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40

There is a PHP bug that can cause this warning, even if you don't change the array. Short version, if any PHP debug functions examine the sort array, they will change the reference count and trick usort() into thinking you've changed the data. So you will get that warning by doing any of the following in your sort function (or any code called from it): ...


28

Finally, I discovered the source of this error. The problem was that this code was inside a class. If that's your case, then you should call usort this way: usort($items, array("MyClass", "compare_method")); Furthermore, if your Class is in a namespace, you should list the full namespace in usort. usort($items, array('Full\Namespace\WebPageInformation', ...


23

The exact definition of $a and $b will depend upon the algorithm used to sort the array. To sort anything you have to have a means to compare two elements, that's what the callback function is used for. Some sorting algorithms can start anywhere in the array, others can start only in a specific part of it so there's no fixed meaning in $a and $b other than ...


19

You can use usort as: function cmp($a, $b) { return $a['weight'] - $b['weight']; } usort($arr,"cmp");


14

In PHP, one option for a callback is to pass a two-element array containing an object handle and a method name to call on the object. For example, if $obj was an instance of class MyCallable, and you want to call the method1 method of MyCallable on $obj, then you can pass array($obj, "method1") as a callback. One solution using this supported callback type ...


13

Since you're using an anonymous function, you can use it as a closure like this: $filter = <whatever>; usort($this->data, function($arr1, $arr2) use ($filter) { return ($arr1[$filter] > $arr2[$filter]) ? 1 : -1; });


13

I think what you need is uasort — FROM PHP DOC Sort an array with a user-defined comparison function and maintain index association Example uasort($stats, 'compare');


11

Personally, I would use a custom (anonymous) function in conjunction with usort(). EDIT: Re - your comment. Hopefully this will put you on the right track. This function gives equal priority to elements which both have EN or neither have EN, or adjusted priority when just one has EN. usort($array,function ($a, $b) { $ac = ...


9

When defining closures, you can use the use keyword to let the function "see" a certain variable (or variables). See also the PHP documentation about Anonymous functions. Closures may also inherit variables from the parent scope. Any such variables must be declared in the function header. Inheriting variables from the parent scope is not the ...


9

The function cmp itself doesn't do the sorting. It just tells usort if a value is smaller, equal or greater than another value. E.g. if $a = 5 and $b = 9 it will return 1 to indicate that the value in $b is greater than the one in $a. Sorting is done by usort.


8

I think you want array_multisort: array_multisort($a[1], $a[0], $a[2]); gives Array ( [0] => Array ( [0] => 6 [1] => 5 [2] => 1 [3] => 4 ) [1] => Array ( [0] => 63.54 [1] => 190.62 [2] => 272.05 [3] ...


8

see http://docs.php.net/function.usort: bool usort ( array &$array , callback $cmp_function ) The sorted array is not the return value. usort() alters the array you're passing as the first argument.


7

Unfortunately, this won't work in php. There is no nested scope, each function has its own local scope. Besides that, all functions, no matter where they are declared, are global and can be declared only once, so you'll get an error message if sortObjectsByProperty will be called more than once. in php5.3 you can work around this by using lambdas, for ...


7

The property you assume is called stability: A stable sorting algorithm will not change the order of elements that are equal. php's sorting functions are not stable (because non-stable sorts may be slightly faster). From the documentation of usort: If two members compare as equal, their order in the sorted array is undefined. If you want a stable ...


7

From the documentation: If two members compare as equal, their relative order in the sorted array is undefined. You can use this function [source] that preserves order in the case of two elements being equal: function mergesort(&$array, $cmp_function = 'strcmp') { // Arrays of size < 2 require no action. if (count($array) < 2) ...


6

To sort anything you need a means to compare two items and figure out if one comes before the other. This is what you supply to usort. This function will be passed two items from your input array, and returns the order they should be in. Once you have a means to compare two elements, you can use sort-algorithm-of-your-choice. If you are unfamiliar, you ...


6

My first guess is that usort expects an integer response, and will round off your return values if they are not integers. In the case of 0.29, when it is compared to 0, the result is 0.29 (or -0.29), which rounds off to 0. For usort, 0 means the two values are equal. Try something like this instead: usort($myArray, function($a, $b) { ...


5

You're half way there (though you were sorting backwards for membkey based on your example): function order_by_member_key($a, $b) { if ($a['membkey'] == $b['membkey']) { // membkey is the same, sort by head if ($a['head'] == $b['head']) return 0; return $a['head'] == 'y' ? -1 : 1; } // sort the higher membkey first: return ...


5

cmp is the a callback function that usort uses to compare complex objects (like yours) to figure out how to sort them. modify cmp for your use (or rename it to whatever you wish) function cmp( $a, $b ) { if( $a->tid == $b->tid ){ return 0 ; } return ($a->tid < $b->tid) ? -1 : 1; } usort($myobject,'cmp'); function sort_by_tid( $a, ...


5

I experienced this problem when PHP was throwing an error within my callback function. rather than spitting out the actual error that was happening, PHP would throw the "usort(): Array was modified by the user comparison function" error.


5

try this: http://php.net/manual/en/function.usort.php


5

Your custom sort function needs to return the value: function my_search_sort($a, $b) { return strcmp($a->nid, $b->nid); } EDIT I've updated the code on the other answer you referenced, it was incorrect.


5

Using usort() with a callback which calls filemtime()... This is untested, but I believe it will set you on the correct path... // First define a comparison function to be used as a callback function filetime_callback($a, $b) { if (filemtime($a) === filemtime($b)) return 0; return filemtime($a) < filemtime($b) ? -1 : 1; } // Then sort with usort() ...


5

You could also use array_intersect(). It preserves the order of the first array. Give an array of all cardinal directions in the correct order as the first parameter and the array to sort as the second. $cardinals = array( 'north', 'east', 'south', 'west' ); $input = array( 'south', 'west', 'north' ); print_r( array_intersect( $cardinals, $input ) );


5

You explicitly write that you do not want to have global variables, so I do not make you a suggestion with static variables as well because those are actually global variables - and those are not needed at all. In PHP 5.2 (and earlier) if you need call context within the callback, you can create your context by making use of a class of it's own that carries ...


5

Aha, a case for the Schwartzian Transform. It basically consists of three steps: decorate; you turn every value into an array with the value as the first element and the key/index as the second sort (as per normal) undecorate; you reverse step 1 Here it is (I've tweaked it to your particular use case): function decorate(&$v, $k) { ...


5

I think this question deserves an update. I know the original question was for PHP version 5.2, but I came here looking for a solution and found one for newer versions of PHP and thought this might be useful for other people as well. For PHP 5.3 and up, you can use the 'use' keyword to introduce local variables into the local scope of an anonymous function. ...


4

Your items in the array are objects, not associative arrays, so you need to refer to them like this: function cmp($a, $b) { return strcmp($a->slug, $b->slug); } usort($allPages, 'cmp')


4

Few notes: To use any of the array functions on the json_decode()ed data, you must pass true as the second parameter which gives you an associative array instead of an object. Whenever you plan to sort an array, look at this page which helps you decide which of the 12+ array sorting functions you should use. Since the desired sorting is not intuitive ...


4

http://www.php.net/manual/en/function.natsort.php Sort an array using a "natural order" algorithm $a = array("0-5", "50-100", "10-50", "150-250", "100-150"); natsort($a); print_r($a); result: Array ( [0] => 0-5 [2] => 10-50 [1] => 50-100 [4] => 100-150 [3] => 150-250 ) NOTE: the keys will stay the same and are not ...



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