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25

AS A [person/role] I NEED TO [do something] SO THAT [provides business value]. For your example a user story might look like this: AS A user of the XYZ application I NEED TO get reports of ABC faster SO THAT we can increase our conversion rates. ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA - The database reliably completes transactions on average in 2 seconds. I've added an ...


21

You might want to think of your story as a vertical slice of the system. A story may (and often will) touch components in all of the architectural layers of the system. You might therefore want to think of your tasks as the work needed to be done on each of the components that your story touches. For example, Let's say you have a story like In order to ...


16

Trello is perfect for something like this. It's very simple, yet flexible. It's like a simpler version of PivotalTracker, mentioned above.


15

A "User Story" in extreme programming is supposed to be the smallest possible unit of business value. Some handy suggestions for rules: User stories should only ever be written directly by the business. We want them engaged and to feel a real sense of ownership. All stories are supposed to have some kind of business value attached - even technical stories ...


15

The classic template to write good stories is: "As a <role>, I want to <action> so that <business value>" (or variations around this) and a story should indeed provide business value. Why? Well, if a story does not communicate the business value it generates, how could a (very likely non technical) Product Owner evaluate its importance and ...


13

Here are a few resources that I've collected over time and that might help: Patterns for Splitting User Stories Story Weight Reduction Toolkit Twenty Ways to Split Stories Ways to split user stories Too big or too complicated, there is always a way to put a story on diet (maybe you won't obtain the final result in one iteration but this doesn't mean you ...


12

I personally refer to the way Mike Cohn defined CoS in Agile Estimating and Planning. Here is an excerpt from an online chapter (with an example): Conditions of Satisfaction Every project is initiated with a set of objectives. Your current project may be to create the world’s best word processor. Creating the world’s best word processor, ...


12

Scrum is not very prescriptive and there is nothing in Scrum that forces you to use User Stories for your Product Backlog Items (PBIs). You can definitely do Scrum without capturing requirements/features as user stories, user stories are just one way to do it. Actually, stories do work for many teams, especially web development teams, but this doesn't mean ...


12

Actually, the original use cases (see Jacobson's OOSE) were pretty lightweight, much as user stories are now. Over time, they evolved until a common format for "use cases" now is a complicated document with inputs, outputs, inheritance, uses relationships, pseudocode, etc. Programmers, in general, try to convert everything into programming. In any case, ...


12

Its been a while since this was asked, but the best option out there in my opinion is http://www.Sprint.ly Really powerful. Really beautiful. Really User Story focused!


12

I've used Eidos. I think it's the best if you want to use in Agile project (I've used it for real 3-4 projects for the real customer). Eidos team keep developing to serve human's need in Agile project. I think they invite beta users to test now. If you have problems about co-located team, this tool is quite useful (I prefer physical thing anyway if my team ...


11

Archive them for reference on future projects. They will be useful when you have to estimate story points. Often times, similar-sounding stories occur across projects.


11

We used to miss it out as well. And by leaving it out we missed a lot. To understand the feature properly and not just do the thing right but DO THE RIGHT THING it is key to know WHY the feature, and for that the next key is WHO (the role) In DDD terms, stakeholder. Stakeholders can be different, everyone who cares. From programmers and db admins to all the ...


10

You should not break down the stories into other technical stories any further. During the Sprint Planning Meeting, the team breaks down the stories into tasks. Those tasks are then estimated in numbers of hours. During the Sprint, you keep track of the number of remaining hours in the Sprint burndown charts. The stories are for the end-users. The tasks ...


10

Kent Beck coined the term User Story and he wasn't using the template you're mentioning but some kind of free form to capture requirements on a card: So I say, "Tell me the stories of what the system will do. Write down the name of the story and a paragraph or two." But it's Dan North that suggested the User Story Template on the eXtreme Programming ...


10

So basically, your question is "What can I do if people claim a task is too big for a user story, and can't be split up. In my experience, almost any problem can be split up. Ask them if they can implement a simplified version, leave out advanced features, maybe even use default values in some places; basically anything to produce something that gives ...


10

From User Stories Applied book (Mike Cohn), he talked about a "Good user story" which should have these characteristics: I.N.V.E.S.T (Independent, Negotiable, Valuable, Estimable, Small, Testable) Your question falls to "Independent" characteristic. The reason to combine OR separate is depending on how to make them "independent". The reason to ...


10

You can use any scale you like. What I tend to do is the Fibbonaci (1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, ...). To set the baseline of the scale we took a golden story which was average size and valued that with an 8 and one with a little less size and valued that 5. We now just value all the other stories to those two. And since you are working Agile you are just ...


9

IMO a backlog should not include developer stories. There is no way that any Product Owner can sensibly prioritise these alongside business functionality. And what happens if the Product Owner deems one of them unimportant and so pulls it out the backlog? If the team then insists on keeping the story, you are in a situation where ownership of the backlog ...


9

I'm at odds with what a couple of other people have said. First up the bit I agree with - stories are a great way of stating functional requirements. For my money they're one of the best ways of actually communicating requirements in a way end users will really take in. I've seen too many specs that get signed off without ever having been read. The one ...


9

I would counsel you to think carefully before adopting a tool, especially since it sounds like your process is likely to be fluid at first as you find your feet. My feeling is that a tool may be more likely to constrain you than enable you at this stage, and you will find it no substitute for a good card-wall in physical space. I would suggest you instead ...


8

Don't wait. Build a prototype based on whatever minimal requirements you do have and get feedback ASAP from the product owner. More often than not they don't know what they want anyway - if you can show them something tangible as a starting point you're more likely to get useful feedback. Also, once you have a better idea of the real requirements you will ...


8

When it comes down to it "agile" is just a label, and people disagree over exactly what it means. Similarly people call very different things "use cases." In my experience the primary difference between the two is that a user story is focused on the user, and is usually shorter and less formal - ideally, it should easily fit on a postcard. It probably ...


8

I personally like the BDD style user stories and tasks. Generally, under BDD/Agile you will create user stories in a planning meeting along the following lines: As a [role] I need [capability] so that [desired outcome]. A user story really shouldn't be more complex than that, as they are really just placeholders for future conversations (a key aspect of ...


7

We are using remainig time for sprint burndown - teams can see progress every day. If there are flat parts, than they really occured. In the release burndown we are using story points. Release planning is more about he feature completness, the time is tracked on the sprint level. Product owner is interested in completed stories. Number of tasks is useless. ...


7

Try, To Achieve [Business Value] As [User] I need [Feature]. The goal is to focus on the value the feature delivers. It helps you think in vertical slices, which reduces pure "technical tasks" that aren't visible. It's not an easy transition, but when you start thinking vertically you start really being able to reduce the waste in your process. Another way ...


7

Worry not about the implications at this stage. A user story should be: I Independent The user story should be self contained, in a way that there is no inherent dependency on another user story. N Negotiable: User stories, up until they are part of an iteration, can always be changed and rewritten. V Valuable: A user story must deliver value to the end ...


7

I don't see why an actor should have to be a human - your example is a perfectly good reason for it not to be. The thing with methodology like this is not to get hung up about sticking to the minutiae of the defined practice. Even if the people who originally came up with the concept of "user stories" thought that they should only apply to humans, there's ...



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