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5

The answer to all your questions are the same: No. It's one of the advantages of UTF-8: all ASCII bytes do not occur when encoding non-ASCII code points into UTF-8. For example, you can safely use strlen on a UTF-8 string, only that its result is the number of bytes instead of UTF-8 code points.


3

What is the difference between write() and os.write()? It's analogous to the difference between the C functions fwrite(3) and write(2). The latter is a thin wrapper around an OS-level system call, whereas the former is part of the standard C library, which does some additional buffering, and ultimately calls the latter when it actually needs to write its ...


3

Decoding the data as Padraic Cunningham suggested should work: data = urllib.request.urlopen(url).read().decode("utf-8") You also asked for the official documentatio for the for-loop. I'm not sure if you refer to this or you are talking about the iteration behaviour of data. The iteration behaviour of a bytes is as stated here: Since bytes objects ...


2

HTML 5 uses RFC 2388 (obsoleted by RFC 7578), however HTML 5 explicitly removes the Content-Type header from non-file fields, while the RFCs do not: The parts of the generated multipart/form-data resource that correspond to non-file fields must not have a Content-Type header specified. Their names and values must be encoded using the character encoding ...


2

UCS-2 is an older version of UTF-16 so you should probably try both (auto-detect text encoding is not a bullet-proof job). We have the source encoding. We can speculate the target encoding is UTF-8 (because it's the sensible choice in 2016 and your question is actually tagged as UTF-8). So we have all we need. We should first remove non-standard raw byte ...


2

Character has no direct (public) accessor to its UTF-8 representation. There are some internal methods in Character.swift dealing with the UTF-8 bytes, but the public stuff is implemented in String.UTF8View in StringUTF8.swift. Therefore String(myChar).utf8.count is the correct way to obtain the length of the characters UTF-8 representation.


2

cryptor->generateKey returns SecByteBlock, a sequence of bytes. While casting to (char *) and constructing a std::string make sense because they do not deal only with text, jstring holds text (from the Unicode character set in the UTF-16 encoding). You code tries to convert non-text bytes to a Java string. If you really want to do that you have to use a ...


2

It maybe safe as there is absolutely no difference between ASCII and utf-8 for code points between 0 and 127.


2

If you are in fact using python3, you don't need to do anything. You can just print the string. Also you can just copy and paste the literals into a python string and it will work. '「哇哈哈!!」' == '\u300c\u54c7\u54c8\u54c8!!\u300d' In regards to the updated question, the difference is escaping. If you type a string literal, some sequences of characters are ...


1

Just open your file in an any editor capable of Reading the encoding you have in your file and then save the file in the desired encoding.


1

The Symfony Cache layer acts like an intermediary HTTP cache, much like a reverse proxy like Varnish would. This means that for a response to be cacheable, it needs to be public (any cache can store it) and not private (only the browser cache may store it). Additionally, an appropriate caching strategy must be used, like a max-age in the Cache-Control ...


1

final InputStreamReader input = new InputStreamReader(is, decoder); Your InputStreamReader will read all the data from the input stream. This means there is no data available anymore. In addition you already close it. You will need to create a InputStream two times. One time to test the character set and one more time to actually read the data. So change ...


1

Probably, you should not force any encoding: String text = File.ReadAllText(@"C:\MyFile.txt"); The system (as well as NotePad+) will try to detect the actual encoding by using so called BOM (Byte Order Mark) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byte_order_mark


1

When writing the file from your pandas dataframe, do not use a codecs file object. pandas.to_csv() already encodes your data, and the codecs file object then has to try to decode (as ASCII) in order to be able to re-encode it. Just use a regular file: with open(outputfile, "w") as outputfile: dataframe.to_csv(outputfile, encoding="utf-8") You can use ...


1

Not a clean solution, but for a quick fix just use .replace('\0xe2', ' ').


1

Python 2 solution using unicodecsv. Note that the documentation for unicodecsv says the module should be opened in binary mode (wb). Make sure to write Unicode strings. #coding is required to support non-ASCII characters in the source file. Make sure to save the source file in UTF-8. #coding:utf8 import unicodecsv with open('test.csv','wb') as f: # ...


1

You need to decode the bytes to str: In [12]: data = urllib.request.urlopen("http://stackoverflow.com/questions/38014233/data-types-and-documentation-for-for-loop-in-python-3/38014292#38014292").read() In [13]: type(data) Out[13]: bytes In [14]: type(data.decode("utf-8")) Out[14]: str In [15]: data[0] Out[15]: 60 In [16]: data.decode("utf-8")[0] Out[16]:...


1

The simplest answer to this question was that i was opening the datafile without specifying the encoding. Had i added the encoding="utf-8" to the open function, and encoded the request as utf-8 this would have been solved rather quickly.


1

One should use CHARACTER SET utf8 or utf8mb4 for the encoding. utf8 covers all of Europe and most of the rest of the world. utf8mb4 covers all the worlds languages. utf8 is a subset of utf8mb4. One can use different COLLATIONs depending on the ordering you desire. Spanish, for example, (with utf8_spanish2_ci or utf8mb4_spanish2_ci) plays games with ll ...


1

Works finde for me: $dom = new \DOMDocument; $dom->loadHTML(utf8_decode($html)); ... return utf8_encode( $dom->saveHTML());



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