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467

Assuming 3 columns in the table.. ID, NAME, ROLE BAD: This will insert or replace all columns with new values for ID=1: INSERT OR REPLACE INTO Employee (id, name, role) VALUES (1, 'John Foo', 'CEO'); BAD: This will insert or replace 2 of the columns... the NAME column will be set to NULL or the default value: INSERT OR REPLACE INTO Employee (id, ...


320

Warning: this is not safe if executed from multiple sessions at the same time (see caveats below). Another clever way to do an "UPSERT" in postgresql is to do two sequential UPDATE/INSERT statements that are each designed to succeed or have no effect. UPDATE table SET field='C', field2='Z' WHERE id=3; INSERT INTO table (id, field, field2) SELECT ...


280

See my detailed answer to a very similar previous question @Beau Crawford's is a good way in SQL 2005 and below, though if you're granting rep it should go to the first guy to SO it. The only problem is that for inserts it's still two IO operations. MS Sql2008 introduces merge from the SQL:2003 standard: merge tablename as target using (values ('new ...


176

don't forget about transactions. Performance is good, but simple (IF EXISTS..) approach is very dangerous. When multiple threads will try to perform Insert-or-update you can easily get primary key violation. Solutions provided by @Beau Crawford & @Esteban show general idea but error-prone. To avoid deadlocks and PK violations you can use something ...


160

Yes, INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE. For example: INSERT INTO `usage` (`thing_id`, `times_used`, `first_time_used`) VALUES (4815162342, 1, NOW()) ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE `times_used` = `times_used` + 1


158

With PostgreSQL 9.1 this can be achieved using a writeable CTE (common table expression): WITH new_values (id, field1, field2) as ( values (1, 'A', 'X'), (2, 'B', 'Y'), (3, 'C', 'Z') ), upsert as ( update mytable m set field1 = nv.field1, field2 = nv.field2 FROM new_values nv WHERE m.id = nv.id ...


143

Searching postgresql's email group archives for "upsert" leads to finding an example of doing what you possibly want to do, in the manual: Example 38-2. Exceptions with UPDATE/INSERT This example uses exception handling to perform either UPDATE or INSERT, as appropriate: CREATE TABLE db (a INT PRIMARY KEY, b TEXT); CREATE FUNCTION merge_db(key ...


113

The MERGE statement merges data between two tables. Using DUAL allows us to use this command. create or replace procedure ups(xa number) as begin merge into mergetest m using dual on (a = xa) when not matched then insert (a,b) values (xa,1) when matched then update set b = b+1; end ups; / drop table mergetest; create table ...


106

9.5 and newer: PostgreSQL 9.5 and newer support INSERT ... ON CONFLICT UPDATE (and ON CONFLICT DO NOTHING), i.e. upsert. Comparison with ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE. For usage see the manual - specifically the conflict_action clause in the syntax diagram, and the explanatory text. (Note: links are to /devel/ manual until 9.5 is released). Unlike the ...


83

Do an UPSERT: UPDATE MyTable SET FieldA=@FieldA WHERE Key=@Key IF @@ROWCOUNT = 0 INSERT INTO MyTable (FieldA) VALUES (@FieldA) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upsert


81

MySQL (and subsequently SQLite) also support the REPLACE INTO syntax: REPLACE INTO my_table (pk_id, col1) VALUES (5, '123'); This automatically identifies the primary key and finds a matching row to update, inserting a new one if none is found.


81

INSERT OR REPLACE is NOT equivalent to "UPSERT". Say I have the table Employee with the fields id, name, and role: INSERT OR REPLACE INTO Employee ("id", "name", "role") VALUES (1, "John Foo", "CEO") INSERT OR REPLACE INTO Employee ("id", "role") VALUES (1, "code monkey") Boom, you've lost the name of the employee number 1. SQLite has replaced it with a ...


68

INSERT OR IGNORE INTO visits VALUES ($ip, 0); UPDATE visits SET hits = hits + 1 WHERE ip LIKE $ip; This requires the "ip" column to have a UNIQUE (or PRIMARY KEY) constraint. EDIT: Another great solution: http://stackoverflow.com/a/4330694/89771.


62

Eric B’s answer is OK if you want to preserve just one or maybe two columns from the existing row. If you want to preserve a lot of rows, it gets too cumbersome fast. Here’s an approach that will scale well to any amount of columns on either side. To illustrate it I will assume the following schema: CREATE TABLE page ( id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, ...


58

The dual example above which is in PL/SQL was great becuase I wanted to do something similar, but I wanted it client side...so here is the SQL I used to send a similar statement direct from some C# MERGE INTO Employee USING dual ON ( "id"=2097153 ) WHEN MATCHED THEN UPDATE SET "last"="smith" , "name"="john" WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN INSERT ("id","last","name") ...


54

As mentioned in my comment, you don't have to do the subselect to reference to the row that's causing ON DUPLICATE KEY to fire. So, in your example you can use the following: INSERT INTO `item` (`item_name`, items_in_stock) VALUES( 'A', 27) ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE `new_items_count` = `new_items_count` + 27 Remember that most things are really simple, if ...


50

If you are generally doing updates I would .. Begin a transaction Do the update Check the rowcount If it is 0 do the insert Commit If you are generally doing inserts I would Begin a transaction Try an insert Check for primary key violation error if we got an error do the update Commit This way you avoid the select and you are ...


46

Q&A Style Well, after researching and fighting with the problem for hours, I found out that there are two ways to accomplish this, depending on the structure of your table and if you have foreign keys restrictions activated to maintain integrity. I'd like to share this in a clean format to save some time to the people that may be in my situation. ...


41

Please read the post on my blog for a good, safe pattern you can use. There are a lot of considerations, and the accepted answer on this question is far from safe. For a quick answer try the following pattern. It will work fine on SQL 2000 and above. SQL 2005 gives you error handling which opens up other options and SQL 2008 gives you a MERGE command. ...


40

Upsert needs to be a boolean, you set it to a dictionary. Change the third argument to just True: self.word_counts[source].update({'date':posttime},{"$inc" : words},True) You should find the error resolves.


38

Your assumption is right, this is the optimal way to do it and it's called upsert/merge. Importance of UPSERT - from sqlservercentral.com: For every update in the case mentioned above we are removing one additional read from the table if we use the UPSERT instead of EXISTS. Unfortunately for an Insert, both the UPSERT and IF EXISTS methods use ...


36

I realize this is an old thread but I've been working in sqlite3 as of late and came up with this method which better suited my needs of dynamically generating parameterized queries: insert or ignore into <table>(<primaryKey>, <column1>, <column2>, ...) values(<primaryKeyValue>, <value1>, <value2>, ...); update ...


36

i finally got the Upsert syntax using MERGE in SQL Server 2008. Using what Jacob wanted to do (an Upsert): IF EXISTS(SELECT * FROM member_topic WHERE mt_member = 0 AND mt_topic = 110) BEGIN --update existing row UPDATE member_topic SET mt_notes = 'test' END ELSE BEGIN --insert new row INSERT INTO member_topic (mt_member, mt_topic, mt_notes) ...


32

Yes, DB2 has the MERGE statement, which will do an UPSERT (update or insert). MERGE INTO target_table USING source_table ON match-condition {WHEN [NOT] MATCHED THEN [UPDATE SET ...|DELETE|INSERT VALUES ....|SIGNAL ...]} [ELSE IGNORE] See: ...


30

If you want to UPSERT more than one record at a time you can use the ANSI SQL:2003 DML statement MERGE. MERGE INTO table_name WITH (HOLDLOCK) USING table_name ON (condition) WHEN MATCHED THEN UPDATE SET column1 = value1 [, column2 = value2 ...] WHEN NOT MATCHED THEN INSERT (column1 [, column2 ...]) VALUES (value1 [, value2 ...]) Check out Mimicking MERGE ...


29

Many people will suggest you use MERGE, but I caution you against it. By default, it doesn't protect you from concurrency and race conditions any more than multiple statements, but it does introduce other dangers: http://www.mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/3074/use-caution-with-sql-servers-merge-statement/ Even with this "simpler" syntax available, I still ...


28

Another alternative without the exception check: UPDATE tablename SET val1 = in_val1, val2 = in_val2 WHERE val3 = in_val3; IF ( sql%rowcount = 0 ) THEN INSERT INTO tablename VALUES (in_val1, in_val2, in_val3); END IF;


27

INSERT INTO <table> SELECT <natural keys>, <other stuff...> FROM <table> WHERE NOT EXISTS -- race condition risk here? ( SELECT 1 FROM <table> WHERE <natural keys> ) UPDATE ... WHERE <natural keys> there is a race condition in the first INSERT. The key may not exists during the inner query SELECT, but does ...


24

An alternative to MERGE (the "old fashioned way"): begin insert into t (mykey, mystuff) values ('X', 123); exception when dup_val_on_index then update t set mystuff = 123 where mykey = 'X'; end;


21

IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM [Table] WHERE ID = rowID) UPDATE [Table] SET propertyOne = propOne, property2 . . . ELSE INSERT INTO [Table] (propOne, propTwo . . .) Edit: Alas, even to my own detriment, I must admit the solutions that do this w/o a select seem to be better since they accomplish the task with one less step.



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