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9

This is a close to complete list. I'm not sure about the android/WP development support for reading those ascii charachters though.


5

Your device will not be able to draw power while connected as the Host. You should look into the Android Open Accessory(AOA) Protocol, though you need the proper hardware to connect to. AOA allows the tablet to be connected as a USB accessory which will allow it to draw power and charge, but it also lets the Android device behave as if it were a host ...


4

You should use adb over TCP, the Android developer site has a short article here under Debugging considerations (bottom of the page).


4

You can create an application based on FileManager open source project on Github. You can specify there to identify your device. You can change these code according to your need. Here is the link Adroid-File-Manager


3

Samsung Galaxy S II supports it. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrKkklO_Fok


3

Right, what you need to do is this: Unzip the tarball source Go into the respective directory of the source - cd peak-linux-driver-7.7/ as quoted by the above PDF cd peak-linux-driver-x.y make clean make su -c “make install” When the build completes, issue this command /sbin/modprobe pcan However, having stated this, I do not see ...


3

The hardware on the Nexus 1 (like many other phones) supports USB host mode even though the vanilla drivers that comes with it do not. However, there's a driver available on the net that allows you to turn the support on.See here: http://sven.killig.de/android/N1/2.2/usb_host/ and since it's a Google dev phone "rooting" is a supported feature, not a hack.


3

The official way to determine if the device has USB host capability is to use the associated system feature. Ideally, add a <uses-feature> element to your manifest, indicating that you are interested in the android.hardware.usb.host feature. If you do not absolutely need that feature, add android:required="false" as an attribute. If you went with ...


3

Are you running any apps on the android side when messing with the FTDI device? Or just some Arduino code? If you are running an Android app, do you have this line in your manifest? <uses-feature android:name="android.hardware.usb.host" android:required="true"></uses-feature> And still in the manifest, but in between the ...


2

I decided to re-check everything. The android.hardware.usb.host.xml file definitely was in the /system/etc/permissions directory, and it had appropriate file permissions, but when I came to look at the contents I found that it contained the HTML description for the page at ...


2

There is no "default" mode in USB OTG. OTG controller detects the state the USB's fifth pin(ID pin). If the ID-pin is grounded or floating, the connected device is a Host or device. USB 2.0 spec introduced 3 new protocols, ADP, SRP, HNP. Pls reference HNP for "a way to programmatically switch from host to slave mode and vice versa". As your second ...


2

It is not possible to send data that way. Android devices running the USB-OTG will act as a USB host. A PC only has USB host capabilities. So by connecting a USB cable directly from a PC's USB port to an Android device running USB OTG, you are attempting to connect two USB hosts together - which doesn't work! That also means you won't be able to send data ...


2

I found one path to go in this direction is: i found a project here : github.com/danny-source/List-USB-OTG I have also asked the same question here: Play Video using connected USB via OTG cable in Andoid?


2

String file = Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory() + "mnt/usb_storage/Garmin/system.xml"; You mean: String fileName = "/mnt/usb_storage/Garmin/system.xml"; That's all. Note tne /mnt/... so NOT mnt/...


2

There is a project dedicated to serial communication on Android. android-serialport-api. I think, it is a good resource to start with. FTDI also provides Android related resources.


2

Edit /usr/share/arduino/hardware/arduino/cores/arduino/USBDesc.h, and comment out the line #define HID_ENABLED so that it reads instead: /* #define HID_ENABLED */ This is part of the code that gets compiled into each sketch to enable USB support, and this change will prevent HID support from being compiled into future sketches. You will need to be root ...


2

Nokia's Symbian^3 phones support USB OTG 1.3.


2

The litekit is supported by the vanilla Linux kernel. It's pretty easy to declare the OTG for device mode. You just need to declare it as device when you register your device: static struct fsl_usb2_platform_data usb_pdata = { .operating_mode = FSL_USB2_DR_DEVICE, .phy_mode = FSL_USB2_PHY_ULPI, }; Register code: ...


2

You may have to take help of linux kernel so I think just execute one simple command that can give you list of devices connected to your device Here it is Process process = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("cat /proc/devices"); BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(process.getInputStream())); or you can use udevinfo I dont ...


2

If you have honeycomb or above use the USB Manager Service UsbManager manager = (UsbManager) getSystemService(Context.USB_SERVICE); HashMap<String, UsbDevice> devices = manager.getDeviceList();


2

If you just want to be able to access USB storage (like a flash drive) you can open the files the normal Java way (java.io.File, etc). Android ICS automatically mounts flash drives under /sdcard/usbStorage/, but I'm not sure about previous versions or other types of hardware. It might still work, though, so I'd suggest that you test it and see what happens.


2

From the app description, Android 2.x devices need to be rooted. This suggests that they have some native implementation of the USB host code (possibly a pre-compiled kernel module they load). Therefore, the solution for this varies based on the specific hardware and software (kernel, vendor modifications, skin) it is running.


2

The only sure way of getting this done is to use API level above 12, otherwise a few phones may have support for usb host but most of them wont support it. The reason being first of all you need hardware support for usb host, even if that is present the drivers needed might not be compiled into the kernel, i did some work while trying to implement usb host ...


1

It doesn't look like you're actually reading any data. If you've got an EndPoint going from the device to the host you should be able to read data from it with the bulkTransfer method. I'm not all that familiar with low-level USB communication, but I'd assume that you need to handle file system parsing yourself. If you read the first sector (512 bytes) on ...


1

To the best of my knowledge none of the current WP7 devices provide USB host support (more than happy to be corrected, though :)).


1

My memory is too fuzzy to answer this so I can only say that I think I worked on a project that did just this. If I recollect properly, it was a proprietary OTG controller that implemented the full set of EHCI registers with a very minor tweak of an additional register or bit to determine whether the controller was attached as a host or a device. Although ...


1

Isochronous transfers does not guarantee packet delivery. So if host controller has other active transfers, it will silently drop isochronous packets. If you need guaranteed packed delivery, you should use bulk transfers (but then it will not guarantee delivery time). Isochronous is ideal for applications, like sound or video streaming, where you need ...


1

The exact behavior of USB OTG devices is described in the specification you can find at usb.org. There is a PDF inside the zip called USB_OTG. The Host Negotiation Protocol in section 6 covers how two OTG devices decide which one is getting the embedded host. Basically this is archived by driving pull-up and pull-down resistors on the D+ line. Note: When ...


1

Thanks to the comment from Chris Stratton, I was able to find the problem in my code. I was sending 0x04 (Ctrl-D) instead of 0x34 (4) The controlTransfer seems to be unnecessary, I'm using PIC16F1454 with built in USB functionality The receiving buffer was smaller than the reply of the PIC which also caused problems The modified code is below: package ...


1

The Problem is at your usb device. Unfortunately no one could help you out with this. Try changing the usb on the go it works fine sometimes sometime



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