) f(f(10)) f(f(f(10))) The compiler may evaluate those subexpressions in any order. You should not rely on a particular order of evaluation in your program, especially if you intend to compile using multiple compilers. This is because there is no sequence point anywhere in ...


14

return f(x,c) * x; The result of this operation depends on the order in which the two things are evaluated. Since you cannot predict the order they'll be evaluated, you cannot predict the result of this operation.


13

The semantics for op== and op!= explicitly say that the mapping is except for their truth-value result. So you need to look what is defined for their truth value result. If they say that the result is unspecified, then it is unspecified. If they define specific rules, then it is not. It says in particular Two pointers of the same type compare equal if ...


13

See Annex C for a list of sequence points. Function calls (the point between all arguments being evaluated and execution passing to the function) are sequence points. As you've said, it's unspecified which function gets called first, but each of the two functions will either see all the side effects of the other, or none at all.


12

The behavior of the expression func(0) + func(1) is defined in that the result will be the sum of the results obtained by calling func with a parameter of 0 and funcwith a parameter of 1. However, the order in which the functions are called is probably implementation dependent, although it might be unspecified. That is, the compiler could generate code ...


12

You are correct, and the interviewer shows a frighteningly common lack of understanding about the language and its rules. Those two lines are strictly equivalent, iff every operator<< called for the first line is always a free function (The standard says they are). As you rightly thought, the ordering between the function-calls, except where ones ...


12

No its not undefined behavior. But it does invoke unspecified behavior. This is because the order that sub-expressions are evaluated is unspecified. int j = ( b( i ) + c( i ) ) * e( i ) / a( i ) * d( i ); In the above expression the sub expressions: b(i) c(i) e(i) a(i) d(i) Can be evaluated in any order. Because they all have side-effects the results ...


11

Incorrect. Sequence points specify a partial order on the allowed ordering of operations. In case (2), there are sequence points: At the semicolon at the end of the line (1) After the evaluation of the arguments of g (i.e. the ++i) but before the call to g After the evaluation of the arguments of h (i.e. the ++i) but before the call to h After the ...


11

Well, no, it's not a case of undefined behaviour. It is a case of unspecified behaviour. It is unspecified whether the expression len_ = len will be evaluated before or after buffer(len+1). From the output you have described, g++ evaluates buffer(len+1) first, and clang evaluates len_ = len first. Both possibilities are correct, since the order of ...


9

C standards define UsB, UB and IDB in a way that can be summarized as follows: Unspecified Behavior (UsB) This is a behavior for which the standard gives some alternatives among which the implementation must choose, but it doesn't mandate how and when the choice is to be made. In other words, the implementation must accept user code triggering that ...


9

I think the whole premise of the question is wrong: How not specify an exact order of evaluation of function argument helps C & C++ compiler to generate optimized code? It is not about optimizing code (though it does allow that). It is about not penalizing compilers because the underlying hardware has certain ABI constraints. Some systems depend ...


9

The simple answer is that the result from equality operators (== and !=) are defined [Edit: i.e., specified], but from the ordering operators (<, <=, >, >=) are not [edit: i.e., they are unspecified]. Despite that, however, the comparison templates in the standard library (std::less, std::greater, std::less_equal and std::greater_equal) do all ...


9

C++03 chapter 5: Except where noted, the order of evaluation of operands of individual operators and subexpressions of individual expressions, and the order in which side effects take place, is unspecified. So in the case of f(x,c) * x, the order of evaluation of the operands is unspecified, meaning that you can't know if the left or right operand ...


8

C++ 2003 5.2.2 p8 The order of evaluation of arguments is unspecified. All side effects of argument expression evaluations take effect before the function is entered. The order of evaluation of the postfix expression and the argument expression list is unspecified. This means there is not a sequence point between evaluating f(x) and args. In C++ 2011 ...


8

3.6.2/1 says that "Objects with static storage duration (3.7.1) shall be zero-initialized (8.5) before any other initialization takes place". So you're right, they aren't default-initialized. But they are zero-initialized, which in fact for int is the same thing. For a class type it's not necessarily the same thing. That said, I'm not promising the ...


8

It isn't undefined behavior but it has unspecified results: The only modified object is i through the references passed to the functions. However, the call to the functions introduce sequence points (I don't have the C++ 2011 with me: they are called something different there), i.e. there is no problem of multiple changes within an expression causing ...



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