Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

You should try www.mockflow.com


0

This was also driving me nuts when using AWT Button class... Here's the answer: There is no .getText() method for a Button... you need to use .getLabel() Now, the story for JButtons: Depending on your version of java, getLabel() was deprecated, and finally replaced by getText... Aren't namespaces wonderful?


0

Try this code (Expert Advisor). Ok, it is not efficient (it recalculate every tick), but I believe it demonstrate the concept pretty well. and here's the code for it: //+------------------------------------------------------------------+ //| GeraldHighLowV0R1.mq4 | //| Copyright 2015, ...


2

When the docs say that -width for labels is interpreted as a number of characters it's probably using the average width of a character rather than the maximum width. As you discovered, when using fixed-width fonts you can work in characters and everything will come out nicely. When using variable-width fonts things get difficult quickly because there's no ...


0

For me, it depends how much logic is encapsulated in the widget/GUI. If it's just about simple forms, I prefer to use QtDesigner. If it contains complex checks or interaction, I tend to program it.


0

Adapting from this answer (you need ImageOps and ImageDraw imported from PIL), you can create a circular mask for your zoomed image using: def create_mask(self): self.mask = Image.new('L', (200,200), 0) draw = ImageDraw.Draw(self.mask) draw.ellipse((0, 0) + self.mask.size, fill=255) Then, you have to apply the mask in your crop function: ...


0

This type of the component is called carousel. There are number of choices: http://kenwheeler.github.io/slick/ http://sorgalla.com/jcarousel/ http://owlgraphic.com/owlcarousel/ http://getbootstrap.com/javascript/#carousel


0

The JOptionPane has the functionality to have a combobox built in. This is from here: import java.awt.BorderLayout; import java.awt.Component; import java.awt.event.ActionEvent; import java.awt.event.ActionListener; import javax.swing.JButton; import javax.swing.JFrame; import javax.swing.JOptionPane; public class MainClass { public static void ...


3

Use the get function if(strcmp(get(obj, 'String'), 'Text') If you don't know you object, you can use findall(0, 'Tag', 'yourtag')


0

(Sorry if I am misunderstanding this question.) In landscape mode all current iPhones except 6+ are compact - compact. In portrait mode they are width compact, height regular. iOS Human Interface Guidelines - Adaptivity and Layout You can also choose to restrict an app to being portrait mode only in the general settings.


1

Here's a small example: h = uicontrol('style', 'edit', 'string', 'initial string'); %// create object set(h, 'string', 'changed string'); %// change object property (The second line could be part of the another object's callback function, which causes the first object's string to change.) As an alternative, if you don't have a handle to the object, you ...


1

Although the answer by @AleksanderMonk works fine, I think binding to the tag "one" would be easier in this case, especially when you're planning on making more lines. You can use the tag instead of the id in both the tag_bind and the itemconfigure function: from tkinter import * def change_color(event): if event.type == "7": # Enter ...


0

Every time you open your app the buttons are enabled by default(excepting those which are disabled from the start). So you need to saved this state to retain it's state. Here is how to retain and restore the state.


0

You could use SharedPreferences to store your wanted activity. Then check it right after MainActivity start, to decide change to new activity or not //check when start app public class MainActivity extends Activity{ public static SharedPreferences sharedPreferences; @Override protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) { ... ...


0

You have to take a look at Android application lifecycles, when your app goes to the background it will get to the state onPause() and later to onStop(), what you want is saving your application state for later use, take a look at this thread: Saving Activity state in Android I think the top answer is what you want to do. You have to save the status of your ...


0

So I've tried another thing (unsuccessfully..) When I click on a button, it executes startThrobber() and sends a signal to the following function : def go(self): self.startThrobber() script = subprocess.Popen(r'"C:\Program Files\FME\fme.exe" ', shell=False) while script.poll() == None: time.sleep(1) else: p.stopThrobber() ...


0

An app can have 1 glance associated with it. However it can be modified from time to time as per your requirement. awakeWithContext() is called once for the controller. You can do general init work there. willActivate() will be called everytime the glance controller is about to be initialised and you can request new data, change view there, do other ...


0

I created a drop-in UIRefreshControl+beginRefreshing category that fixes this issue. In brief, it fixes tintColor issue and manually tableView adjust contentOffset to make sure the refresh control is visible. Please try :)


0

The answer is as simple as: No. I'm not sure about changing it programmatically (haven't tried) I don't think that you can load different glances. The point of glances is to allow users to find one piece of info ultra quickly. For that, they need to know what they will be looking at. That's why there is only one glance per app.


0

From what I understand I cant change the UI from other class other then the controller Actually the correct statement is: "You cannot change the UI from any thread other than the JavaFX UI thread". So, the solution is to use Platform.runLater() from the Splitter as: // Java 8 Platform.runLater(() -> { c.updateHebFlow("Script by TulTul", ...


0

I think that all you need to do is make a list of all line ids (line1, line2,..) and on hover just change color for all items in the list. from tkinter import * def set_color(event): for x in all_ids: c.itemconfig(x, fill="blue") return def return_color(event): for x in all_ids: c.itemconfig(x, fill="white") return ...


0

Use Services to do the work in background. And to remove the UI and not actually close the app (kill the process) you need the following code to execute on the button.This code will bring up the Home screen and will let android decide that if app has spent to much time in background and finally android may close it but the work you already defined in ...


1

The best approach to do so on android is to create a service. Services are intended to work on the background without having a gui shown. You can easily communicate with the service and share data between your application and service at anytime. Even if you reloaded your app


0

No matter how i've moved stuff around in my code, upon launch EVERY time the GUI is unresponsive, but sound plays. I've managed to reproduce this. One important thing missing in your description is the exact way you create and show the window in your main() method. For example, the following freezes the video leaving the sound playing: [STAThread] ...


0

OK, the whole hybrid console/GUI thing is a new one on me but I'm just going to assume there's a real need to do things that way. The Application.Run method doesn't return until the application closes. That's why your console is locked up. Don't create the Application object inside the window. Do it externally. Also, spawn another thread to kick off ...


0

Try ungit: http://root-project.org/2014/07/09/work/ungit-on-cloud9/ Note that you can only run on port 8080.


0

You can get the tty of a window, and then use that to send a command. I've heard of a tool called "ttyecho" though I've never used it, but supposedly it can be used to send a command to a different pty (another window).


0

Try this <RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools" android:layout_width="match_parent" android:layout_height="match_parent"> <Button android:id="@+id/bSignIn" android:text="SignIn" android:layout_centerInParent="true" ...


0

Simply add: android:layout_below="@id/bSignIn" And change centerHorizontal to centerInParent in the bCreateAccount button XML to place it below the prior.


3

In your bracketEntry class, in the addBrackets method, you call user_entry = StartPage(). However, you declare StartPage's __init__ method as def __init__(self, parent, controller):, which means you have to provide parent and controller arguments. Edit: To fix the method, you are going to have to pass the parent and controller objects all the way down the ...


1

You've defined the __init__ method of StartPage to take two required arguments, parent and controller. But in the line that's causing the error, you are just calling StartPage() without passing those arguments. As the error says, you need to pass them.


0

Try this code: <RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" android:orientation="vertical" android:layout_width="match_parent" android:padding="25dp" android:layout_height="match_parent"> <LinearLayout android:layout_width="wrap_content" android:layout_height="wrap_content" ...


0

set android:gravity="center_vertical" to RelativeLayout and android:layout_below="@+id/bSignIn" to your bCreateAccount. here is the the code. <RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools" android:orientation="vertical" android:layout_width="match_parent" ...


0

You should be adding a wrapper which usesandroid:layout_centerInParent in accordance to the base layout. Inside this, you could 'android:layout_below' to achieve what you're looking for. <RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools" ...


0

Use this: <RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android" xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools" android:layout_width="match_parent" android:padding="25dp" android:layout_height="match_parent"> <RelativeLayout android:layout_width="wrap_content" android:layout_height="wrap_content" ...


0

The problem with your code is that you can't call functions when adding button commands. You can't write Button(command=function()), you have to write Button(command=function). If you want to pass an argument into a function, you'll have to do it like this: Instead of: mButton = Button(mGui, text = "CON", command = assign("CON")).pack() mButton = ...


1

First of all, you can make the problem slightly easier by thinking of GUI as something that does nothing constantly while updating the screen, as opposed to command line not doing anything while waiting for input. Since it's a turn based game, there must be requirements to when the turn is considered ready for computation. Typically this happens when the ...


0

I've actually found a pretty simple solution. After setting the UI Element transform to: transform.SetParent(transform.root); The UI Element is placed as the first child of the Canvas, thus effectivly placing itself to the foreground.


1

Your code looks fine to me. You seem to be missing a guidata(hObject,handles)at the end to update the guidata so this could be the problem (unless it's there but you did not include it in your above snippet). In any case here is a bit of code that looks very much like yours and works fine. Try it out so you might see what is wrong with yours... function ...


1

The thing about widgets is that when you coerce them to a string, they return their tkinter id. What you need to do is create a control variable (http://infohost.nmt.edu/tcc/help/pubs/tkinter/web/control-variables.html) and associate it with your entry. self.entry_var = tk.StringVar() e1 = tk.Entry(self,textvariable=self.entry_var) Instead of retrieving ...


0

I was recently tackling the problem you described: display doesn't update until the process finishes Here is a complete example that I got working with the help of @andy_s in the #Kivy IRC channel: My main.py: from kivy.app import App from kivy.uix.popup import Popup from kivy.factory import Factory from kivy.properties import ObjectProperty from ...


1

using HtmlService with IFRAME mode... $("html, body").animate({ scrollTop: 0 }, "slow");


3

panelMain = new JPanel(new GridLayout(0, 3)); You set the layout for panelMain to be a GridLayout(); panelMain.add(panel1, BorderLayout.PAGE_END); panelMain.add(panel2, BorderLayout.LINE_START); panelMain.add(panel3, BorderLayout.LINE_END); panelMain.add(jtf, BorderLayout.CENTER); But then you treat panelMain like a BorderLayout. You can't just ...


0

Tcl/Tk Used to be the scripting language of choice if you wanted to provide a bunch of C/C++ methods with a (not too complicated) GUI. Python also provides GUI element via PyQT and PyKDE. I think it's much easier to use a scripting language like this to bind to C then trying to do Swing<=>C/C++ bridging.


2

Yes, its possible. You would have to use JNI. You should really consider the learning curve of doing JNI vs learning whatever GUI framework you want to use you C/C++. As someone who has done this on multiple professional projects though, I really would warn against it. It can produce very hard to find bugs.


0

In KDE 4.13.3 (mayby in some olders and newers you can do this (translation may be inacurrate - I use polish version): run the desired program right-click on its title bar choose "more actions"->"additional window settings..." (even more options are under "additional program settings...") go to tab "size&layout" Mark checkbox "Screen" and choose ...


1

Yes, if you're using unity GUI system, you could create some kind of layers with GUI.depth. GUI elements drawn with lower depth values will appear on top of elements with higher values (ie, you can think of the depth as "distance" from the camera). Here's an example : function OnGUI() { GUI.depth = 1; // You set to 1 by default ...


0

Try to use display: table; and table-cell for the div .wrap { width: 100%; display: table; } .wrap > div { display: table-cell; border: solid 1px red; min-height: 100px; height: 100px;/*remove after inner dom creating*/ } .wrap > div.fixed { width: 100px; } <div class="wrap"> <div ...


1

A solution that handles all horizontal alignments, with a Swift implementation example. Just translate to Objective-C if needed. class ButtonIconRight: UIButton { override func imageRectForContentRect(contentRect:CGRect) -> CGRect { var imageFrame = super.imageRectForContentRect(contentRect) imageFrame.origin.x = ...


0

An alternative to the static/edit uicontrol is to use a msgbox or an errordlg to display the result to the user depending on the result of your function. if myFunction msgbox ( 'All Ok' ); else errordlg ( 'Error in Function', 'Error' ) end



Top 50 recent answers are included